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Worth Our 



Weight In 



GOLD 



Contents 




Student Life 


8 


Academics 


72 


Sports 


92 


Greeks 


138 


Clubs 


202 


People 


254 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/southerner541990univ 




•^(Left) Lifting weights in Iron! of the Ad- 
ministration Building Steve Parton, alias 
Seymour, proves that the Eagles are 
"Worth their Weight in GO! I) • Photo 
by Barry Beard 



1990 
Southerner 
Volume 54 
University 

of 

Southern 

Mississippi 

Hattiesburg, 
Miss. 




Wo 



Title Paee 



WfKWFf 




A(Top) USM fans are always support- 
ing the football team. 
►(Right) Spirit runs black and gold in 
Eagle Country. 

► (Far Right) From the Hattiesburg 
campus to the Gulf Park campus on the 
Gulf Coast, USM students have the 
chance to experience all that nature has 
to offer. • Photos by Gary Haygood. 




2 Opening 












As a growing university, The 
University of Southern Mississippi 
is more than a classroom, laborato- 
ry, or library. It is a place abound- 
ing with opportunities for pursuing 
individual interests and developing 
talents. Here we spend oar days 
and nights preparing for a greater 
future. Surrounded by a pieasant 
atmosphere and hospitable people, 
Southern is the best place in the 
world to go to school. The old oaks 
and classic-style architecture lend 
an air of the Old South that is more 
than comfortable. 

Students at USM get involved 
in extra-curricular activities and 
have fun just being themselves. 
With many organizations, frater- 
nities and sororities to chose from, 
it's hard to be bored on campus. 
Classes are designed to hold the 
imagination and creativity of the 
students to promote their achieve- 
ment. 

At larger universities, students 
can get lost in the crowd, but this is 
not the case at USM. It's the close- 
ness of the students and the faculty 
that makes everyone feel a part of 
the university. For students, facul- 
ty and staff, the atmosphere at 
USM is as precious as gold. 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Worth Our Weight In 




Opening 3 




A(Top) The Cook Library is where 
you find exciting information as 
well as meet new people. • Photo by 
Gary Haygood 

► (Far Right) The Great American 
Poster Sale is one of many sidewalk 
sales that is a big part of campus 
life. • Photo by Julie Guintard 

► (Right) Seymour's is the in-a- 
hurry lunch pick-up for those stu- 
dents who don't have time to eat in 
the Commons. • Photo by Gary 
Haygood. 





4 Opening 





With so much to do at USM, 
time passes quickly. Before you 
know it, the semester ends and an- 
other begins. In between semes- 
ters, most students remember the 
days of sitting outside the Hub on a 
warm day, walking to class in the 
rain or studying in Seymour's 
when there is nothing else to do. 
Although these are everyday 
memories that everyone shares, 
students all have their own memo- 
ries of special times. 

Most students don't share these 
memories openly. They are that 
precious. With all that goes on day 
by day, someone is always there to 
make sure everyone hears about it. 
That is why we are here, the staff 
of the Southerner. Our sole pur- 
pose is to capture on paper the 
greatest memories of the year and 
pass them out to everyone. The 
years at Southern may fade away, 
but this book will always be there 
to bring back days gone by. Be- 
cause at USM, friendships are 
made that last forever, the golden 
opportunity of a lifetime. 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Worth Our Weight In 



GOLD 




Opening 5 







A(Top) USM is known for its beau- 
tiful rose gardens and extraordinary 
azaleas. 

► (Far Right) Togetherness is a big 
part of life at USM, and extra-cur- 
ricular activities facilitate that to- 
getherness. 

► (Right) Eagle spirit flies high as 
Seymour soars over the crowd to 
lead them in cheers. 




6 Opening 





With all that Southern offers, it 
is clear to see that this university is 
one of the best. The faculty is a big 
part of this because of their con- 
cern for the students. Each profes- 
sor has his/her own special style of 
teaching, which at times is witty 
and keeps the class interesting. 

Housing seven colleges and sev- 
eral schools, the university attracts 
students from all over the United 
States and parts of the world. This 
makes for a very mixed type of 
campus life and adds to the flavor 
of life at USM. 

Because of these people, the 
combinations of their talents and 
personalities, they all give South- 
ern the campus atmosphere we all 
know and love. We are the Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi. We 
are "Worth Our Weight in Gold." 
| By Vincent Clark and Lorna 
Freeman 



Worth Our Weight In 

— cot n — 




Opening 7 



■ 




8 Division Page 




Worth Our 
Weight In GOLD 




Student Life 



A large part of our college years is 
devoted to social growth and personal 
development. We USM students are 
interested in entertaining ourselves 
with a multitude of extra-curricular 
activities, both on-campus and out in 
the local community. 

When the studying is over and the 
last book is closed, we have the oppor- 
tunity to do many things at Southern, 
including going to plays and music 



recitals, viewing on-campus movies or 
just getting together with good 
friends. But whatever the activity, 
one thing is always true — USM stu- 
dents like to get invovled. 

The mood and spirit of Southern 
students was evident all year and 
clearly brought truth to the fact that 
we are "Worth Our Weight in 
GOLD." || By Lorna Freeman 



Division Page 9 



► (Right) The Imperial Palace is one of the many 
attractions visited by the USM students enrolled in the 
Japanese Studies Program. 

▼(Below) The Statue of Bhudda was viewed by stu- 
dents of the Japanese Studies Program. 




iL^L O ^ 






► (Center) Brigette Burlette was one of the 
many lucky USM students who worked as a 
merchandise hostess for Walt Disney — MGM 
Studios. 

A(Above) Spaceship Earth at Epcot Center 
was one of the spectacular sites that USM stu- 
dents visited. 



10 Summer Experiences 






Summer 
Experiences 



During the summer many stu- 
dents participated in USM's Co- 
operative Education and Interna- 
tional Studies programs. Co-op 
students alternated semesters of 
study with full-time work to ob- 
tain a more meaningful educa- 
tional experience. Students 
worked with NASA, Disney 
World, Naval Oceanographic 
Office, BellSouth Services, Mis- 
sissippi Power and the Depart- 



ment of Agriculture, to name a 
few. 

Other students participated in 
one of many foreign studies pro- 
grams, including Japanese, Brit- 
ish, Carribean, Austrian and 
Russian. These programs were 
designed to enable students to 
earn academic credit while learn- 
ing about a new culture and, pos- 
sibly, a new language. 




A( Above) NASA is one of the many busin- 
esses that give jobs to USM students during 
the summer. 

A(Top) Joe Gazzo, a USM student, was 
employed by NASA as an accountant dur- 
ing the summer break. 



Summer Experiences 1 1 






•^(Right) Randy Raggio, an Eagle Connection Recruiter, 
visits with a prospective USM student. ▼(Below) Heidi 
Hudson helps USM bound student fill out a scholarship 
application. 




I -Is 




A(Above) Heidi Hudson and Michael 
Johnson welcome prospective students to a 
USM recruitment program in Laurel. 
► (Right) Looking at a full tour schedule. 
Eagle Connection members get ready to 
roll. 



12 Recruitment 




Promoting USM 
is easy 



The Office of Recruitment ex- 
ists to promote the University ac- 
curately. The job is much easier 
when the product is strong, as is 
the case with USM. Involvement 
of the entire university is also es- 
sential. 

When all these elements fit to- 
gether as well as they do at USM, 
recruitment efforts are effective. 
Results from last year include a 
larger freshman class with 25 
percent of these students scoring 
24 or better on the ACT, and 28 



percent of these individuals com- 
ing from states other than Missis- 
sippi. 

Among the many activities de- 
signed to provide information 
about USM, the campus visit is 
most important. More than 1 ,600 
students visited the campus last 
year to learn more about what 
USM has to offer. In addition, 
several special programs such as 
Fall Festival 1989 and Scholar's 
Day offer other opportunities for 
students to explore the campus. 





^<c 



* 






A(Far right) Barry Parker, an admissions 
counselor, highlights USM's nationally known 
accredited programs. A( Above) Students can 
relate their personal experiences about life at 
USM. 



Recruitment 13 



► (Right) These girls have just received their bids, 
and cannot wait to meet their new sisters! T(Below) 
Delta Zeta, Kappa Delta and Delta Gamma anxiously 
await their new pledges on bid day! 




A(Above) This Kappa Sigma is posing for 
the most wanted man in the country! 
► (Right) What a joyous time to meet new 
sisters on bid day! 



14 Rush 




Rushing Around 



High pitched squeals of joy 
and the thunder of hundreds of 
weary, nervous girls bounding 
down the stairs filled the air as 
Formal Sorority Rush ended on 
Bid Day afternoon. New pledges 
joyfully accepted their bids, end- 
ing a week of parties and skits. 
The sororities accepted new sis- 
ters for life. On the other side of 
campus, the fraternities were 
ending their week of slide shows 
and speakers with the handing 
out of bids. The Black Greeks 
were anticipating their rush, 



hosting parties at each semester 
beginning. After making grades 
for a semester and completing 
other requirements, the Black 
Greek hopefuls were asked to 
pledge and join the bonds of fra- 
ternity. 

Becoming part of the Greek 
system is a rewarding, exhiliarat- 
ing, aspect to college life. Wheth- 
er pledged through formal rush, 
or through the friendship of open 
rush, pledging Greek is the best 
choice for anyone who craves 
brotherhood, loyalty, and fun. 






A( Above) The circus comes to town in the 
Tri Delta chapter room! A(Top) The 
AKA's are having fun at their spring rush 
party. Is anyone hungry? 



Rush 1 5 



► (Right) These two students are forced to try their 
luck with the computer to find classes to replace those 
that were closed. • Photo by Gary Haygood ▼(Bot- 
tom) New students wait in line to check in for orienta- 
tion. • Photo by John McLemore 







A(Top) Many people wait in line for finan- 
cial aid assistance in the Student Service 
Building. • Photo by Gary Haygood 
► (Right) Scanning the closed or cancelled 
classes list, this student makes a list of new 
possibilities. • Photo by Andy Miller 



y. 



16 Registration 




Beginning Line-Up 



Over the summer, students 
were given several opportunities 
to pre-register for fall classes. 
Orientation for freshmen and 
transfer students lasted any- 
where from a full day to a day 
and a half. The orientation in- 
cluded lectures about different 
aspects of life at Southern, a tour 
of campus and registration itself. 

Returning students were able 
to register using the S.T.A.R.S. 
(Southern's Telephone Assisted 
Registration System) program. 
Either way, the first step re- 
quired in registration was a meet- 
ing with an adviser to plan out the 



class schedule. After that, it was 
all a matter of putting it into the 
computer with a personal visit, or 
by using S.T.A.R.S. As always, 
having to get the student I.D. 
card and/or parking sticker was 
a hassle. As simple as it seems 
now, the process for beginners 
was plagued by not following 
instructions correctly or by a 
dreaded computer error. In any 
event, registration was only the 
first step necessary to begin uni- 
versity life. The rest of the exper- 
ience, pass or fail, relied solely 
upon the student. 
■ By Vincent Clark 




A(Above) This student takes the first step 
in registration — checking the schedule for 
flaws. • Photo by Andy Miller A(Top) A 
student checks her schedule with the infa- 
mous "blue book" before attempting to reg- 
ister again. • Photo by Gary Haygood 



Registration 17 



► (Right) With the beginning of the semester only 
hours away, Stephanie and Angela Palmer hurriedly 
move their belongings to their apartment. • Photo by 
Gary Haygood 

▼(Bottom) Marshella Brown, a Resident Assistant 
for Mississippi Hall, returns to school with the chores 
of moving in. 





A(Above) With some difficulty, Monica 
Estupinan and Angela Landrenau try to 
move into their apartment at Peppertree. • 
Photo by Gary Haygood 
► (Right) Studying hard is the key to get- 
ting an "A." 



18 Moving In 




Moving In 



On Aug. 27 students who had 
chosen to live on campus moved 
into the residence halls. For 
some, there was much confusion, 
especially among freshman and 
transfer students. Those who had 
lived on campus before were able 
to move in with little or no trou- 
ble at all. For some, this was the 
first step away from home. As 
they moved in, parents gave their 
fond farewells. 

But for those who had been 
there before, it was just another 
day to be dealt with in the unend- 



ing road of life. 

As usual, there was much 
shifting around between resi- 
dence halls and dorm rooms as 
students tried to cram items from 
home into their cubicle-sized 
rooms. Within a couple of hours 
of moving in, a room was made as 
close to home as possible. Indeed, 
life at college wasn't so bad as 
long as you knew that the t.v., 
refrigerator and bed were pa- 
tiently awaiting your return from 
class. 
| By Vincent Clark 




i 





A(Above) Moving in is the hardest part of 
campus life. 

A(Top Right) A hall worker shows the 
rules of the women's hall to a future male 
guest. 



Moving In 19 




h 



Going to 
Class 



Going to class for some stu- 
dents was a nightmare. Mom 
was not there to wake you up, 
and usually there wasn't a bus 
to catch to get there. If you did 
not use a map to find class loca- 
tions the night before you could 
have gotten lost somewhere be- 
neath all of the construction 
rubble. 

Fortunately enough, if you 
weren't sure you were in the 
right class, neither did anyone 
else. At least you got there. In 
fact, you saw many people 
whom you hadn't seen in ages. 

Soon, going to class wasn't 
too much of a chore. Everything 
worked out fine, and so it was 
for many students, when get- 
ting there truly was half the 
fun. 
| By Vincent Clark 








A(Above Top) USM students wait for the 
bus to take them to class. • Photo by Julie 
Guintard 

A(Above) A professor let's class out early, 
so this student quickly leaves before he 
changes his mind. • Photo by Julie Guin- 
tard 






' 



^*\ 



20 Going to Class 







•^(Left) A USM student contemplates her 
next class. • Photo by Julie Guintard 




"*&* s jT 








(Left)-^ It's raining again in Hatticsburg. • 
Photo by Gary Haygood 
A(Above) Some students find any excuse 
to stop for a break before arriving to class. • 
Photo by Julie Guintard 



Going to Class 21 




Exam Week 



Perhaps the most trying time of 
school is during exam week, when 
students forego partying to do the 
dreaded stress-producing task of 
cramming. It would be great to be 
able to avoid this, but let's face it, 
there is no way out. 

Fortunately, USM offers its stu- 
dents places where they can study 
and relax at the same time. Uni- 
versity Food Services in conjunc- 
tion with the Associated Student 
Body decided to have Seymour's 
stay open 24 hours a day during 
exam week in the fall semester as a 
place to study and relax. This was 
the first time students were offered 
a place to study as an alternative to 
the library. 
| By Rena Williams 





A(Top) It can never hurt to quickly look 
over a few notes. 

A(Above) Susie Harbor crams for her fi- 
nal exam the next day. 




22 Exam Week 




•^(Left) Realizing he should have read 
some books earlier in the semester, Keith 
Deer grabs the Cliffs Notes. 



^(Left) The pressure of exam week really 
gets to this band member. 
A(Above) Patrice Algero busily types a 
paper during exam week. 



Exam Week 23 




Going Out 



When students were not in class, writing that 
paper that was put off until the last minute, or 
cramming for a final exam, they engaged in 
several types of extracurricular activities that 
USM and Hattiesburg had to offer. 

With the expansion of Cloverleaf Mall came 
many students who bought out the new Wal- 
doffs department store or relaxed in the food 
court for a bite to eat. 

For some, relaxing meant pumping iron and 
swimming laps at the Wellness Center or the 
Raquetball Club, two popular spots of the fit- 
ness craze. Still, some preferred the night life 
social scene. The weekends found students in 
the Judges Chamber, Sharky's Shuk & Jive 
and Mississippi's. 

A real late night favorite of the USM stu- 
dent was the IHOPor Krystal. Here, those who 
had been out on the town or in studying late 
could take advantage of the convenience of 24- 
hour food service. 

Also convenient and popular among students 
were the 750 movies shown in Bennett Audito- 
rium on campus each week. Sponsored by the 
University Activities Council (UAC), these 
movies and Comedy Zones, which featured 
amateur comedians, attracted many students. 
■ By Heather McKee 





T** 



»s» „■ 



8*1 






A(Top) If you want to go out, eating is 
probably number one on the list. A( Above) 
Many students spend their spare time keep- 
ing in shape. • Photo by Gary Haygood 




24 Going Out 




■^(Left) The Comedy Zone is just one of 
many events on campus that allow students 
to get out. • Photo by Gary Haygood 










A(Top) One of many places that students 
go to relax and have fun. • Photo by Gary 
Haygood -^(Left) Many students faired 
foul weather to get tickets for USM games. 
• Photo by Bradley Bounds 



' 



Going Out 25 




UAC 
Programs 



Every month there was a chance 
to laugh at the Comedy Zones held 
in Seymour's and in the spring, at 
the Second Annual Student 
Comedian Competition. The 
Thursday night movies series re- 
mained a popular diversion and in- 
cluded pop culture phenomena like 
"Sex, Lies, and Videotape" and 
"Batman," as well as provocative 
films like Spike Lee's "Do the 
Right Thing." The HooDoo 
Gurus' concert proved exciting 
and loud for the many students in 
attendance. 

The UAC provided low-cost al- 
ternatives to expensive off-campus 
clubs and theatres in an alcohol 
free environment. All in all, UAC 
entertainment was pretty afforda- 
ble and wholesome. 




y--f 



—J- 









I 



■— ._'. 



S&Tf 







A(Top) Will and the Bushmen performed 

at UAC's concert last fall. 

A(Above) UAC's Alison Schuh talks to 

USM students about the HooDoo Gurus 

concert. 




26 UAC 







ilk &f&''\ {'/' *i 



•^(Left) Comedian Leslie Norris at UAC's 
Comedy Zone performs with friend Barbie. 
• Photos by Gary Haygood. 





A(Above) Comedian Mark Wilkes elicit 
laughs at the Comedy Zone. 
•^(Left) One of the comedians that per- 
formed for the UAC's Comedy Zone is 
dressed to kill. 



UAC 27 



28 Fine Arts 





▼(Below) The bell choir practices. • Pho- 
tos by Jeanine Guicc 





Cultural 
Experiences 



USM offers a wide variety of 
fine arts events ranging from per- 
formances by nationally known 
artists to student-produced perfor- 
mances. 

In the past year, the College of 
The Arts has sponsored or co-spon- 
sored Maurice Bourgue and his 
Ensemble a Vent, The Debussy 
Trio and Anna Maria Alberghetti 
and John Raitt. In addition, var- 
ious guests artists such as Carlos 
Barbosa-Lima, Robert Roubas, 
Evelyn de la Rosa, and the U.S. 
Navy Band have appeared in recit- 
als and concerts through the spon- 
sorship of the School of Music. 
The C.W. Woods Art Gallery and 
the W.J. Lok Exhibition Lobby of- 
? er art exhibitions of local, nation- 
al and international distinction 
such as the Norman Rockwell 
traveling exhibition and, in the 



summer of 1990, will host an ex- 
hibit of Goya prints. 

With more than 200 concerts 
and recitals performed annually in 
the Mannoni Performing Arts 
Center, Bennett Auditorium and 
Marsh Auditorium, the School of 
Music is by far the most prolific 
producer of cultural events on 
campus. The Department of The- 
atre and Dance produces four 
mainstage plays and two main- 
stage dance productions per year. 
Plays such as Eric Overmyer's On 
The Verge are entered into region- 
al and national competition. The 
oldest Summer Repertory Theatre 
in Mississippi and student-pro- 
duced and directed showcase pro- 
ductions round out the dramatic 
offerings at USM. 
; ?f By Robert Warren 



Fine Arts 29 



► (Right) After Songfest students gather 
at the Alumni House for a reception put on 
by the Chi Omegas. 

▼( Below) Laura Gillis, Songfest Chair- 
man, and another Chi Omega go over the 
order of performers before Songfest. 






A(Above) The ladies of Alpha Kappa Al- 
pha serenaded listeners with their rendition 
of the "Song of the Bells." 
► (Right) The men of Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon brought the house down with their ver- 
sion of Alabama's "Mississippi Christ- 
mas." 







30 Songfest 





^( Below) Members of Delta Gamma 
"snook up" the audience with their rendi- 
tion of Klvis Presley's 'Madhouse Rock'" 




Chi Omega 
Songfestival 



On Friday, December 8, 1989 
competing groups and many spec- 
tators gathered in Reed Green 
Coliseum for the 38th annual Chi 
Omega Songfest, sponsored by 
Coca-Cola. Approximately $1,000 
was presented to the American 
Diabetes Association after the 
event. 

Delta Delta Delta sorority sang 
their way to the top and won first 
place in the sorority division, as 
well as overall winner for best per- 
formance. Other winners in the so- 
rority division were Alpha Delta 
Pi, second place and Alpha Kappa 



Alpha, third place. In the fraterni- 
ty division, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Alpha Tau Omega and Delta Tau 
Delta won first, second and third 
places, respectively. Phi Mu Alpha 
Sinfonia was the overall winner in 
the mixed group category. 

Dr. Joe Paul, dean of Student 
Development, welcomed everyone; 
Warren Dunn held an invocation; 
and Dr. Paul handed out awards. 

As an added bonus, Hattiesburg 
Mayor Ed Morgan officially de- 
clared December 8 "Songfest 
Day." 
•| By Heather McKee 



Songfest 31 



CALENDAR 


OF EVENTS 


* Feb. 1: "Do the Right Thing," 


* Feb. 13: Mark Mathabane, au- 


movie, Bennett Auditorium. 


thor of "Caffir Boy," spoke 


* Feb. 6: James Hull, a poet, 


about his experiences growing 


journalist and playwright, pre- 


up in South Africa. 


sented a one-man show, "Black 


* Feb. 19: Dr. Neil McMillen, 


History and Black Heritage," at 


USM history professor, lectured 


Stout Hall. 


on his latest book, DARK 


* Feb. 7: Dr. Charles Beady, 


JOURNEY: BLACK MISSIS- 


president of Piney Woods Coun- 


SIPPIANS IN THE AGE OF 


try Life School, spoke at Stout 


JIM CROW. 


Hall. 


* Feb. 20: Photojournalist 


* Feb. 8: A Black Business Fo- 


Charles Moore presented "Pic- 


rum featured USM graduates 


tures That Make A Difference: 


who had opened their own bu- 


The Civil Rights Movement" in 


sinesses. 


Stout Hall. 





A(Abovc) Dr. Charles Beady, president of 
Piney Woods Country Life School, speaks 
during one of the conferences during Black 
History Month. 




32 Black History Month 




■^(Left) Students prepare for 
the candlelight march to honor 
Dr. Martin l.ulher King Jr. 
▼(Below) The candlelight illu- 
minates the pride on this stu- 
dent's face as she participates in 
the candlelight march. 




A(Above) Robert Walker, the mayor of 
Vicksburg, speaks at one of the meetings 
during Black History Month. 
•^(Left) These students participate in the 
march during Black History Month. 



Black 
History 
Month 

During Black History Month, 
USM offered students a variety of 
activities to promote African 
American history awareness. 

USM students actively partici- 
pated in a march to honor the great 
human rights leader Dr. Martin 
Luther King Jr. Celebrating the 
life of a man whose national efforts 
aimed at promoting the rights of 
all people, regardless of race, color 
or ethnic origin was important to 
USM faculty and students. 

Since admitting the first black 
student in the late 60's, USM now 
has many minority students result- 
ing in a richer cultural and social 
environment for all students. 
I Bv Tammy Petro 



Black History Month 33 




;i 



MD Telethon 



The R.C. Cook University 
Union was the sight of the Hatties- 
burg area Muscular Dystrophy 
Telethon on Labor Day Weekend. 
More than $32,000 was raised for 
the Mississippi MD Association. 

The 24 hour event was held in 
conjunction with the Jerry Lewis 
Labor Day Telethon. WHLT, a lo- 
cal CBS affiliate, broadcasted the 
local telethon to a seven county 
area around the Hub City. Various 
university organizations helped 
man the telephones during the 
event, including members of the 
Arnold Air Society and the Baptist 
Student Union, to name a few. 



▼(Below) USM Volunteers help Jerry's I 

kids. I 





,f x Hkv**" 




(•^(Left) Telephone volunteers keep busy tak- 
ing down pledge information. 



T( Below) WHIT 22 broadcasts the telethon. 



II' 1 ' 




■5N* 



\ th\ 



Hk 



T3 



I m m** 



4(Left) USM Head Football Coach Curly 
Hallman shows his support for the telethon. 




MD Telethon 35 



Spirit at USM 

This year brought many well 
fought for victories for USM, as well 
as a few frustrating defeats, but 
throughout it all, school spirit among 
the students, faculty, staff and alum- 
ni supported our Eagles and followed 
them everywhere they went. The stu- 
dents got a chance to express their 
spirit at several pep rallies, including 
a midnight pep rally for homecoming. 
Under the direction of a new cheer- 
leading coach, Bill Thallemer, our 
cheerleaders aroused the spirit and 
got everyone up and out of their seats 
to do "Two Bits." Southern fans, 
known for their continuous support of 
their school, adorned themselves with 
black and gold on t-shirts, buttons, 
bumper stickers, pom pons and many 
other items. The year also saw a new 
Eagle mascot costume for Seymour. 
| By Heather McKee 




A( Above) Students show their school spirit 
at the pep rally before the USM — Alabama 
game. 

► (Right) USM students show the excite- 
ment of the game. 




36 Spirit 







•^(Left) USM fans party the Eagles to vic- 
tory. 

■^(Far Left) The old Eagle makes one of 
his final appearances. • Photos by Gary 
Haygood 





j I A(Above) Seymour shows that he's a 

strong asset. 



Spirit 3" 



The Pride 

The "Pride of Mississippi" is 
our name for the USM Marching 
Band. We call them the Pride for 
many reasons. 

First, we're proud of the hard 
work they put into each perfor- 
mance to make it a successful one. 
When the Pride goes onto the field, 
we know we're in for a good show. 
_ Second, they're the symbol of _ 
both our university and our state. 
Many of the band members are na- 
tive Mississippians. Every time 
they go onto the field on a road 
trip, they represent some of Mis- 
sissippi's best and brightest young 
people. 

Finally, we're proud of them be- 
cause of their SPIRIT. Often, 
when a game is going badly, the 
band members are the only ones 
who cheer. The Pride seems to 
have an undying sense of spirit 
that keeps them going when all 
else goes wrong. 

The Pride is an indispensable 
part of this university's intellectual 
and athletic landscapes. For all 
these reasons and many more, we 
call them the Pride. 





38 The Pride 



•^(Left) Serious practice is what makes 
our Pride shine 

•4(1 ar Left) AM Pride members love play- 
ing it like a true Ragle. 




A Above) We are Fantastic! 




pmmm 

JUL* 



■■■,-.. . %£*■>«{ f.M*fe:.. ' f ' < 



/ ft *rf ' «< I 




The Pride 39 



Color was definitely the word to de- 
scribe the festivities at Homecoming 
this year. The theme, "USM: The 
Colors of Success," was chosen by the 
Associate Student Body (ASB) be- 
cause of the diversity portrayed in the 
colors of USM. Homecoming at 
USM is certainly a fun time. Only 
those involved can imagine how much 
preparation it took to make Home- 
coming '89 a success. There were nu- 
merous fun-filled activities for every- 
one. Their was a black and gold spirit 
in the air. The students, faculty, staff, 
alumni and loyal USM fans all had a 




A(Above) Head Coach Curley Hallman give the 
crowd a pep talk during the pep rally. Photo by 
Robert Youngblood 



big part to play in USM '89. 

Homecoming Week also was Alco- 
hol Awareness Week, and the Univer- 
sity Activities Council sponsored the 
movie "Clean and Sober" in Bennett 
Auditorium. Prior to the game stu- 
dents joined in on the alumni tradi- 
tion of tailgating parties. For the first 
time, the ASB sponsored student tail- 
gating which turned out to be a great 
success. The Pride lead a caravan to 
the stadium for the presentation of 
the homecoming maids at the game 
against the University of Southwest- 
ern Louisiana. 



Homecoming 1989 



\ 



<s* „- 



4. 




40 Homecoming 



▼ (Below) The Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
House shows the colors of success. Their 
sign gave them a third place award in the 
beauty category 



USL 








<# 



•^(Left) Brett Favre looks for an open re- 
ceiver during USM's Homecoming loss to 
USL. • Photo by Glenn Andrews A(A- 
bove) Homecoming brought out the excite- 
ment in everyone. A(Top) Two enthusias- 
tic students help decorate their organiza- 
tion's float for the Homecoming contest. 



Homecoming 41 



HOMECOMING COURT 



Cassandra Denise Johnson was 
crowned Homecoming Queen 1989 
on Saturday, October 21. Cassandra 
was selected by the student body in 
campus elections. Other members of 
the court were Scarlett Vogt from 
D'Iberville, Student Body Maid; Jen- 
nie Williams from Ft. Washington, 
MD, Graduate Maid; Tracey Carver 
from Waveland, Senior Maid; Krissy 
Baucum from Picayune, Junior 
Maid; Harriet Lanette Hawthorne 
from Jackson, Sophomore Maid; and 
Kari Ann Lubnow from Pensacola, 
Freshman Maid. 




A(Above) The Eagles played exciting football 
during an extravagant homecoming day. 



Queen Cassandra Johnson, the 
daughter of Mr. Marcus Johnson and 
Mrs. Geraldine Johnson, is a commu- 
nications major from Prentiss. She 
was a resident assistant for Hillcrest 
Dormitory and was on the advisory 
board for residence life. Cassandra 
was escorted by Associated Student 
Body President Jon Richard and 
crowned by President Aubrey K. 
Lucas. 




Homecoming Court 1989 



42 Homecoming 



4 (Left) USM'S COLORS OF SUCCESS 
shone bright during homecoming. 




■ < ■ v - ^ 

# ■ *\ i v ^ - _ 








^jfe . 



A(Top) Eagle fans of all kinds eagerly 

awaited the beginning of the homecoming 

activities. 

▲( Above) Dr. Lucas carefully places the 

crown on our royal queen. 

^(Left) USM's 1989 Homecoming 

Queen, Cassandra Johnson, is escorted by 

ASB President, Jon Richard. 



Homecoming 43 



Homecoming '89 began on 
Wednesday with the building of the 
floats. The campus became covered 
with wooden frames and chicken wire 
stuffed with tissue paper. Many of the 
campus organizations worked for 
many hours showing their USM spir- 
it. Much effort and planning went 
into the floats to prepare for judging 
on Saturday. Thursday night blasted 
off with a street party in front of the 
Administration Building. There was 
even a disc jockey to keep the party 
jumping. People who were guarding 
finished floats and students just out to 
have fun enjoyed the music right in 
the center of campus. On Friday 




A(Above) USM's president, Dr. Lucas, greets a 
large crowd during a homecoming pep rally. 



Y 1 04 and Coca-Cola helped to put on 
the traditional midnight pep rally. 
Dr. Lucas and Coach Hallman spoke, 
and the homecoming maids also were 
introduced. Many students and alum- 
ni gathered with the USM cheer- 
leaders and mascot, Seymour, for a 
chilly, but spirited rally. 

Saturday brought beautiful weath- 
er, a game and the judging of the 
floats. The winners for the Home- 
coming floats for theme and beauty 
were Kappa Sigma, Alpha Delta Pi 
and Phi Theta Kappa. The winners 
for originality were Sigma Chi, Al- 
pha Delta Pi and Chi Alpha. 



Homecoming 







^0^M 









'.'■'■^., 







■ 




A(Above) Pride Alumni take the field dur- 
ing Homecoming to once again play for the 
crowd. 



44 Homecoming 



▼(Below) Phi Kappa Taus prepare to meet 
former members during Homecoming. 



E 



v lo me; m 

: l|lllll|!i] 




MNI 




■■' ■ . -■*■ a 






... • *' 







• 



•^(Left) Ticket taker Toni Westbrook 
takes a student's ticket at the Homecoming 
game. A(Above) The Dixie Darlings at 
Homecoming. A(Top) Dixie Darling 
Christy Swindle takes in the Homecoming 
game. • Photos by Gary Haygood. 



Homecoming 45 



Debra Escher 



Debby Escher of Pascougla, is 
pursuing a degree in elementary 
education. The daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Roland Escher St., 
Escher is quite active. She is a 
member of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Southern Style, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Order of Omega, Phi Delta Rho, 
Rho Lambda, Gamma Alpha Ep- 
silon, Lambda Sigma, Alpha 
Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
Gamma Beta Phi, National Key 



Honor Society and Phi Tau Chi. 
She is president of Chi Omega so- 
rority. As well as being a leader, 
Escher also is a follower and a hard 
worker when the need arises. She 
relates easily with all types of peo- 
ple and maintains a constant con- 
cern for others. She conveys a posi- 
tive attitude to everyone she meets, 
and her spirit toward USM is ex- 
emplified through the many posi- 
tions she has served on campus. 








Billy Stewart 



Billy is from Pearl, Miss, and is 
pursuing a major in history. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Billy 
Wayne Stewart Sr. On campus 
Billy is a well-respected role mod- 
el. He is involved in numerous ac- 
tivities and organizations and 
serves as an officer in most of 
them. Highlights of Billy's honors 
include Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Who's Who Among American 
Colleges and Universities, South- 
ern Style and Mr. USM. A distin- 



guishable quality about Billy is 
that he has captured many honors 
and participated in many activities 
while still maintaining a 4.0 
G.P.A. As well as being a leader, 
Billy also is a follower and a hard 
worker. His positive outlook on life 
and his spirit toward the university 
is exemplified through the posi- 
tions he has held on campus. Billy 
relates easily with all types of peo- 
ple and has touched USM in every 
aspect. 



46 Homecoming 



Mr. and Miss USM 




Homecoming 47 



Hall of Fame 



Hall of Fame is the highest honor at USM. It is reserved for graduating seniors who 
have made significant contributions to the university, other students and the community 
through substantial involvement and leadership in campus life, as well as exemplary 
scholastic achievement. 



A computer science major from 
Columbia, JOHN E. BROWN 
was a member of the Association 
of Computer Machinery and the 
Men's Varsity Letterman Club. 
The Dean's List Scholar partici- 
pated in AT&T's summer intern 
program. He is the son of Mrs. An- 
nie Lue Thurmond. 




The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lockhart F. Dees, SALLY ANN 
DEES is a journalism major from 
Metairie, La. In addition to serv- 
ing as ASB vice president, this 
Dean's List Scholar also was a 
member of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Phi Delta Rho, Order of Omega 
and Phi Mu sorority. 



RICHARD A. HAMMOND, 

the son of Vicky M. Hammond, is 
a journalism major from Metairie, 
La. Hammond served as executive 
editor, columnist and photogra- 
pher at the Student Printz. He also 
was a member of Omicron Delta 
Kappa and the University Activi- 
ties Council. 





48 Hall of Fame 





A speech communication major 
from Hattiesburg, MICHELLE 
RENEE JEROME is the daugh- 
ter of Raoul and Althea Jerome. 
The National Dean's List Scholar 
received Honors College and 
Award of Excellence scholarships. 
Jerome was a member of Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Phi Delta Rho and 
Delta Gamma sorority. 



The son of Dr. and Mrs. Ken 
McCarty of Hattiesburg, KEN- 
NETH MORGAN McCARTY is 
a banking and finance major. He 
was a National Merit Finalist and 
served as president of Sigma Chi 
fraternity and was a member of 
Omicron Delta Kappa and Phi 
Kappa Phi. 



ROBERT D. PIERCE II, the 

son of Robert Pierce and Peggy B. 
Pierce, is a marketing major from 
Petal. Selected to represent USM 
at the Jackson Chamber of Com- 
merce Future Leaders, Pierce 
served as president of the Interfra- 
ternity Council, treasurer of the 
Student Alumni Association and 
president of Phi Eta Sigma. The 
President's List Scholar also was a 
member of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Golden Key National Honor Soci- 
ety and Sigma Chi fraternity. 



The son of David and Carolyn 
Engle and Terry Richard, JONA- 
THAN MICHAEL RICHARD 

of Troy, OH. is an economics ma- 
jor specializing in international 
business administration. Selected 
for Outstanding Young Men of 
America, Richard served as ASB 
president and treasurer and chron- 
icler of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fra- 
ternity. He also served on the Uni- 
versity Athletic Council and the 
University Calendar Committee. 





Hall of Fame 49 






^Jr M \ I L 


m\\ 




A history major from Pearl, 
BILLY WAYNE STEWART 


-'V'*? : > 


t$w' 


JR. is the son of Billy and Linda 
Stewart. The President's List i 
Scholar served as president of 
Southern Style, director of ASB , 
Student Affairs and president of 
Lambda Sigma. He also was a 
member of Sigma Chi fraternity, 
the Student Alumni Association, 




-&9 


Phi Kappa Phi, Order of Omega 
and Omicron Delta Kappa. 

REBECCA LYNN WRIGHT 


.^. . ■„,_ ^ - 






of Jackson, Ala., the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Wright, 
is a journalism major. A Presiden- 
tial Scholar, Wright was a mem- 
ber of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Lambda Sigma, Phi Eta Sigma 
and Gamma Beta Phi. She also 
served as an ASB senator and ex- 
ecutive secretary, in addition to be- 
ing vice president of Delta Delta 
Delta sorority and a staff writer 
for the Student Printz. 



Best 

Citizen 

Male 



EVERETTE L. BROWN, the son of Ever- 
ette Lowe and Evelyn Brown, is a criminal 
justice major from Hempstead, N.Y. The 
Dean's List Scholar was a member of Order of 
Omega, Student Alumni Association and the 
Afro-American Student Organization. Other 
school activities included serving as president 
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. 




The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Robert Hammons II and 
Gene Yeatman St., MELANIE 
SUZANNE YEATMAN is an 
accounting major from Pearl. The 
President's List Scholar was a 
member of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Golden Key National Honor Soci- 
ety, Phi Delta Rho and Phi Eta 
Sigma. A member of the ASB 
cabinet, she also served as presi- 
dent of Delta Delta Delta sorority 
and president of Rho Lambda. 




Best 
Citizen 
Female 



50 Hall of lame 



Who's Who 



The 1 990 edition of Who's Who 
Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges includes 
the names of 28 students from 
USM who have been selected as 
national outstanding campus lead- 
ers. 

A recognized institution of the 
American academic community, 
the Who's Who award is conferred 
annually upon outstanding student 
leaders. Selection is made by cam- 
pus nominating committees and 



are based on decidedly above aver- 
age academic standing, communi- 
ty service, leadership ability and 
potential for continued success. 

These students join an elite 
group of students from more than 
1,400 institutions of higher learn- 
ing in all 50 states, the District of 
Columbia and several foreign na- 
tions. Outstanding students have 
been honored in the annual direc- 
tory since it was first published in 
1934. 




The daughter of Bobby and 
Mickie Baria, MELISSA SU- 
ZANNE BARIA is an accounting 
major from Pascagoula. The 
Dean's List Scholar was the recipi- 
ent of several scholarships and was 
ASB assistant spirit director. She 
also served on the ASB Homecom- 
ing Committee and Spirit Com- 
mittee. 




A journalism major from Bran- 
don, WENDY D. BARRETT is 

the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G.R. 
Barrett. The Dean's List Scholar 
was vice president and public rela- 
tions chairman of Phi Mu sorority. 
She plans to become a public rela- 
tions consultant. 



Who's Who 51 




STEPHANIE DENINE BAY- 
GENTS, a special education ma- 
jor from Hattiesburg, is the 
daughter of Larry and Doris Bay- 
gents. The Dean's List Scholar 
served as treasurer of Phi Delta 
Rho and was a member of Delta 
Gamma sorority, Golden Girls 
and Campus Crusade for Christ. 







* ' 


















i 
j 


■ 


V- \ 


JS^RM 


- m ..' n 



An elementary education major 
from Kokomo, ANGELA LEIGH 
BEAN is the daughter of Marti 
and Judy Bean. The Dean's List 
Scholar was a member of Golden 
Key National Honor Society, 
Student Alumni Association, 
USM 1 Club and Tri Delta Soror- 
ity. 



EVERETTE L. BROWN, the 

son of Everette Lowe and Evelyn 
Brown, is a criminal justice major 
from Hempstead, N.Y. A Dean's 
List Scholar, Brown was president 
of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. He 
also received an All-Metro honor 
in track. 




A music education major rrom 
Hattiesburg, WESTLEY DON 
CAMERON JR. is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. Don Cameron. A 
member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfo- 
nia, Cameron was named out- 
standing freshman in the "Pride" 
and received first place in 
M.M.T.A. Concerto Division. He 
also served as an ASB senator. 



SALLY ANN DEES, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lock- 
hart F. Dees, served as ASB vice 
president and also was a member 
of Phi Mu sorority, Southern Style 
and Dixie Darlings. The journal- 
ism major also was vice president 
of Omicron Delta Kappa. 




52 Who's Who 




■ 







An accounting major from 
Mendenhall, AMANDA CARO- 
LINE DEWEESE is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Cockrell. She 
was the recipient of the University 
Leadership Scholarship and the 
Jcrold Morgan Scholarship. She 
served as president of Beta Alpha 
Psi and was a member of Gamma 
Beta Phi and Lambda Sigma. 



The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Roland W. Escher St., DEBRA 
DIANNE ESCHER is an elemen- 
tary education major from Pasca- 
goula. The President's and Dean's 
List Scholar served as secretary of 
Phi Delta Rho, treasurer of Rho 
Lambda and president of Chi 
Omega sorority. 



A radio, television and film ma- 
jor from Brandon, RICHARD 
DOUGLAS FRYE is the son of 
Cecil and Patricia M. Harper. A 
National Dean's List Scholar, 
Frye served as treasurer of Alpha 
Lambda Delta and state president 
of Gamma Beta Phi. He was a 
member of USM's Air Force 
ROTC and served as head resi- 
dent. 



The daughter of Lottie McMul- 
lin, MISSY LYNN GOWEN is 
an elementary education major 
from Hattiesburg. She was a mem- 
ber of Kappa Delta sorority, 
Lambda Delta Sigma, Gamma Al- 
pha Epsilon, Gamma Beta Phi and 
Phi Delta Rho. The President's 
and Dean's List Scholar served as 
vice president of her sorority and 
also was an ASB senator. 



TAMARA SUE GREMIL- 
LION, a psychology major from 
Bellevue, Wash., is the daughter of 
J. Stanley and Janene Gremillion. 
The National Dean's List scholar 
was a resident assistant and a 
member of Pi Beta Phi Sorority. 
She also was a recipient of the Ju- 
nior Panhellenic Scholarship 
Award. 




* I 



^ 




Who's Who 53 






A journalism major from Me- 
tairie, La., RICHARD A. HAM- 
MOND is the son of Vicky M. 
Hammond. Hammond served as 
editor, columnist and staff writer 
at the Student Printz. He also was 
named a Top Five Outstanding 
Freshman Male and was a mem- 
ber of Omicron Delta Kappa. 



MICHELLE RENEE JER- 
OME, a speech communications 
major from Hattiesburg, is the 
daughter of Raoul and Althea Jer- 
ome. Michelle was a member of 
Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Phi Delta Rho and Order of 
Omega. She also was ASB student 
relations director and assistant 
special projects director. She also 
was a member of Lambda Sigma 
and Delta Gamma sorority. 



A hotel restaurant administra- 
tion major, DAVID LEBLANC is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gerard 
F.S. LeBlanc, Jr. of Plaquemine, 
La. This Dean's List Scholar was a 
member of the Outstanding Col- 
lege Students of America, Hotel 
Sales Marketing Association, Stu- 
dent Alumni Association and Al- 
pha Tau Omega Fraternity. 



The daughter of Mack and Betty 
Lofton, KARIN DEE LOFTON is 
majoring in business education. The 
Dean's List Scholar was president of 
Tri Delta Sorority, a Campus Beau- 
ty and Student Body Homecoming 
Maid. A recipient of the Junior Col- 
lege Achievement Scholarship, Lof- 
ton was a member of Rho Lambda, 
Order of Omega, Phi Beta Lambda, 
Rotaract and Phi Theta Kappa. 



KENNETH MORGAN 
McCARTY, the son of Dr. and 

Mrs. Ken McCarty, is a banking 
and finance major from Hatties- 
burg. The National Merit Finalist 
was the recipient of the Wall 
Street Journal Award. McCarty 
served as president of Sigma Chi 
fraternity and was a member of 
Omicron Delta Kappa and Phi 
Kappa Phi. 





54 Who's Who 






The son of Mr. and Mrs. Jean C. 
Meyer, JOHN SCOTT McNAL- 

LY is a business administration 
major from New Orleans. The Na- 
tional Dean's List Scholar was 
named an Outstanding Freshman 
and also a member of Southern 
Style, the Student Alumni Associ- 
ation. McNally served as Alpha 
Tau Omega's rush captain. 



A marketing major from Petal, 
ROBERT D. PIERCE II is the 

son of Robert Pierce and Peggy B. 
Pierce. He served as president of 
the Interfraternity Council, trea- 
surer of the Student Alumni Asso- 
ciation and president of Phi Eta 
Sigma. He also was a member of 
Omicron Delta Kappa and Sigma 
Chi fraternity. 



The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
David R. Rich, ASHLEY M. 
RICH is pursuing a degree in 
speech communication and parale- 
gal studies. She served as an ASB 
Senator and homecoming director. 
Rich also was a member of Chi 
Omega sorority. 



JONATHAN MICHAEL 
RICHARD, the son of David and 
Carolyn Engle and Terry Richard, 
is an economics major. Selected 
for Outstanding Young Men of 
America, Richard served as ASB 
attorney general and treasurer and 
chronicler of Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
fraternity. He also served on nu- 
merous committees, including the 
University Publications and Pub- 
licity Board. 



The daughter of Curtis and 
Alva Lee and wife of Patrick 
Scheuermann, SARAH MELIS- 
SA LEE SCHEUERMANN is a 
journalism major from Picayune. 
The President's and Dean's List 
Scholar served as president of the 
Public Relations Student Society 
and was a member of Gamma Beta 
Phi. 





Who's Who 55 






A computer science and statis- 
tics major from Biloxi, BILL 
GERARD SCHLICHER is the 
son of Elmer and Juanita 
Schlicher. Schlicher was chosen a 
Top Five Outstanding Freshman 
Male and was a member of Sigma 
Nu fraternity and served as vice 
president of Gamma Beta Phi and 
secretary of Alpha Lambda Delta. 



The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilbur C. Smith, CHERYL 
LYNN SMITH is an elementary 
education major from Winter 
Park, Fla. The Dean's List Scholar 
was a member of the Pride, the 
Symphonic Band and the Concert 
Band. She also was a member of 
Tau Beta Sigma, Gamma Beta Phi 
and Angel Flight. 



BILLY WAYNE STEWART 
JR., the son of Billy and Linda 
Stewart, is a history major from 
Pearl. The President's List Scholar 
served as president of Southern 
Style, director of ASB Student Af- 
fairs and president of Lambda Sig- 
ma. He also was a member of Sig- 
ma Chi fraternity, the Student 
Alumni Association and Omicron 
Delta Kappa. 



A business administration ma- 
jor from Cary, FRANCELIA 
RENA WILLIAMS is the daugh- 
ter of Willie T. and Lue Julia Wil- 
liams. The Honors College student 
was a member of Rho Lambda, 
Alpha Lambda Delta and Alpha 
Kappa Alpha sorority. A Presi- 
dent's and Dean's List Scholar, 
Williams was the recipient of the 
Academic Excellence Award. 



MARK BRIAN WILLSON, 

the son of Troy and Barbara Will- 
son, is an accounting major from 
Picayune. The National Dean's 
List Scholar was a member of 
Gamma Alpha Epsilon, Order of 
Omega, Geta Alpha Psi and 
Southern Style. He also served as 
president of Pi Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity and was a member of the 
ASB Student Judicial Board. 





56 Who's Who 




The daughter of Dewey and 
Robbie Wise, CHARLOTTE 
RAE WISE is a history major 
from Biloxi. An Honors College 
student. Wise was a member of 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Golden 
Key National Honor Society, Tau 
Beta Sigma and Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha sorority. She also was in the 
Pride and the Honorary Band So- 
rority. 



REBECCA LYNN WRIGHT, 

the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam M. Wright, is a journalism 
major from Jackson, Ala. An Hon- 
ors College student, Wright was a 
member of Omicron Delta Kappa 
and Lambda Sigma. She also 
served as an ASB senator in addi- 
tion to being vice president of Del- 
ta Delta Delta sorority. 



An accounting major from Pet- 
al, MELANIE SUZANNE 
YEATMAN is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Robert Ham- 
mons II and Gene Yeatman Sr. 
Yeatman was a member of Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, Golden Key 
National Honor Society and Phi 
Delta Rho. She also served as 
president of Delta Delta Delta so- 
rority. 





Who's Who 57 



Ten 
Campus 
Beauties 




A(Above) Kelli Cartee, Darla Daniels, Shana Hutto, 
Danyel Kea and Alicia McDaniel. • Photo by Barry Beard 



58 Campus Beauties 



▼(Below) Margaret Pinson,Toni Price, Monica Scruggs, 
Tori Scully and Shelly Traxler. • Photo by Barry Beard 




Picture Perfect 



Like most universities in the 
South, the Student Body at South- 
ern elects Campus Beauties. The 
only requirements are: to be fe- 
male and a USM student. No can- 
didate who has already been a 
Campus Beauty is eligible to run 
since a Campus Beauty is a con- 
tinuing designation. The candi- 
dates must fill out an application, 
attach a photo and return both to 
the ASB office. All candidates are 
screened by a panel of judges who 
will choose 20 to appear on the bal- 
lot. The 10 candidates with the 
highest number of votes receive the 
title of Campus Beauty. This year 



there were 351 applicants. 

This year's beauties are: Kelli 
Cartee, a junior from Gulfport; 
Darla Daniels, a junior from Po- 
plarville; Shana Hutto, a freshman 
from Waynesboro; Danyel Kea, a 
junior from Carthage; Alicia Ma- 
Daniel, a freshman from Hatties- 
burg; Margaret Pinson, a fresh- 
man from Hattiesburg;Toni Price, 
a sophomore from Mendenhall; 
Monica Scruggs, a freshman from 
Hattiesburg; Tori Scully, a fresh- 
man from Long Beech; and Shelly 
Traxler, a freshman from Magee. 
[*| By Lorna Freeman 



Campus Beauties 59 



► (Right) And the new Miss Southern for 

1990 is Miss Danyel Kea! • Photo by John 

McLemore 

▼(Below) Danyell Kea crowned as Miss 

Southern for 1990. 





► (Right) Presenting Miss Southern and 
the top four finalists. 




60 Pageant 




▼(Below) Danycl Kea singing for her tal- 
ent in the Miss Southern pageant. ▼(Bot- 
tom) Shelly Gary's performance in the 
Miss Southern Pageant. • Photos by G.M. 
Andrews and U.S.M. Public Relations 



Not An Easy Choice 



A line up of beautiful, talented 
young women paraded the stage 
of the Mannoni Performing Arts 
Center on Saturday, January 20, 
to compete for the title of Miss 
Southern. After being held off- 
campus for the past two years, 
pageant directors decided to 
move the pageant back to cam- 
pus for the students. 

Seven contestants competed in 
the areas of swimsuit, talent, 
evening gown and interview, but 
only one woman could walk away 
with the crown. Blonde-haired, 
green-eyed Danyel Kea of Car- 
thage, Miss, received the title of 
Miss Southern after winning the 



swimsuit competition and talent 
preliminary. Alternates were 
Valerie Gordon of Meridian, 
Shelli Gary of Biloxi, Shea 
Broom of South Carolina, and 
Penny Smith of Pascagoula, who 
received the Director's Award. 

Master of ceremonies was Ken 
Waltman, who graduated from 
USM and directed the pageant in 
1984. Entertainment was pro- 
vided by Leah Friend, Miss 
Southern 1989, Raoul Jerome 
and the Miss Southern Orchestra 
and USM's Southern Exposure. 
The students of Delta Gamma 
sorority served as hostesses. 
| By Heather McKee 




Pageant 61 



- 



► (Right) The overview of the fall gradu- 
ation. 









► (Right) Dr. Art Kaul, Valerie Andrews 
and Ed Wheeler of the Journalism Depart- 
ment talk before the opening ceremonies 
begin. 

A(Above) Sen. Thad Cochran speaks at 
the fall commencement exercises. 




62 Graduation 






I 






▼(Below) Graduating senior Mike Doyle 
smiles for the camera with his parents. 
▼(Below) This photo speaks for itself. 



iglOHi atits 






'•'••■' • '•'~?*ffl./r<t' 'I/in/- 



:«.* 



ft; 








A Memorable Ceremony 



"There are three types of peo- 
ple in this world. People who 
watch what happens, people who 
make it happen, and people who 
wonder what happened."' Those 
were the words of Senator Thad 
Cochran to about 1,000 graduat- 
ing students at the fourth fall 
commencement. 

Among other things, Cochran 
spoke of the world as being on the 
"threshold of a new era." He was 
speaking of the fall of the Iron 
Curtain in Eastern Europe. He 
cited these occurences as "signal- 
ing the strength of democracy." 
For this, Cochran called for the 



advancement of education to pre- 
pare future students for possible 
competition with ex-communist 
countries. 

After a moving speech, Coch- 
ran added that his work in Con- 
gress is responsible for program 
and research dollars, not with- 
standing the bill he put through 
for Southern's new Polymer Sci- 
ence Building. 

Twenty-five doctorial degrees 
were handed out along with 285 
specialists and master's degrees, 
and 695 bachelors degrees. 
| By Vincent Clark 




Graduation 63 





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72 Division Page 




Worth Our 
Weight In GOLD 




Academics 

At the University of Southern Mississippi, education is the golden opportunity of a 
lifetime. From the beginning, USM has held education as its primary lifetime goal. For 
this reason, many students decide upon USM as the university to continue their 
education. 

On March 30, 1910 the university was established by an act of the Mississippi 
legislature to train teachers for the rural schools in the state. Originally, USM was 
called the Mississippi Normal College. Since then, USM has provided more education- 
al opportunities and has grown considerably in size. Since 1910, USM has broadened 
into such areas as the College of Arts, the College of Business Administration, the 
College of Education and Psychology (probably the original Mississippi Normal Col- 
lege), the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Science and Technology, the College 
of Health and Human Sciences, Graduate School and most recently the Honors 
College. And USM is still growing, expanding and becoming better with age. 

With so many opportunities, it is easy to see why students choose USM. With so 
many colleges and programs, it's no wonder why many entering freshmen have a hard 
time choosing a field or area of study. But once a person becomes a student at USM, 
his/her heart, soul and mind are considered Worth Their Weight In Gold. 
■ By Vincent Clark 



Division Page 73 



The College of 
The Arts 



The College of The Arts provides students with a wide variety of 
courses and activities for self-expression in the arts. Besides being a 
center for academic excellence, the college also offers more than 250 
public concerts and recitals, theatre productions and art exhibits for the 
community, as well as for students and faculty. 

Comprised of the Department of Art, the School of Music and the 
Department of Theatre and Dance, the College of The Arts offers var- 
ious degree programs in music, music education, art and theatre and 
dance. More than 500 students enroll in these degree programs, and 
many more students opt to take arts courses designed for non-majors. 
i | By Tammy Petro 



A (Above) The College of The Arts offers 
students a variety of cultural activities. 
► (Right) Students practice for an upcom- 
ing recital. 




74 Academics 



▼ ( Below) A student carefully shapes a piece of pottery for a 

class assignment. 

•^ (Left) This music student practices for a concert. 




Dean Harold Luce 



Academics 75 



College of 

Business 
Administration 

The College of Business Administration provides students with a cur- 
riculum that prepares them for the growing global economy. Business 
students enroll in a balanced core of liberal arts, science and business 
courses. 

The college offers degree programs in accounting, economics, and 
international business, finance and general business, management and 
marketing. 

The business faculty are not only involved in research and teaching 
activities, but also serve as consultants on community projects designed 
to promote economic development in the state. 

«S1P 







*i\ 



ElhiP 






A (Above) Joseph A. Greene Hall, alias 

the College of Business Administration 

(CBA). 

► (Right) Business students spend a great 

deal of class time taking notes. 



76 Academics 



•4 (Left) Students have access to computer 
terminals to complete papers and case stud- 
ies 

▼ ( Below) A must for a business student is 
a calculator to have on hand at all times. 




Dean Tyrone Black 



Academics 77 



College of Education 
and Psychology 

Not only does the College of Education and Psychology provide stu- 
dents with accredited programs in teaching and psychology, but it also 
supplies Mississippi's public schools with the necessary clinical and pro- 
fessional services. 

Students entering the college have many programs to choose from, 
including business education, industrial technology, psychology and so- 
cial and rehabilitation services. 

In addition to teaching and counseling students, the college's faculty 
also spend many hours promoting education and psychology research in 
their particular fields. 

Dean James O. Schnur said, "Over the past two years, enrollments 
and student credit-hour production in the college have increased over 20 
percent. We are very pleased with the vote of confidence in our programs 
which these increases represent." 




wsEa 






A (Above) This student and teacher are 
checking readings from a test program. 
► (Right) This enterprising psychology 
student takes time to adjust his machinery 
before beginning his next experiment. 




. 



78 Academics 






•^ (Left) Taking a break in the lounge gives 
students time to get off their feet and relax. 
▼ (Below) Student volunteers help psy- 
chology majors in their research projects at 
the USM Sleep Laboratory. 




Academics 79 



K ■*£& 



College of Liberal 
Arts 



"More people in business are 
recognizing the liberal arts as an 
essential part of the business 
world," said Dr. Terry Harper, 
dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts. 

Boasting one of the best schools 
of communications in the state, the 
College consists of 130 faculty 
members. Doctorates are available 
in the schools of communications, 
history, English, and speech and 
hearing sciences. More than 2,000 



students are majoring in some field 
of liberal arts. Moving ahead into 
the future, the College of Liberal 
Arts has a new program in Inter- 
national Studies and a renewed 
emphasis in foreign languages and 
philosophy. 

The college must see that stu- 
dents are prepared for the social 
and economic world and give stu- 
dents the incentive to broaden 
their minds outside of class. 



▲( Above) The College of Liberal Arts en- 
ables a student to enroll in a variety of 
courses in different academic areas. 

► (Right) Chantel Foretich, a journalism 
major, edits copy for the Student Printz. 




80 Academics 



EGE| OF LIBERAL ARTS 
r TOE OF THE DEAN 




•^(Left) The Dean's office is always open 
to better serve its students 
▼(Below) Radio Television and Film stu- 
dents work with a video camera for their 
beginning video class. 




A Dean Terry Harper. 



Academics 81 



College of Science 
and Technology 



Since the founding of the Col- 
lege of Science and Technology 
more than 20 years ago, it has 
grown at an incredible pace. The 
credit for this growth goes to facul- 
ty members of the college and their 
commitment to excellence in 
teaching, research and innovative 
knowledge. By combining these at- 
tributes with modern facilities, the 
College of Science and Technology 
continues to provide students with 
a quality education. 

Science, technology and math- 
ematics are combined in innova- 
tive programs designed to accomo- 
date 1 5 majors and 1 1 pre-profes- 
sional programs within 1 1 
academic departments. The Col- 



lege is divided into four institutes: 
Environmental Science, Microbi- 
ology and Related Sciences, Sur- 
face Coatings and the Mississippi 
Polymer Institute. The college also 
has the 1 2 departments of Biology, 
Chemistry, Computer Science and 
Statistics, Architectural Technol- 
ogy, Geology, Industrial Technol- 
ogy, Mathematics, Medical Tech- 
nology, Physics, Astronomy, Poly- 
mer Science and Science 
Education. 

The College now offers students 
more degree choices with the addi- 
tion of doctorial programs in com- 
putational science and marine sci- 
ence and a master's program in 
public health. 







-— ~ 



* 



* 



: 









**% 




A(Above) Dr. Lucas surveys the construc- 
tion with Dr. Thames and the architect. 

►(Right) Robert Pope works with new En- 
vironmental Scanning Electron Micro- 
scope, one of only seven in the country and 
twelve in the world. 




S2 Academics 



•^(Left) The new Polymer Science Build- 
ing became a reality. 

▼(Below) These students go the "extra 
mile" to retrieve a specimen for biology 
class. 




Acadmeics 83 



THE COLLEGE 

OF HEALTH AND 

HUMAN SCIENCES 



The College of Health and Hu- 
man Sciences was formed in 1989 
with the State College Board's ap- 
proval of a consolidation plan. 

The plan consolidated the 
Schools of Nursing, Social Work, 
Home Economics, and the School 
of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. The continuing goal of 
the college is community outreach. 

Today the College has more 
than 1 ,500 majors in four different 
areas of study including Social 
Work and Human Performance 
and Recreation. Students also 



study in the School of Nursing, 
which is currently ranked 24th in 
the nation among nursing pro- 
grams and boasts a state board 
passing rate of over 92%, the best 
for any collegiate nursing program 
in Mississippi. 

The State College Board recent- 
ly approved the college's request 
for an undergraduate Bachelor of 
Social Work degree. In addition, 
the College also established a mas- 
ters program in the area of Public 
Health. 



A(Above) Golfing students learn the tricks 
of the trade. ►(Right) Students work out 
in the Wellness Center. 



84 Academics 





A Dean Allison Yates 



Academics 85 



"-» 




Graduate School 



The University-of Southern 
Mississippi's Graduate School is 
undeniably an integral part of the 
collegiate structure. Developed in 
1947, the Graduate School caters 
to students desiring to advance 
their research or realm of free in- 
quiry beyond the undergraduate 
level. The size of the varying gra- 
duate programs, in general, is pro- 
portional to the professional de- 
mand within the department for 
competence beyond the baccalau- 
reate degree. Masters degrees are 
offered in nearly every recognized 



academic discipline. 

Admission to the program re- 
quires that an applicant know the 
specific program within the Gra- 
duate School they wish to study. 
They must have completed their 
baccalaureate work, take the nec- 
essary aptitude test, have a cumu- 
lative undergraduate G.P.A. of at 
least a 2.75 and be closely re- 
viewed and approved by the chair 
of the department in which the stu- 
dent intends to study, by the col- 
lege dean and by Graduate School 
Dean Robert Van Allen. 




', 









. ' :'. § - • V 




A(Above) The Graduate School is located 
in McCain Library. 

► (Right) Because of the intense reading 
load required in Graduate School, many 
graduate students find themselves in the 
library reading for hours. 




86 Academics 








*■- - 







^ 



•^(Left) Rosie Nettles works on a class 
project at her computer 
▼ (Below) A graduate student begins 
studying for an exam. 





A(Above) Students in the Graduate 
School must keep well informed during 
their tenuous course of study. • Photos by 
Gary Haygood 




A Dean Robert van Aller. 



Academics 87 



Honors College 



Since 1976, the Honors College 
has enrolled exceptional students 
in a vigorous program for study 
that challenges them to better pre- 
pare themselves for the future. Dr. 
Peggy Prenshaw, dean of the Hon- 
ors College, described the main 
goal of the honors program: "We 
want to offer a rich and varied ex- 
perience that will equip students 
for whatever they want to do for 
the rest of their lives." Overall, the 
Honors College extends to a select 
number of students the opportuni- 
ty to excel beyond what they might 
in other programs of study. 

A landmark even in the history 
of the Honors College and the uni- 
versity itself is the receipt of $1.5 
million dollar endowment from the 
Schillige-Baird Foundation. This 
grant, the largest in the history of 
USM, will be used to fund scholar- 
ships for outstanding students. 

Another program that separates 
the Honors College from the uni- 
versity as a whole is Colloquim, 



versity as a whole is colloquium, 
which interweaves philosophy, lit- 
erature and history into the three- 
hour course. This course, which is 
taught by a team of humanities 
professors from several depart- 
ments, is required of all honors stu- 
dents and instills in them a strong 
understanding of the ideas and 
events of the past have on today's 
society. 

The Honors College does uphold 
admission requirements which are 
somewhat stricter than the rest of 
the university. These requirements 
ensure that each entering class 
consists of a small number of ex- 
ceptional students who are willing 
to accept the academic challenge 
that the Honors College offers. In 
1989, for example, 98% of the en- 
tering honors freshman graduated 
in the top 20% of their high school 
class, and 25% of those were 
ranked first or second. With an 
average ACT score of 29, these 
students are indeed exceptional. 



A(Above) The Honors College promotes 
discussion between students on important 
issues. 

► (Right) Dean Prenshaw and Adminis- 
trative Assistant Dr. Marjorie Wheeler dis- 
cuss plans for the Honors College's future. 




88 Academics 



— *■ ^(Left) Students take notes during their 
colloquium session. 



iflwr^fM^ *y 




Academics 89 



Presidential Scholars 



In keeping with its policy of 
maintaining high academic stan- 
dards. Southern has recruited a 
group of elite students and bes- 
towed upon them the unique and 
prestigious title of Presidential 
Scholars. 

According to Buckey Wesley, 
USM director of the office of Re- 
cruitment, these students chose 
USM because they felt that it 
could serve their educational needs 
as well or better than more well- 
known universities. He added that 
these students come from Missis- 
sippi and other parts of the country 
have a wide variety of interests and 



activities that make them a valu- 
able addition to both the intellec- 
tual and social environment on 
campus. 

This past fall Southern admitted 
13 Presidential Scholars. With the 
scholarship comes a large respon- 
sibility for the students, both to 
themselves and to the school. 
Presidential Scholars are expected 
to maintain the same high stan- 
dards of excellence in academics, 
leadership and extracurricular ac- 
tivities that earned them their 
hard-won distinction. 
| By Jonathan Ingram 




Pascal Balthrop III 




Jamie Erin Smith 




Sean Patrick Scott George 



Hugh McDonald 



( «) Presidential Scholars 



■! 



m\ \ 




Bryant Duhon 



Errettc Hogrefc 



Ruth Guidry 




Suzi Foster 



Dana Lynn Sellers 



kritina Silva 




Jason Mevers 



Christopher Tilley 



Francis Toche 



Presidential Scholars 91 



^f.. ■ : *<** 



r 







92 Division Page 



\ <\\ 



<Y 



44 

ftGLE 



mm 



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mmmm 



A( Above) Marcus Cro 

bound. • Photo by Kevin Looper 

► (Top Right) A member of the Soccer 
gets a leg up on an opponent. •Photo by 
Gary Haygood 53 Wd 

► (Right) Head Coach Curley Hallman 
and Sports Information Director Regiel 
Napier wait for the media following the 
Golden Eagles' surprise victory over Flor- 
ida State. • Photo by G.M. Andrews 



•' t - k 



* 




■ \ %h : #A 



it 











-*.: - /^3% 



Worth Our 

Weight In GOLD 




SPORTS 



When most people think of col- 
lege, they think of sports. In fact, 
sports plays a major role in most 
colleges in this country. Here at 
USM, we do not just play sports — 
we play to win. Although we have 
had our off and on years, Southern 
has always lended its pride and 
support to the Golden Eagles. 

With the infamous phrase "You 
Practice Like You Play," USM 
has one of the most motivational 
programs in the state. Whether or 
not we have a losing season, prac- 



tice goes on in hopes that next year 
will be better. Fans support our 
teams with a vigor rarely seen in 
professional or high school teams. 
So after practice, when it's time to 
hit the field, the fans are there. 

With all the practice and sup- 
port our teams get, it is easy to see 
why they are called the Golden Ea- 
gles. Because to students and die 
hard fans, they are "Worth Their 
Weight in GOLD." ■ Vincent 
Clark 



Division Page 92 



► (Right) QB Brett Favre throws on the 
run during the Eagles' upset victory over 
the Seminoles of Florida State. 

▼(Below) Free Safety Kerry Valrie comes 
down with an interception in USM's big 
win over East Carolina. 




^(Left) Defensive tackle Peter Antoniou 
celebrates a USM fumble recovery during 
the Homecoming loss to USL. 
A(Above) Kick return specialist Tony 
Smith heads downfield against Florida 
State. 

► (Right) Fullback Ron Howell shakes off 
a would-be ECU Pirate tackier. • Photos by 
G.M. Andrews 



94 Football 



FOOTBALL 1989 



The University of Southern 
Mississippi's gridiron squad 
rode the proverbial "tough 
schedule" rollercoaster during 
their 1989 campaign. 

The 1988 version of the Gold- 
en Eagles had rolled to an 11-2 
final season tally, including 38- 
18 Independence Bowl victory 
over the Miners of the Universi- 
ty of Texas at El Paso. 

The 1989 squad was to play 
without punt return specialist 
James Henry and tailback 
Sheldon Gandy, both of whom 
graduated. 

Anticipations for a season of 
greatness rested upon the shoul- 
ders of a quarterback that may 
be the most prolific passer in 



Golden Eagle football history. 

Junior QB Brett Favre was 
being pumped by local media as 
a candidate for the Heisman 
Trophy. But before the '89 sea- 
son was over, Favre's hopes of 
bringing the Heisman home to 
Hattiesburg were dashed by the 
Eagle's 5-6 final record. 

The 1989 Golden Eagle sea- 
son began Labor Day Weekend. 
While many across the land 
were tuned into Jerry Lewis, 
many in the South tuned into 
WTBS to watch the Eagles take 
on perenial power and long- 
time rival Florida State. With 
USM as the "home" team in 
the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, 
Fla., Golden Eagles overcame 



the decidedly pro-Seminole 
crowd, 108-degree heat and 
Florida State's first-half lead to 
win, 30-26. 

Bouyed by their major upset 
of a Top Ten team, the Eagles 
returned to Hattiesburg to find 
themselves ranked as high as 
18th in some polls. 

The preparations for the next 
foe, the Mississippi State Bull- 
dogs, began in earnest. Head 
Coach Curly Hallman ran the 
squad through a week of closed 
practices as the team readied 
themselves for the return of for- 
mer Eagle Head Coach Jim 
Carmody, now the Bulldogs' 
defensive coordinator. 




Jock 
Talk 



RED DOG — linebacker blitz. 

FUMBLE -- ballcarrier loses 
possesion of the pigskin. 

QB SACK - - quarterback is 
tackled behind the line of scrim- 
mage. 

I By Lorna Freeman 



Football 95 




96 Football 



The rare, sellout crowd of 34,189 packed 
into M.M. Roberts Stadium watched as the 
bitter rivals traded scores until the score stood 
at 23-23. With 1:18 left, the Bulldogs got the 
ball and started driving downfield. Then, with 
four seconds left, MSU's Joel Logan kicked a 
34 yard field goal to put the game away, much 
to the disappointment of Eagle fans. Bulldog 
supporters stormed the field and Carmody was 
carried off on MSU player's shoulders. 

The second contest of the season seemed to 
inflict a mortal wound in the psyche of the 
Golden Eagle squad. USM stood at 1-1 and 
travelled to Auburn to try to upset the 5th 
ranked Tigers. 

But the men from the plains of Alabama 
had other ideas, and the powerful Auburn of- 
fense manhandled the Eagles, 24-3. 

Turning their view from the east to the west, 
the Eagles set their sights on two Texas schools 



in order to turn their season around. 

The Horned Frogs of Texas Christian Uni- 
versity were USM's first Lone Star State op- 
ponent. TCU tried to be gracious hosts, giving 
the Golden Eagles four second-half turnovers, 
but Favre and company couldn't capitalize on 
the Horn Frogs' miscues and fell to TCU 19- 
17. 

The 1-3 Eagle gridsters returned again to 
Texas, this time to play Coach Hallman's 
Alma Mater, Texas A&M. But the Home- 
coming for Hallman was a rude reception. 
Favre's 21-of-42 passing completions for 303 
yards and an 80-yard TD bomb to Ron Baham 
were for naught. 

The 22-ranked Aggies ran almost at will 
and the Eagles self-destructed, coughing up 
the ball three crucial times which sealed 
USM's fate at Kyle Field as the Aggies ran 
amok, 31-14. 




Jock 
Talk 



INTERCEPTION - - defen- 
sive back catches a pass intend- 
ed for an offensive receiver. 



DIG FOR THE BALL 

defensive linemen do. 
| By Lorna Freeman 



what 



Football 97 



► (Right) Tailback Eddie Ray Jackson fights 
his way upfield as he open running room. 
• Photo by G.M. Andrews 
▼ (Below) Golden Eagle fans show their sup- 
port to the WTBS cameras at the USM-Flor- 
ida St. game. • Photo by Gary Haygood 



JP- 



N%. 



.hreeAmigos tS 







-A 



T 






A (Above) QB Brett Favre heads for a first down during the 
Eagles' victory over the Tulane Green Wave. • Photo by 
G.M. Andrews 

•^ (Left) Running back Rickey Bradley scores a big "six" 
against Florida St. in USM's upset of the Seminoles. 
• Photo by Gary Haygood 



98 Football 



The 1989 USM Football Team 











A 



m 



T" 



mm 



fiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



I 



HiM 



ri • w«~ — • - 



High Hopes 



The 1-4 Eagles started a losing season in the face before the season had fully matured, a situation that 
fans, players and coaches alike had not counted on. With September over, the Golden Eagles looked to 
the month of October to turn their luck around. 

USM's luck did improve, and the Golden Eagles kicked the new month off by bumping off Tulane, 30- 
21. Tony Smith set a Roberts Stadium record in the first quarter by running a kick-off 80 yards for a 
touchdown. 

The Golden Eagles took a road trip to Louisville to play the University of Louisville. The featured foes 
played to a 10-10 tie with six seconds left in the game. But Brett Farve threw up a pass and a prayer as 
time ticked off. The ball was tipped, the prayer was answered, and the ball caught by Darryl Tillman on 
ithe run at the 25 yard line, who then raced in for the Eagles' Hail-Mary victory, 16-10. 

IThe 3-4 Eagles returned to Hattiesburg to welcome alumni and the Ragin Cajuns of the University of 
Southwestern Louisiana for Homecoming. Eagle hopes were running high for a third consecutive victory 
I and a shot at evening the season record, but the Cajuns couldn't be contained. Like the USM-MSU tilt, 
I the opposition reigned at the end. With two seconds on the clock, USL's Mike Lemoine drilled a 50-yard 
field goal to put the Cajuns over, 24-21. 

USM set out to salvage a possible 6-5 season with a big win over Memphis State, but found their 
second trip to Alabama just as rough as the first. The Crimson Tide rolled and swamped the Eagles, 37- 
14 in Tuscaloosa. 

USM returned home to finish out the season. The Golden Eagles ended with a 42-27 thrashing of the 
Pirates of East Carolina, but had to settle with a 5-6 overall record. || By Mike Adams and G.M. 
Andrews 



Jock Talk 



Number Of Players — Two 
teams of eleven players. 

Run Action — Is a play in 
which the quarterback fakes a 
running play and then drops 
back to pass. 

History — College football be- 
came organized in 1876. Foot- 
ball began in the mid-1800's, 
when a game similar to soccer 
was played in the East. 

Time — College and profes- 
sional football are 60 minutes 
long. A game is divided into 
four quarters of 15 minutes 
each. || By Lorna Freeman 



Football 99 




Field goal 
basket. 



Regular two-point 



Length of game — It's in two 
halves of 20 minutes each. 
| By Lorna Freeman 



100 Men's Basketball 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 



The USM Golden Eagles en- 
tered the 1989-90 season picked 
by the experts to finish no better 
than fourth or fifth in the Metro 
Conference. The Eagles, how- 
ever, had other ideas. Led by 
returning starters Clarence 
Weatherspoon and Darrin 
Chancellor, the Eagles, with an 
improved Marcus Crowell and 
two junior college transfers 
Darron Jenkins and Russell 
Johnson, surprised everyone by 
finishing the season with a 20- 
12 record. They finished second 
place in the Metro Conference 
regular season and second place 
in the Metro Tournament. The 



Eagles also earned their first 
ever NCAA Tournament bid 
and squared off against La- 
Salle, who had the best record 
in the nation, in the first round. 
The Eagles could not pull out 
the game, but that in no way 
dampened what was a great 
year for Golden Eagle Basket- 
ball. 

The Golden Eagles played an 
exciting brand of basketball 
this season, earning the nick- 
name "The Surgeons of Slam" 
for their prowess around the 
basket and the frequency, preci- 
sion and definitiveness of their 
dunks. In fact, the Eagles fin- 



ished second in the nation in 
dunks behind only conference 
foe Louisville. 

Other highlights of the year: 
"Spoon" was named Metro 
Conference player of the year, 
M. K. Turk and "Spoon" were 
named MSWA coach and play- 
er of the year respectively, Dar- 
rin Chancellor was named sec- 
ond team All-Metro, the Eagles 
won the Blue Angel Classic 
Tournament in Pensacola and 
Darron Jenkins set a school and 
Metro record with 10 blocked 
shots in one game. All in all it 
was a very successful year. | 
By Joel Hammond 




A (Above) Russel Johnson wrestles for a loose ball with a 
Cincinnati Bearcat. • Photo by G. M. Andrews ► (Right) 
Guard Dallas Dale brings the ball upcourt against the De- 
mons of Northwestern Louisiana. • Photo by Kevin Cooper 



•^ (Left) Darrin Chancellor moves past an 
opponent. ▼ (Below) Marcus Crowell 
drives past a Louisville defender during the 
final of the Metro Tournament. • Photos 
by G. M. Andrews 




Spencer for a layup. • Photo by G. M. Andrews 



Men's Basketball 101 



USM OPPONENT 




Bonus — The second shot at a 
free throw. 

Three pointer — A goal made 
from 19 feet and 9 inches. 
i | By Lorna Freeman 



102 Men's Basketball 



▼ (Below) Darrin Chancellor and Daron Jenkins wait 
for the opposing offense to bring the ball down court. • 
Photo by G. M. Andrews 



80 


91 


Louisiana State 


95 


78 


Tennessee Tech 


85 


81 


Northeast La. 


76 


74 


Marshall 


66 


69 


Tenn. -Chattanooga 


78 


71 


Bucknell 


84 


73 


Auburn 


96 


67 


Northwestern La. 


82 


113 


Florida State 


83 


91 


South Alabama 


87 


85 


Virginia Tech 


77 


93 


Memphis State 


85 


65 


Arkansas State 


96 


91 


Appalachian State 


106 


104 


Southwestern La. 


75 


77 


New Orleans 


83 


76 


Cincinnati 


88 


105 


Louisville 


84 


72 


Florida State 


82 


65 


South Carolina 


93 


76 


Virginia Tech 


86 


82 


Memphis State 


80 


71 


Tulane 


62 


74 


South Carolina 


60 


62 


McNeese State 


70 


63 


Cincinnati 


92 


88 


Tulane 


71 


73 


Louisville 


81 


67 


Virginia Tech 


75 


73 


Cincinnati 


80 


83 


Louisville 


63 


79 


LaSalle 




Row One: Dallas Dale, Jerome Jones, Charlie Sullivan, Marcus 
Crowell, Darrin Chancellor, Ron Rembert, Russell Johnson. 
Row Two: Kelvin McGruder, Eddie Miller (Co-managers), E. 
L. "Doc" Harrington (Head Trainer), Bryan Caldwell, Robert 
Mclnnis (Assistant Coaches), Head Coach M. K. Turk. Ralph 



Moore (Assistant Coach), David Bounds (Equipment Man- 
ager), Steve Maples (Strength Coach), Mickey Hutton (Statis- 
tician), John Burrell (Student Assistant). Back Row: Clarence 
Weatherspoon. Newton Mealer, John Lacey, Daron Jenkins, 
Rickey Jones, Louis Bates. • Photo by USM Photo Services 



▼ (Below) Forward Clarence Weatherspoon applies the pressure 
as center Daron Jenkins tries to strip a Louisville Cardinal of the 
ball. ▼ (Bottom) Weatherspoon and a Cincinnati Bearcat go 
one-on-one for a rebound. • Photos by G. M. Andrews 




A (Above) Marcus Crowell skies for two over Louisville. A 
(Top) Metro Conference Player of the Year Clarence Weath- 
erspoon tries to win over a referee. • Photos by G. M. An- 
drews 



Men's Basketball 103 



Jock 
Talk 



Foul — When one player makes 
contact with another. 

Charge — The offensive player 
runs over the defensive player. 
| By Lorna Freeman 



104 Women's Basketball 



Women's Basketball 



I 
i 



Coach Kay James and the 
Lady Eagles came into the 
1989-1990 season with high ex- 
pectations. Four starters re- 
turned from the 1988-89 team 
that finished 25-6 and advanced 
to the NCAA tournament. 
These expectations were fully 
realized as the Lady Eagles won 
the Metro Tournament and 
earned their second straight trip 
to the NCAA Tournament. The 
Lady Eagles advanced to the 
second round of the tournament 
by handily defeating the Lady 
Tigers of LSU. In the second 
round, they faced Louisiana 



Tech, who at the time, was un- 
defeated and ranked number 
one in the nation. The Lady Ea- 
gles fought very hard and 
played with a lot of heart. Lou- 
isiana Tech prevailed and even- 
tually made it all the way to the 
final four. 

The Lady Eagles showed ear- 
ly in the year that they would be 
a force to reckon with by win- 
ning a tournament in Texas in 
which they beat the Lady Reb- 
els of Ole Miss. After this victo- 
ry, the Lady Eagles were given 
the respect they deserved in the 
form of a national ranking in 



the top 25. Fortunately, they 
didn't let things go to their 
heads, and they continued to 
win ballgames. The Lady Ea- 
gles remained in the Top 25 for 
the remainder of the season, 
climbing as high as 17 before 
the year was over. 

The Lady Eagles proved to 
have the winning formula this 
year. They showed that with a 
combination of hard work, tal- 
ent and determination, success 
will follow. Thank you Lady 
Eagles for a great season. 




A (Above) Sophomore guard Shelly Sanders watches as a Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati Lady Bearcat slides out of bounds with a 
loose ball. • Photo by G. M. Andrews 




•^ (Left) Senior guard Renee Magee drives past Lou- 
isville's Kelly Rose for a bucket. A (Above) Freshman 
forward Amy Diesburg scrambles for a loose ball in 
front of a charging Mississippi College player. • Pho- 
tos by G. M. Andrews 



Women's Basketball 105 



Jock 
Talk 



Traveling — The taking of ex- 
tra steps by the player after the 
dribble has stopped. 

Technical Foul — A player 
and/or coach receives this foul 
by doing something that is not 
nice. 
| By Lorna Freeman 



106 Women's Basketball 



T (Below) Senior forward Gina Griffin avoids pressure 
from a LSU Lady Tiger during the Lady Eagles' victory in 
the first round of the NCAA playoffs. • Photo by G. M. 
Andrews 



USM OPPONENT 



78 


57 


Southern Methodist 


64 


62 


Mississippi 


78 


55 


Central Florida 


70 


64 


Tenn. -Chattanooga 


82 


63 


Ala. -Birmingham 


89 


51 


Mississippi State 


63 


41 


McNeese State 


65 


70 


Louisiana State 


73 


53 


Mississippi College 


73 


60 


New Orleans 


78 


82 


Louisville 


64 


53 


Cincinnati 


73 


35 


Tulane 


85 


63 


Virginia Tech 


79 


68 


Ala. -Birmingham 


101 


61 


Memphis State 


77 


73 


Florida State 


69 


67 


South Carolina 


S3 


64 


Mississippi State 


74 


58 


Louisville 


79 


48 


Cincinnati 


88 


56 


Tulane 


62 


53 


Virginia Tech. 


76 


63 


Memphis State 


72 


97 


Florida State 


72 


82 


South Carolina 


93 


60 


Mississippi College 


84 


39 


Cincinnati 


90 


78 


Florida State 


95 


88 


South Carolina 


75 


65 


Louisiana State 


70 


89 


Louisiana Tech 





Row One: Brian Cooper (Student Trainer), Gina Griffin, An- 
gela Scott, Stacy Young, Angela Sanders, Shelly Sanders, Vera 
Perry, Amy Diesburg, Bernita Fountain, Susi Soulie (Student 
Trainer). Row Two: Pam Black (Manager), Renee Magee, 



Alexis Hall, Robin Jefferies, Christy Sullivan, Wendy Winston, 
Cindy Hannon (Graduate Assistant), Joye Lee McNelis (As- 
sistant Coach), Portland McCaskill (Assistant Coach), Head 
Coach Kay James. • Photo by USM Photo Services 



▼ ( Below) Rcncc Magee scrambles over a Lady Tiger to snag a loose ball in 
the NCAA playoffs. ▼ (Bottom) Alexis Hall outruns a Lady Bearcat for a 
basketball during a Metro Conference tilt. • Photos by G. M. Andrews 



▼ (Below) Guard Alexis Hall tries to grab a rebound from a Lady Choc. ▼ (Bottom) Gina Griffin 
grimaces as she tries to get a rebound. • Photos by G. M. Andrews 




Women's Basketball 107 




' * 



▼ ( Below) On the Mound, John Gilligan, a senior, 
in for the sign from the catcher. 
► (Right) Some of Fall Ball's games can be really 
cold for the players and a few loyal fans. 





+% a* 




A (Above) Bubba Hall looks for a few signals from the dug- 
out. 

^ (Left) It has long been a custom in baseball to shake hands 
with the other team. Here a few players carry out the tradition 
after an Intra-squad game. 



108 Fall Ball 



Wh o's on F irst? 

Fall Ball 



The boys of summer had a 
great fall season. The Eagles 
lost only two of the 10 pre-sea- 
son games. In addition to the 10 
games, the Eagles played four 
Intra-Squad games and prac- 
ticed many long hours. 

The Eagles are lucky to have 
16 returning players listed on 
the Roster. On the mound the 
Eagles have 13 talented arms 
including: Mike Anderson, 
Stacy Cameron, Mark Carson, 
Tommy Catanedo, Mickey Du- 
til, Michael Emmons, John Gil- 
ligan, Barry Jefcoat, Marc Ku- 
bici, Franky McLendon, Da- 
mon Pollard, Brad Skeen and 
Mitch Whittington. 

The infield looks good with 
Doug Benfiel, Scotty Bonds, 



Marc Carson, Brent Coveng- 
ton, Dack Dcmoruelle, Bubba 
Hall, Jon Jackson, Scotty Jur- 
ich, Chris Logan, Steve Rob- 
bins, Jason Simmons, Randy 
Spring, Kerry Valrie, Larry 
Wesson, Andy Woodard and 
Kevin Young. 

The outfield is really strong 
with Greg Cole, Chad Herbert, 
Todd Nace, Dammon Pollard, 
Chris Robbins, Brad Skeen, 
Kerry Valrie, Chad Van Koo- 
ten and Andy Woodard. 

At Pete Taylor Park a new 
facility will seat 1,600 in chair- 
back grandstand style and an- 
other 1,400-plus in existing 
bleacher seating to be re-posi- 
tioned down the first and third 
base line. In addition, a new 



pressbox and concession/ticket 
facility was expanded. 

"Em more excited than ever 
about the possibilities this new 
facility will offer our program, 
and, of course, about hosting 
the 1990 Conference Tourna- 
ment. It will be an event that 
will offer Hattiesburg and the 
surrounding area the very best 
in college baseball. And obvi- 
ously we feel that our new fa- 
cility will be second to none as 
we continue to make progress 
with the Golden Eagle baseball 
program," said Coach Hill 
Denson. Never count the Eagles 
out unless the umpire's thumb 
is raised on high. || By Lorna 
Freeman 




A (Above) An artist drawing of the new Stadium at 
Pete Taylor Park. 



USM OPPONENT 



7 


-2 


Carey 


5 


-2 


S. Alabama 


6 


-7 


Carey 


2 


-4 


Meridian CC 


5 


-6 


Carey 


9 


-1 


Carey 


4 


-3 


Carey 


4 


-2 


Carey 


4 


-2 


S. Alabama 


9 


-0 


Carey 


8 


-7 


Carey 



Jock 
Talk 



Oh-and-two count — No balls 
and two strikes. 



Two-and-oh 
no strikes. 



Two balls and 



Ump — Umpire 

Eye black — A black cream 
that is applied under eyes to re- 
duce sun glare. 



Fall Ball 109 



► (Right) Third baseman Kevin Young 
fires over to first to nip a Bulldog hitter 
trying to bunt his way on. 




110 Baseball 



Who's On Second? 



The Golden Eagles got off to 
a great season by walking away 
with the Louisiana Busch Chal- 
lenge. The Challenge was Mis- 
sissippi universities against 
Louisiana universities, baseball 
style. The series opened up with 
USM vs. UNO. Dammon Pol- 
lard pitched a complete game 
and the final score was USM — 
3, UNO - - 0. John Gilligan 
took the mound for the Eagles 
against Tulane. Gilligan also 
pitched a complete game which 
gave the Eagles the Victory of 
USM — 5, Tulane -- 3. The 
final game was pitched by 
Franky McLendon and Mark 
Carson, on relief. Chad Herbert 



got his first home-run off of a 
LSU pitcher. The final score 
was USM - - 5, LSU - ■ 1. 
USM won all three games in 
the Challenge. The other Mis- 
sissippi teams only picked up 
one each. 

Kevin Young led the Eagles 
by hitting a homer in the first 
season game played against 
MVSU. He now holds the 
school record for doubles in a 
season. Dammon Pollard, Mark 
Kubici and John Gilligan were 
all named Metro pitchers of the 
week. Chris Robbins has been 
named Metro Player of the 
Week. As a team, the Eagles 
played 22 complete games. 



February started out with a 
bang! At the end of the month 
the Eagles were 14-3. The 
month of March was slow and 
the record was 9-12. At the end 
of April things were looking up 
again, and the Eagles were 14- 
5. USM had the second seat in 
the tournament. This was the 
first year the Eagles hosted the 
Metro Tournament which 
brought in baseball fans from 
all over and big bucks for Hat- 
tiesburg. The members of the 
1990-91 Eagle ball club started 
a great tradition at Southern 
with their hot streaks and made 
all baseball fans proud. 




A (Above) Head Coach Hill Denson lets the umpire know what he thought of the call • Photo by G. M. Andrews 



Jock 
Talk 



Steal — An attempt by a base 
runner to advance one or more 
bases before the batter hits the 
ball. 

Balk — An illegal movement by 
the pitcher in an attempt to de- 
ceive a baserunner. There are 
thirteen official ways a pitcher 
can be called for a balk. The 
runner advances one base per 
balk. 

Dugout — Team areas found 
along the baselines to house 
players and coaches. 

Fast Ball — Fast balls at USM 
range from 73 miles per hour to 
98 miles per hour. 

Baseball 1 1 1 



► ( Right) Shortstop Brent Covington puts the tag on Florida State's Chris Brock in 
the second game of a doubleheader with the Seminoles. • Photo by G. M. Andrews 
▼ (Below) Larry Wesson slides into second to break up a double play by Southeast- 
ern Louisiana State. • Photo by Kevin Cooper 





> ^ B« awN ^ M:* l S! ! W ! !!wg< 



'" I' 'I"— Mi i ."in 



aw 

kf *id W <M m UFW' :; * 





A Row One: Randy Spring, Brent Covington, Greg Cole, Scotty Jurich, Jason Simmons, Chad Hebert, Mark Carson, Brad Skeen, Damon Pollard, Chris Logan, Mitch 
Whittington, Todd Nace. Row Two: Manager Amp Case, Jon Jackson, Marc Kubicki, Tommy Catanedo, Larry Wesson, Chris Robbins, Bubba Hall, Michael Emmons, Kevin 
Young, Stacy Cameron, Manager Kevin Gilbert. Row Three: Head Coach Hill Denson, Student Coch Damon lannelli, Mickey Dutil, Mike Anderson, Andy Woodard. Dack 
Demouelle, Barry Jel'fcoat, Chad VanKooten, Doug Benfiel, Frankie McLendon, Assistant Coach Charlie Gray, Assistant Coach Brian Rhees. • Photo by USM Photo Services 



12 Baseball 



USM OPPONENT 



6 





Mississippi Valley State University 


X 


5 


Mississippi Valley State University 


7 


2 


Mississippi Valley State University 


3 





University of New Orleans 


5 


4 


Tulane 


5 


1 


LSU 


7 


(. 


SLU 


4 


3 


SLU 


7 


X 


SLU 


6 


5 


JSU 


2 


10 


LSU 


9 


7 


Indiana 


5 


2 


Indiana 


15 


4 


Indiana 


7 


10 


NLU 


s 


5 


Alcorn State 


4 


3 


University of South Carolina 


1 


5 


University of South Carolina 


4 


5 


University of South Carolina 


7 


X 


Middle Tennessee State University 


5 


II 


Middle Tennessee State University 





4 


Kansas State 


9 


1 


Kansas State 


1 


3 


Kansas State 


2 


1 


JSU 


9 


1 1 


JSU 





7 


FSU 


6 


3 


FSU 


(. 


3 


FSU 


9 


11 


Southwest Missouri State University 


7 


23 


UNO 


9 


10 


Tulane 


13 


7 


Tulane 


5 


2 


Tulane 


4 


2 


MSU 


5 


10 


MSU 


4 


2 


University of Louisville 


l > 


2 


University of Louisville 


7 


3 


University of Louisville 


2 


3 


Ole Miss 


3 


5 


Memphis State University 


9 


1 


Memphis State University 


3 


4 


University of South Alabama 


3 


1 


Florida 


6 


9 


SLU 


9 


1 


Alcorn State 


X 


5 


MSU 


19 


4 


University of Cincinnati 


10 


6 


University of Cincinnati 


5 


1 


University of Cincinnati 
Ole Miss 

University of South Alabama 
Sam ford 
Sam ford 
UAB 
UAB 

Virginia Tech 
Virginia Tech 
Virginia Tech 




A (Top) John Gilligan brings the heat to Delta State. 
• Photo by G. M. Andrews 

A (Above) Marc Kubicki fires one in against the 
Wildcats of Kansas State. • Photo by Kevin Cooper 



Jock 
Talk 



Ball — A pitch that crosses the 
plate outside of the strike zone. 

Grand Slam — A home run 
with the bases loaded. 



Runs batted in. 



Curve Ball — A pitch thrown 
with an overhand snap delivery 
that has overspin. The overspin 
causes the ball to break down 
and away, as it approaches the 
plate. 



Baseball 113 



Jock 
Talk 



"Hum fire" — An exhortation 
used by players to motivate a 
pitcher to throw hard. 

Wormburner — A hard hit 
ground ball that hugs the 
ground and does not bounce. 

Twinkilling — A double play. 

Can 'o Corn — An easy fly ball. 



14 Softball 



Softball 1990 



Head Coach Helen Grant 
had the services of eight letter 
winners, including six starters 
to face a tough 50-game sched- 
ule for 1990 that included six 
home doubleheaders. 

Grant lost four players from 
last year's squad. 

Fourth-year-coach Grant 
said, "We have a lot of return- 
ing players that will definitely 



help our experience level. The 
new players we have added are 
very good athletes and are 
adapting well at this point. We 
have more power than before. 
We also added another pitcher 
who will add depth to our pitch- 
ing staff." 

The Lady Eagles played in 
seven tournaments during 
1990, six on the road. Of the 



grueling season, Grant said, 
"We have a pretty tough sched- 
ule this season. We play in three 
big tournaments and face some 
tough competition. We will play 
several top-25 teams in the re- 
gion and the nation. West Flor- 
ida is always ranked in the top 
five in NAIA every year." 




▲ Row One: Stacey Theobald, Michelle Mackay, Mitzie Sowell. Row Two: Wendi Lionetti, Colleen Wagner, Jill Vaughn, Tina 
Sharkey, Lisa Rushing, Amy Newland, Valerie Thornhill, Dawn Thompson, Trish Leidy, Joanna Albritton. 





■^ (Left) Senior Colleen Wagner drives through the pitch. 

T (Below) Amy Newland delivers a fast strike to an opposing batter. • Photos 
by G. M. Andrews 



• 



▲ (Above) Shortstop Michelle Mackay checks the defensive 
alignment of Delta State from third base. 

► (Right) The Lady Eagle infield comes together before a batter 
steps in. 









- > ^ 



«. 'A 




Softball 1 1 5 



► Middle blocker Laura Shlimon gets the 
glad hand from teammates Carla Luke 
(left) and Charlotte Harris. • Photo by 
Robert Youngblood 

▼ Junior middle blocker/hitter Melissa 
Trent skies to block an opponent's spike. 
• Photo by Phil Hendrix 






J»S. 




'';:' . . 















wmmmm 


.1 * " 


r 






■ ' 

■ -.$ 



H WVl 



A Defensive specialist Carla Luke digs for a ball during a 

match with the University of Louisiville. • Photo by G.M. 

Anurews 

•^ Coach Helen Grant registers a protest with the scorer as 

Assistant Coach Steve Zary looks on. • Photo by Robert 

Youngblood 



16 Volleyball 






Golden Eagle Volleyball 

HI 

The Volleyball Eagles went 20-26 against their competition and finished 
last in the Metro Conference with a first round loss to eventual conference 
champion, Florida State, in 1989. It was a tough year, but the Eagles took first 
place in their Golden Eagle Classic Tournament and finished second in tour- 
neys at Ole Miss, University of New Orleans, and Southeast Louisiana. Indi- 
vidual performances were led by: 
Hitting percentage — Laura Shlimon, Junior middle hitter 

Tammy Firth, Freshman outside hitter 
Kills (spikes) — Amy Sutt, Junior outside hitter 

Melissa Trent, Junior middle hitter 
Assists (setting) — Stephanie Barth, Junior setter 

Charlotte Harris, Freshman setter 
Blocks — Melissa Trent, Junior middle hitter 

Laura Shlimon, Junior middle hitter 
Service Aces — Amy Sutt, Junior outside hitter 

Tammy Firth, Freshman outside hitter 
Digs — Amy Sutt, Junior outside hitter 

Carla Luke, Junior defensive specialist 
Volleyball is a dynamic and emotional game, and the six returning seniors 
are looking forward to a demanding 1990 schedule. They say it will be their 
year to fly high! || By Steve Zary 




• - - 




A Here we are, the '89-'90 USM Vol- 
leyball team. • Photo by USM Photo 
Services 



A Row One: Tammi Firth, Ginny Crowe. Row Two: Mareta Iosia, Melissa Trent, Stephanie Barth, Amy Sutt, Charlotte Harris, 
Laura Shlimon, Carla Luke. Not pictured, Jackie Navo. • Photo by Photo Services 




Pass — Positioning the ball for 
a set. 

Set — Positioning the ball for 
an attack (spike). 

Dig or Up — Exceptional back- 
court defensive play. 

Roof or Wall — A good block. 



Volleyball 117 



► (Right) Dina ViViano spins her racket while 
switching sides in a match. ▼ (Below right) 
Pete Hagar can't ever seem to land on his feet 
when he hits the ball. T (Below) Kim Clark 
drills a forehand to defeat her opponent. 



1989-90 USM Tennis Highlights 

Third Place — Metro Conference 

Tournament Team Competition. 

Two Metro Conference Singles 

Champions: 

Chris Hayden at Number 2 singles 

Anders Lindh at Number 5 singles 





A (Above) The tennis version of a "GQ" sexy legs 
pose: Chris Hayden, Fernando Landman and Gar- 
rett Prins. ► (Right) Typical practice day Coach 
Viator lecturing on Chris's volleys while Mark Ne- 
caise grimaces in frustration in the background. 



18 Tenn 



-'II MIS 




USM Tennis Teams 



The USM men's and women's tennis teams 
began the season with many experienced play- 
ers, as well as some strong newcomers. The 
men finished the season with a number three 
Metro Conference ranking and came away 
with two singles champions. Senior Anders 
Lindh from Sweden has been a consistent 
strength to the Golden Eagles for four years, 
playing number 4-6 for USM. Chris Hayden, 
a freshman from Mobile, Ala. played number 
1 and number 2 for USM this year. Garret 
Prins, a freshman from Ontario, Canada, 
comes to Southern with a ranking of number 6 
in Canada and in the top 30 internationally. 

Other members of the team include fresh- 
man Mark Necaise, who was ranked number 2 
in South Carolina and played number 5 for 
USM; Fernando Landman, a sophomore 
ranked in the top 20 in Chile and playing num- 



ber 3 singles; Magnus Fagar, a senior from 
Sweden playing number 5 and 6; and Pete 
Hagar, a senior from St. Petersburg, Fla. who 
was a junior college All-American and played 
mostly number 4 and 5 for the Golden Eagles. 

The women are headed up by sophomore 
Dina Viviano of Pensacola, Fla. Dina played 
number 1 for USM and was ranked in the top 
1 5 in Florida. The second position was filled by 
sophomore Kim Clark, a strong doubles player 
from Fort Walton Beach, Fla. Mary Denton, a 
sophomore from Natchez, Miss., was a second 
year team member, playing number 5 and 6. 

Newcomers included freshman Ludmila 
Cosio in the number 3 singles position from 
Mexico City; Erica Nahrgang from Costa 
Rica in the number 4 spot; and Colleen 
Fabacher of New Orleans, La. || By Laurie 
White 





Row One: Colleen Fabacher, Dina Viviano and 
Erica Nahrgang. Row Two: Ludmila Cosio, Kim 
* Clark and Mary Denton. 



. - "i 



■ 



A (Above) Emotions vary during in- 
tense competition. Mark Necaise and 
Pete Hagar jokingly talk while Chris 
Hayden and Fernando Landman seem 
disgusted about their play. 



Jock 
Talk 



Tag - - To hit another player 
with a ball to win the point. 

Hook — To intentionally cheat 
on line calls and be subject to 
getting punched by your oppo- 
nent. 

"In the zone" — To play over 
your head (only happens on oc- 
casion). 

Choke — To lose a match you 
should have won and hum your 
racket over the fence. 



Tennis 119 



Jock 
Talk 



Par — the number of strokes it 
should take to get to the hole. 

Bogie — one over par. 

Birdie — one under par. 



1990 USM Golf 



With six of the top seven 
players returning this season, 
the Golden Eagles Golf Team 
has done well for yet another 
year. Steve Summer, averaging 
73.7 strokes a match, was one of 
the Eagles' key players. He fin- 
ished second in the Mardi Gras 
Invitational and was a medalist 
in the Senior Bowl Champion- 
ship. Freshman Chandler Russ 
tied for eighth in the Mardi 
Gras Invitational and tied elev- 
enth with team member Carl 
Phillips in the Senior Bowl 
Championship. Miguel Alza- 
mora, a walk-on from last sea- 
son, tied for second in the UAB 
Invitational with a three-round 
score of 218. Cliff Wagner tied 
for seventh in the UNO Colle- 
giate Classic. Scott Murray had 
a score of 75 in the Mardi Gras 
Invitational, while Lance Reed 
had a three-round score of 241. 
As for next year, Coach James 
Ray Carpenter II said, "We 
continue to make progress each 
year. Hopefully, next year will 
be as profitable for the Eagles 
as it was this year." | | By 
Vincent Clark 



▼ (Below) Lance Reid makes an attempt to get his ball out of the sand trap. 

▼ (Bottom) Left to right: Chandler Russ, Lance Reid, Richard Walsh, Miguel Alza- 
mora, Scott Murry, Cliff Wagner, Carl Phillips and Steve Summer. 





I 



120 Golf 





/ 



I 





-4 (Top left) Scott Murry checks the green 
for his final putt. 

▲ (Above) Richard Walsh watches in 
hopes that the ball will sink on this putt. 

•4 (Left) Lance Reid sinks a putt. 



Golf 121 







A (Top) A teammate helps a runner stretch out a bothersome leg cramp. 
A (Above) Runners work out at Hattiesburg High's track. 






Services 



122 Track and Cross Country 



Cross Country & Track 



^ (Left) Runners build themselves up by running "bleachers" at the D. I. Patrick 
Stadium at Hattiesburg High. ▼ (Below) Everette Brown prepares to take a hurdle. • 
Photos by Gary Haygood 




Although not a major sport at 
USM, track is one of the best. 
In 1989, Kenny Glenn won 
NCAA Ail-American honors, 
but the Track team has yet to 
practice on campus because of a 
lack of training facilities. 
Coach Marshall Bell has been 
at the helm for 1 1 seasons, and 
his staff consists of Doug 
Knight, who coaches Patrick 
Griffin in pole vaulting. 

At the Jaguar Collegiate 
Track Classic in Mobile, the 
men's track team finished sec- 
ond while the women took third. 
In the 1 10-meter hurdles, Ever- 
ette Brown and Sedgwick 
McCollum came in first, and 
Hope Calhoun of the women's 
team finished first in the 100- 
meter hurdle. Brown also 
placed first in the 400-meter 
hurdles; Kenny Glenn placed 
fifth in the high jump; and Mi- 
chelle Kelley placed second in 
the women's high jump. USM's 
overall points for the meet were 
59. 




A Row One: Teresa Ford, Angie Hyde, Marketta Liggins, Katrina Baggett, Equonda Bradley, Tamela Knight, Kim Huff. Row 
Two: Victor Williams, Nicole Barthes, Stephanie Brown, Lisa Chiplin, Michelle Kelly, Hope Calhoun, Paula Pugh, Michelle 
McRaney. Row Three: Mike Whitson, Bryant Henderson, Robert Ray, James Fenton, Don Warren, Parrish Jewell, Eric Solis, Bill 
Fontan. Row Four: Everette Brown, Jaquette James, Eddie Voynik, Robert Johnson, Corey Gordon, Fred Toplin. Norman Lewis, 
Gregory Cook. Row Five: Roy Broomfield, Jens Beck, Patrick Griffith. Shawn Leland, Chris Maxwell. • Photo by USM Photo 
Services 



Jock 
Talk 



Pole Vaulting — using a pole to 
escape the pull of gravity and 
hurl the user over the bar. 

100-Meter Dash — a competi- 
tive run for the length of 100 
meters, about 1 20 yards. 



Track and Cross Country 123 




Scrum — Position equivalent to 
football lineman. Scrums "tie- 
up" to fight for possession of the 
ball. 

Wing — Equivalent to football 
running backs. 



1 24 Rugby 



Rugby 1990 



The U.S.M. Rugby club, 
coached by James Heimdal, 
went through a rebuilding year 
after winning the Deep South 
championship two out of the 
last three years. Graduation 
had taken its toll and it took 
time for the new and inexperi- 
enced players to understand 
what was expected of them and 
how to get in accomplished. 

Rugby is a team sport that 
involves a great deal of practice 
and dedication. This years team 
grew closer as the year pro- 
gressed and by years end had 
acquired the experience and in- 
tensity to play competitively. 
The team has no seniors and 
fully expects to begin next sea- 
son where this one ended and to 
compete for another champion- 
ship. 

The teams most outstanding 
players included: Most Valu- 
able Player, Steve Kaminski; 
Most Improved, Ken Smith; 
Rookie of the Year, Charles 
Hawkins. 

The U.S.M. Rugby club is 
sponsored by U.S.M. Club 
Sports, Stokes Distributors and 
Miller Beer. 



▼ (Below) James Heimdal and J. B. Downs (with ball) link up to keep opponents from 
stripping the ball. 




! 



Row One: Alan Valko, Joe Roach, Ken Inman, Bill Socher, Ken Smith, J. B. Downs, Donald Gall, Clark Henegan, John Bishop. 
Charles Hawkins. Row Two: Chris Colomb, James Heimdal, Mike Purdy, Alan Hinton. Scott McCaffern, Kevin Thorn, Cal 
Gray, Mike Funk, Brian Saffle, Ned Benvenutti, Mike Leshe, Steve Kaminski. (Not Pictured) Scott Montague, Lonnie 
Stinnett. • Photo courtesy James Heimdal 




A (Above) Scrum-half Chris Colomb passes the ball away against LSU. 
•^ (Left) Alan Valko and Ken Smith wrap up a LSU scrum-half. • Photos 
by G. M. Andrews 



Rugby 125 







J* 






Just for Kicks 




A (Above) USM Soccer Club mem- 
bers hoist the Eagle Cup Trophy after 
the Eagles' 3-0 victory over Ole Miss. • 
Photo by O. Bradley Bounds 



Jock Talk 



Number Of Players 
teams of 1 1 players. 



Two 



Dropped Ball — The referee 
drops the ball onto the ground 
between opposing players. 



Back-Heel 
backward. 



To pass the ball 



History — A game similar to 
soccer was played in 400 B.C. 
by the Chinese. In the 1100's 
London children first played 
soccer in the streets. 

Time — Most games last 90 
minutes. 

| By Lorna Freeman 

1 26 Soccer 



The USM Mens' Soccer Club 
wrapped-up its 1989 campaign with a 
19-1-1 record, including back-to-back 
victories in the Southeastern Conference 
Invitational Tournament and the Eagle 
Cup. 

"It's not very often that a soccer team 
comes back from a 2- 1 deficit at the half 
and pulls it out," USM Head Coach 
Frank Glamser said of the come-back 
victory over the University of Tennessee 
in the S.E.C. tourney. "I think the most 
amazing thing about the whole game is 
the fact that we never lost our compo- 
sure, we just wouldn't quit . . . They in- 
vited the best clubs in the South and we 
were able to win all five games — that 
says something about the athletic qual- 
ity of our soccer club." 

After the S.E.C. victory, the Eagles 
capped-off the season with a 3-0 defeat 
of Ole Miss in the Eagle Cup at M. M. 
Roberts Stadium. 

"It was a really nice way to finish off 
the season," soccer club standout Robyn 



Jones said. "It'll be hard to repeat this 
kind of season next year, so I'm really 
going to enjoy this one." 

During Spring Break the team trav- 
eled to England for a 10-day recruiting 
and three-game exhibition trip, which 
was sponsored by the English Language 
Institute and organized by Tim Hudson 
of ELI. 

Winning four of its last five matches, 
including a 2-1 victory over LSU in the 
Eagle Cup, the USM Womens' soccer 
club finished its 1989 schedule with an 
overall record of 6-5-1. 

LeAnne Hawkins led the Lady Eagle 
scorers, and standouts Kathy Cason, 
Darla Moyle and Michelle MacKey 
helped pave the way for the Women's 
soccer club. Head Coach Stephen Park- 
er said he hopes the four-year-old pro- 
gram can develop and reach its 1990 
goal of being the Number One team in 
the southern region. H By Mike Adams 
and G. M. Andrews 



I 







A (Above) 1989-90 USM Men's Soccer Team, Row One: Paul Nettles, Denny Currier, Tim LaFramboise, Brian Hrabovsky, 
Robyn Jones, Stuart Cameron, Brian Dodd. Row Two: Assistant Coach Jaime Orellana, Jeff Moyle, Eddie Bourgeois, Stacy 
Walker, Mike Stephens, Richard Cottrell, Mark Stratton, Scott Hollis. Row Three: Coach Frank Glamser, David Bonson, Joel 
Duncan, Kevin Crosier, Tommy Cason, Jeff Pedigo, Kirk Shearer, Tim Davis. Not Pictured: Drew Boggan. • Photo by Andy 
Miller (USM Public Relations) 



^ (Left) Tommy Cason chases a loose ball to 
ensure a spring match. • Photo by G. M. Andrews 

▼ (Below) Defender Denny Currier charges for a 
goal against the Tennessee Volunteers. • Photo by 
G. M. Andrews 










■i 
r 



A (Above) 1989-90 USM Women's Soccer Team, Row One: Jill Vaughn, Missy Mathews. Melissa 
Muzzy, Kathy Cason (captain), Michelle Mackey, Julie Hall (captain), Jamie Mustain. Dabney Weath- 
erford. Row Two: Coach Stephen Parker, Zac. S. Parker (mascot), Darla Movie, Rene Sylvester, LeAnne 
Hawkins, Doris Wallace, Tracey Blackburn. Bonnie Cooper, Carla Cartwright. Assistant Coach Frank 
Herrmann. • Photo by Steve Zary 

•^ (Left) Brian Dodd maneuvers with the ball during 
Eagle Cup action. • Photo by Andy Miller (USM Public 
Relations) 



Soccer 127 



▼ (Below (Seymour at a football game. ► (Right) Tim Bailey stands on 
the sidelines between cheers. 




128 Cheerleaders 



CHEERLEADERS 

Leading the chants in the coliseum or on the football field are USM's cheerleaders. Through hours 
of tiring practice and long road trips, this enthusiastic group of students give their all to support the 
Golden Eagles — win or lose, rain or shine. 

The football cheerleading squad consists of six women and six men who cheered at all of the games. 
Two squads made up the basketball cheerleaders, with the "black" squad cheering at men's games, 
and the "gold" squad cheering at women's games. 

This was the year for many new arrivals in cheerleading. This year USM welcomed Bill Thallemer 
as a new coach. Bill came to Southern Mississippi from Notre Dame, where he coached a national 
championship cheerleading squad and was an instructor with the Universal Cheerleaders Association 
for nine years. Also new was a totally different "eagle suit" for our mascot, Seymour. Designed to 
more closely resemble a real eagle, the suit was presented to fans at a home football game. But 
Seymour wasn't the only one in a new outfit; the cheerleaders received new uniforms this year as well. 
| By Heather McKee 




► (Right) The Black Squad: Row One: Rachel Bodie, Brooke Mancuso, Kevin Foley, Krissy Baucum, Hope Corso, Dana Cowart. 
Row Two: Stan Jenkins, Greg Balser, Tim Bailey, Scott Dixon, Billy Smith, Jeff Magers. 



Jock Talk 



Partner — someone that you 
really can trust. This person is 
always at you side and ready to 
catch you. 

Chant — used to get the players 
and crowd fired up. 

Stunt — the stunts are usually 
preformed at athletic events. It 
shows off the cheerleaders 
physical ability. 



Cheerleaders 129 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 




A (Above) Even though it is a team sport, every- 
one wants to make the winning point. 

► (Right) Flag football is supposed to be safer 
than the real thing, but a lot of guys still went down 
in flames reaching for the flag. 



130 Inlramurals 



▼ ( Iklnw) These guys prove that intramural sports is not 
always fun and games. 




Enjoying fitness and fun 



The University of Southern Mississippi's 
Recreational Sports Department, a division 
of Student Affairs, invites everyone to par- 
ticipate in its action-packed, competitive 
intramural sports program. More than 40 
activities are offered featuring team, indi- 
vidual and dual competition. The program 
consists of the traditional sports of volley- 
ball, flag football, basketball and softball, 
to such innovative activities as whiffleball, 
walleyball, frisbee golf and innertube 
sports, to name a few. The program is open 
to all male and female undergraduate and 
graduate students, faculty and staff in resi- 



dence halls, fraternities, sororities and off- 
campus housing. This program is as varied 
as possible to offer each member of the uni- 
versity community the opportunity to par- 
ticipate regardless of ability. To equalize 
skill levels, competition is divided into the 
appropriate divisions of play. In addition to 
its participants, the intramural sports pro- 
gram employs a large number of students 
each year to aid in the conduction of the 
program. These students are employed as 
supervisors, sports officials, athletic train- 
ers, clerical help, artists, photographers and 
computer programmers. 



Intramurals 131 



► (Right) This SAE prepares to kick the ball to a 
teammate. 

▼ (Below) These die hards even participate in the 
rain. 




A (Above) Athletes realize the importance of 
stretching before a game. 



132 Intramurals 



► (Right) Players tense up in anticipation of 
where the ball will go next. 




▼ (Below) Charles Vice checks the alley before making his next shot. 





. mm» f t * >* ' «&**<* •* **" xjpMm0mi!M*im«m miimtl t mM4M 



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Intramurals 133 



GAMES PEOPLE PLAY 



Intramurals at USM play 
an important part in student 
social life. With such team 
names as the Haulers and 
others, it is easy to see that 
everyone is out to have fun 
when they play. But it goes 
beyond that. 

Intramurals allows stu- 
dents who do not normally 
play sports to get out and 
learn to compete while work- 
ing on a team. And team- 
work at USM means a lot. It 
is what allows teams like Salt 
& Pepper, Macho Men and 
others to win not only the 
school championship, but a 
chance at the regional and 
national intramural cham- 
pionships. And when they 
win there, we all win. It's all 
a part of what makes us 
"Worth Our Weight in 
GOLD." ■ By Vincent 
Clark 



▼ (Below) A Rugby player looks for an open receiv- 
er. 

► (Right) Possum Pi members are all over their 
opponents in Rugby. 




134 Intramurals 



▼ (Below) Flag Football players scramble for 
the sack 








*m* If l 
if v * 



«r»_» u>> t«r«r< f 







feHErlk/ 



"air* 





o 






Jf aUfc«# 




A (Above) Winning is easy if you have a good 
backhand. 



Intramurals 135 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 
CHAMPIONS 



FALL SEMESTER 1989 



SPORTS 


TEAMS 


INDIVIDUALS 


Bowling (Men) 
Bowling (Women) 


Kappa Sigma 
Alpha Delta Pi 




Volleyball (Men) 
Volleyball (Women) 


Kappa Sigma 
TBA 




Tennis Singles (Men) 
Tennis Singles (Women) 


Sigma Chi 
TBA 


Steve Wertz 
Cynthia Martinolich 


Flag Football (Men) 
Flag Football (Women) 


Possum Pi 
Latecomers 




Flag Football (CoRec) 


Salt & Pepper 




Punt, Pass & Kick 
Punt, Pass & Kick 


Sigma Chi 
Chi Omega 


David Bush 
Janet Sumrall 


Volleyball (CoRec) 


VSA 




Scottish Golf (Men) 


Independents 


Errett Hogrefe/ 
Ryan Emfinger 


Club & Putter Golf (Men) Independents 

Club & Putter Golf (Women) Alpha Sigma Alpha 


Bob Wales 
Leslie McQuagge 


Tennis Doubles (Men) 
Tennis Doubles (Women) 
Racquetball (Men) 


Macho Men 
Phi Mu 
Independents 


Damn Waugh/ 
Joe Gannon 
Chantell Caughmann/ 
Teresah Elliot 
Tim McGuire 


Mixed Doubles (CoRec) 


Independents 


Reuben McDowell/ 
Traci Selman 


Turkey Trot (Men) 
Turkey Trot (Women) 


Phi Kappa Tau 
Kappa Delta 




Turkey Trot (Men) 
Turkey Trot (Women) 


Independents 
Exercise Science 


Shane Loper/Steve 

Herring 

Michelle McRaney 


Floor Hockey (Men) 


Pi Kappa Alpha 




Wallyball (Men) 
Wallyball (Women) 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Phi Mu 


Guy Reedy/Jamie Peoples 
Laura Gray/Julie Moulds 



Ultimate Frisbee (Men) Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Sunday Night Football (Men) Robby's 



Halfcourt Basketball (Men) 

Division I 69ers 
Division II AFROTC 
Division III Just 4 Fun 




Halfcourt Basketball (Women)NVUS 




Badminton (Men) VSA 
Badminton (Women) Kappa Delta 


Nhan Phan 
Tynia Crews 



Weightlifting Meet (Men) Phi Kappa Tau 
Weightlifting Meet (Women) Phi Mu 



136 Intramural 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 
CHAMPIONS 

SPRING SEMESTER 1990 



SPORT 


TEAM 


INDIVIDUAL 


Bowling (CoRec) 


Sigma Phi Epsilon/Delta Zeta 




Basketball (Men) 
Division 1 
Division II 
Division III 


Posse 

Jam Daddy O's 

OFF 




Basketball (Women) 


Latecomers 




Basketball (CoRec) 


Salt & Pepper 




One-On-One Basketball (Men) 
One-On-One Basketball (Womer 


Runnin' Rebels 
) Latecomers 


Roderick Shabazz 
Tracy Stuart 


Hotshot Basketball (Men) 


Untouchables 


Steven Dunn 


Free Throw Basketball (Men) 


Sigma Chi 


Scott Rodgers 


Slam Dunk Basketball (Men) 


Posse 


Joseph Courtney 


Sports Trivia Bowl (Men) 


AFROTC 




Soccer (Men) 
Soccer (Women) 


Phi Kappa Tau 
International Relations 




Water Basketball (CoRec) 


Alpha Tau Omega/Little Sisters 




Whiffle Ball (Men) 
Whiffle Ball (Women) 


Phi Kappa Tau 
Chi Omega 




Softball (Men) 
Division I 
Division II 


Phi Kappa Tau 
Rippin' Dawgs 




Softball (Women) 


NVUS 




Softball (CoRec) 


Mixed Drinks 




Frisbee Golf (Men) 
Frisbee Golf (Women) 


Alpha Tau Omega 
Phi Mu 


Chris Smith 
Candace Richerson 


Water Polo (CoRec) 


BOB 




Easter Run (Men) 
Easter Run (Women) 
Easter Run (Men) 
Easter Run (Women) 


Phi Kappa Tau 
Independents 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Independents 


Eric Solis 
Sonya Dufrene 


Team Tennis ( Men) 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




Team Golf (Men) 


AFROTC 




Putt Putt Golf (Men) 
Putt Putt Golf (Women) 
Putt Putt Golf (CoRec) 


AFROTC 
Chi Omega 


Kerry Geroux 
Susan Cade 
Shelly Pace/Chuck 
Davidson 


Swim Meet (Men) 
Swim Meet (Women) 


BOB 
BOB II 




Triathalon (Men) 


Delta Tau Delta 




Triathalon (Women) 


Anonymous 





Intramural 137 





rf^.: 



r^ 





► (Right) Charles Vice, Chuck Wil- 
liams, Charlotte Roberts, and Clay Hil- 
ton complete a Training for Interven- 
tion Procedures by Service of Alcohol 
(TIPS) workshop. Kelly Baker, far 
right, director of USM's Drinking and 
Driving Reduction Program, presents 
certificates to these individuals. 
A (Center) Chi Omega Rush! 
▲ (Above) Delta Tau Delta's relish 
their win at Anchor Splash. 




1 38 Division Page 




%W k\ 




Worth Our 
Weight In GOLD 




Greeks 



"Party Pic!" . . . candlelights for sisterhood . . . Bid Day . . . Krystal or Taco Bell or 
Shoney's or 1HOP at 1 A.M. . . . Flag-poling . . . painted party cups . . . Sigma Chi 
Derby Days . . . largest Sorority rush . . . Conventions . . . Mr. and Miss USM . . . 
getting dropped . . . Chi Omega Songfest . . . road trips to New Orleans and Jackson . . . 
blind date parties ... Pi Kappa Alpha and Phi Mu calendars . . . study halls . . . signs in 
the elevator . . . the return of Kappa Alpha Psi and Omega Psi Phi . . . Superbowl 
Parties . . . Sigma Chi groundbreaking ceremonies . . . Greek Week . . . philanthropies 
. . . pep rallies . . . rush workshops . . . recolonization of Alpha Sigma Alpha . . . watch- 
ing movies in the chapter room . . . hanging out at The HUB ... a wardrobe of party t- 
shirts . . . Delta Gamma Anchor Splash . . . Big Sisters, Little Brothers, Little Sisters, 
Big Brothers . . . initiation ceremonies . . . Homecoming float building . . . intramurals 
. . . Step Shows . . . Alpha Tau Omega MDA Bowl . . . greek letters on EVERY- 
THING! . . . pledge tests . . . fire drills at Panhellenic . . . Social Rules . . . Friday night 
swaps . . . leadership . . . loyalty . . . secrecy . . . friendship . . . sisters and brothers for 
life . . . 

Greek Life at the University of Southern Mississippi is a lifestyle: leaders on campus 
in service and scholarship, lifelong brotherhood and sisterhood, a strong bond of friend- 
ship, a motto, a grip, a badge and a tradition of the highest idealism. || By Katie 
Hanson 



Division Page 139 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Row one: Don Diboll (Adviser), Brian Cole, Bob Creech, Mike Graham, 
Steve Saltzman, Scott Walter, Bob Pierce, Mark Wilson (President), Matt 
Dudley, James Lowe, Steve Angelo, Kurt Knesel and Jamie Schlottman. 



Row two: David Staehling, David Lopez, Tom Anderson, Dan Dougherty, 
Jay Ritchie, Jack Perniciaro, Glen Smith, Clay Hilton, Aron Teneyck, Don 
McHenry and Trey Whitley. 




PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

(Left to right) Jennie Williams (Advisor), Jamie Gillespie, Marilyn Vertison, 
Patricia Richardson, Pam McKee, DeAnn Young, Wendy Williams, Angie 
Clepper, Janet Miller, Danelle Perez (Pres.), Cindy Gandy, and Laura Martin. 



140 Greeks 



GOVERNING BODIES 

IFC, PANHELLENIC 

AND JR . PANHELLENIC 



The Interfraternity Council serves 
as the programming, servicing and 
governing body of the member frater- 
nities on campus. It is composed of 
two collegiate members from each of 
USM's 14 fraternities. The IFC 
serves USM by developing and main- 
taining fraternity life on campus, en- 
hancing interfraternity relations, pro- 
moting superior scholarship and pro- 
viding programs and services to 
member fraternities. The council pro- 
vides its assistance in organizing such 
activities as Greek Unity Week, 
Greek Week and IFC Formal Rush, 
as it assists fraternities in the recruit- 



ment of new members. 

The Panhellenic Council is the fe- 
male counterpart of the Interfrater- 
nity Council. It is composed of a re- 
presentative from each sorority and 
serves as a governing body to the 
women involved in the Greek system 
on campus. The Council also serves as 
a host to discussions on campus events 
and issues affecting the 12 sororities 
it governs. Each delegate to the coun- 
cil is responsible for keeping her 
chapter informed of the announce- 
ments and news discussed during the 
meeting, as well as keeping her soror- 
ity current with Panhellenic issues, 



activities and campus events. 

The Junior Panhellenic Council is 
composed of one pledge from each so- 
rority and serves as a committee to 
keep pledges informed of activities 
going on around campus. It also 
serves as a means of getting pledges 
together by having them assist the 
council in candy sales for charity and 
selling pizza tickets for the United 
Way. 

The council also sponsored a talent 
show which raised $1,800 to be used 
as scholarships for sorority members. 




JR. PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

(Left to right) Beth James, Cynthia Bailey, Lee Bullard. Denise Murphy, 
Shelley Rose, Yolanda Egland, Kim Calametti, Carren Brantley (Presi- 
dent), Marilyn Vertison (Advisor) and Jennie Williams (Adviser). 



Greeks 141 




► (Right) JENNIFER 

CUNNINGHAM and BARRI 

RUSSELL show their Pi love for 

each other and "Alphie" their 

mascot. 




ALPHA DELTA PI 



L 



The Eta Zeta Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi 
was chartered at Southern on February 23, 
1985, some 133 years after their national 
founding on May 15, 1851. Members enjoy 
being involved in community activities by 
sponsoring an annual fundraiser for the Ron- 
ald McDonald House. 

The women of ADPi hold annual theme 
parties including their fall party and Christ- 
mas Blind Date. They also celebrate the spring 
with their traditional Black Diamond Ball. 



The colors of azure blue and white, "Al- 
phie" the lion, the woodland violet and the 
diamond all signify Alpha Delta Pi sister- 
hoood. Their motto, "We live for each other," 
symbolizes their involvement not only in sis- 
terhood activities, but also for the campus as 
well. 



▼ (Below) BRIDGET LINENBERGER, CAROLINE 

ARGUS and TRACY FARRIOR share in the 

sisterhood of Alpha Delta Pi. 



142 Greeks 




▲ (Above) ALISON GARDNER, YVETTE BURDON and KRIS SCHROYER 
show off their lion pride (pun intended). 

► (Right) Taking a break from studies, TRACY FARRIOR, JEANNE PITTS and 
KRIS SCFIROYER find a way to kick back and relax, or fall on their rears. 




LEANNE A INS WOK Hi 
PI RRY A I BA 
CAROLINE <\RGI S 
TRA( i Bl Af KBI RN 
MI< III I I I BREWER 

I A I RIE BRO( K 

si I I'll Wll BR! TON 

YVETTE BURDON 
ANGEI A BLR KI 

SI SAN HI KM 
STEPHANIE ( \M 

II 1)1 I H C LARK 

C ANDII < OSPJ I I'll 

I OKI ( Ol NTS 

KELLY CRAWFORD 
TIFFANY CROW 
JENNIFER CUNNINGHAM 
BETH DENHAM 
LAUREN DILL 
TRACY FARRIOR 
ANDREA FLEMING 

ALISON GARDNER 
LORI GOULD 
KRISTI GREGG 
DINA HITT 
AMANDA JOHNSON 
BARBARA JONES 
BRIDGET LINENBERGER 



CAROLE MAPLES 
JANET MEYERS 
KIMBERLY MORGAN 
DANA MORRIS 
JENNIFER PAIGE 
DEBBIE PETRO 
JEANNE PITTS 

AMY PONDER 
BONNIE POWELL 
REBECCA REYER 
BARRI RUSSELL 
KELLEY SALTLR 
SUSAN SCHOEL 
KRIS SCHROYER 

THERESA SMITH 
MICHELLE SORENSON 
BRIDGET TADLOCK 
DABNEY WEATHERFORD 
LEANNA WELCH 
AMY WHEELER 
LAURA WILLIAMS 



MICHELLE YATES 
DEANN YOUNG 
DONNA YOUNG 



Greeks 143 




ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 



Alpha Kappa Alpha was founded on Janu- 
ary 15, 1908 at Howard University in Wash- 
ington, D.C. These women of distinction, ena- 
mored by salmon pink and apple green, were 
the first black sorority to be organized, and the 
Iota Kappa Chapter became the first black 
sorority on campus on April 12, 1975. 

The women of Alpha Kappa Alpha host 
many events, including the Pink and Green 



Extravaganza, the Mr. Esquire Pageant, the 
AKA Talent Review and the Gems and Gents 
Fashion Review. The AKA's philanthropies 
include: World Food Day, Forrest General Pe- 
diatric Unit, Africare, Can-can Drive and the 
Ellisville State School. 

The chapter flower is the tea rose, and the 
ivy, the symbol of AKA, symbolizes their 
strength and endurance. 



► (Right) President of Alpha Kappa 
Alpha SHERRY ROBERSON. 

► (Far Right) Sisterhood in Alpha 

Kappa Alpha is special. These AKAs 

display it with bright smiles. 



The women of Alpha Kappa Alpha of 

1990: Row One: BRIDGET 

MILTON, NICHOLE TURNER, 

TAMMI BEW, CARMEN 

MURPHY, LISA GOODWIN. Row 

Two: ANGELA DEER, TERESA 

BURRELL, MAMIE HALL, 

JENNIFER MOORE. Row Three: 

YOLANDA EGLAND, 

FRANCELIA WILLIAMS, 

SHERRY ROBERSON. Row Four: 

ADRIENNA JOHNSON, 

MARILYN VERTISON. Row Five: 

MYRNA BATSON, MIRIAM 

BENNETT, LA-SANDRA 

ANDERSON. Row Six: KIM 

RUSHING, YOLANDA DUNBAR. 



144 Greeks 




MYRNA BA I SOX 
MIRIAM 1(1 Wl-.'I I 
I AM Ml HI W 
I I PI SA BURRI I I 
ANGELA DEER 
YOLANDA Dl INBAR 
YOLANDA EGI W\> 

LISA GOODW IN 
TONYA HAMII IO\ 
ADRIENNA IOHNSON 
JENNIFER MOORE 
( \KMI \ Ml KPHY 
M'RII PA I ["ON 
SHI RRY ROBERSON 



KIM RUSHING 
NICHOLE TURNER 
MARILYN VERTISON 
FRANCELIA WILLIAMS 




A (Above) Sisterhood and food are abundant at AKA parties. 

•^ (Left) The sisters of Alpha Kappa Alpha display their individualism. 

▼ (Below) ALTHEA STEWART and YOLANDA EGLAND are all smiles for AKA. 




Greeks 145 



ALPHA PHI ALPHA 



IN LOVING MEMORY OF 




Brother 2nd Lt. Jeffery P. Wallace, was 
born in Gulfport Memorial Hospital on May 
12, 1961 to Johnny and Phalba Wallace and 
entered the Omega Chapter May 15, 1989 at 
the age of 28. Brother Wallace was a member 
of Mu Xi Chapter and named Brother of the 
Year for the 1985-86 and 1986-87 school 
years. 

Brother Wallace was also voted chapter 
president two consecutive terms. During his 
terms of office he led Mu Xi Chapter to the 
Chapter of the Year in the State of Mississip- 
pi. While doing so. Brother Wallace was also 
accepted into the Order of Omega for Greeks 
who have above a 2.85 GPA. These accom- 
plishments were only the beginning. The next 
two years brought many more accomplish- 
ments that were well deserving of an outstand- 
ing Alpha Man. 

Brother Wallace was also a member of 
ROTC while at the University of Southern 
Mississippi and was commissioned as a 2nd 
Lieutenant through the Army's Early Com- 
mission Program. He was to assume active 
duty in August 1989 with a follow tour to 
Germany. After receiving his commission. 
Brother Wallace graduated from the universi- 
ty on May 6, 1989 with a degree in Liberal 
Arts. These are just some of the many great 
accomplishments that Brother 2nd Lt. Jeffery 
P. Wallace received. 



146 Greeks 





Deuce F. Audacious 
Maury E. Booth 
Everette Leonard Brown 
Steven Hastings 
Adonis Heavy "D" San 



Alpha Phi Alpha was founded on December 
4, 1906 at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. 
The Mu Xi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha was 
founded November 15, 1976 and was known 
as the Seven Jewel Study Club. Mu Xi Chap- 
ter received its official charter on October 23, 
1 982. This was the start of a tradition of Alpha 
Men on the campus of USM. The official col- 
ors are black and old gold. The "Men of Dis- 
tinction" of Alpha Phi Alpha have been recog- 

▼ (Below) The Alpha Phi Alphas entertain in their 
annual step show, the "Alpha Extravaganza." 






nized for outstanding community services at 
USM and Hattiesburg by supporting the 
United Way, the Ellisville State School, Jerry 
Lewis Telethon, March of Dimes, UNCF, 
NAACP and the Sickle Cell Foundation. 

The members of Mu Xi Chapter have 
served on the Interfraternity Council, Associ- 
ated Student Body, Black Pan Council, Stud- 
net Alumni Association and the Afro-Ameri- 
can Student Organization. Alpha Phi Alphas 
strive for the better making of men and high 
scholastic standards. Our motto is "First of a 
Servants of All, We Shall Transcend All." 



i«" 





O 



€9 




i (Above) The men of Alpha Phi Alpha line up for a pose. 



Greeks 147 



I 




ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 



Alpha Sigma Alpha was founded on No- 
vember 15, 1901 at Longwood College in 
Farmville, Va. The Beta Delta Chapter of 
ASA was first chartered in May 1938 at 
USM, making it the oldest sorority on campus. 

Through the support of the strong Greek 
system, Alpha Sigma Alpha recolonized its 
chapter here at Southern in November of 
1989. The women of ASA devote much of 
their time and attention to Special Olympics, 
as well as meeting the spiritual, social, intel- 
lectual and physical goals which make sister- 



hood in ASA special. The chapter holds annu- 
al social events such as Founders' Day, Christ- 
mas Party and the ASA Date Dash. The 
women also won third place this year in Delta 
Gamma's Anchor Splash. 

The colors crimson, pearl white, palm green 
and gold and the symbols of the star, clowns 
and the Phoenix are all very special to ASA 
sisters. Each member gives loyalty, love, hon- 
esty and friendship to the chapter as they up- 
hold Alpha Sigma Alpha's high ideals and al- 
ways strive to "Aspire, Seek, Attain." 



I 




A (Above) Alpha Sigs take a 

break from rollerskating at their 

Date Dash. 

► (Right) ASAs clown around on 
their Date Dash. 



- 




J$ 


I 
»^> 1 t 1 




1 m*M Mm A ^^B 

1 V/^ K Hi M 



148 (, reeks 




CAN IMC I A I I R] U 

AURA ASHI 1 Y 
MONA ( HAMBERS 
II NNII Ik ( OW \l< I 
< IIKISI INA D( N( W 
SI I Ml l RER 
RHONDA REAVES 




A (Above) Alpha Sigs have sisterhood all around. 

^ (Left) Three Alpha Sigma Alphas take time out 
from Delta Gamma's Anchor Splash. ASA captured 
third place in the women's division. 



Greeks 149 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 




Alpha Tau Omega, founded nationally at 
the close of the Civil War on September 1 1, 
1865, and at Southern Mississippi on Novem- 
ber 19, 1949, is one of USM's oldest fraterni- 
ties. Alpha Tau Omega has excelled in many 
areas including rush, intramural sports, cam- 
pus involvement and social activities. 

Some of the theme parties that ATO enjoys 
are Viking Party, Crawfish Boil, Back to the 
Beach, Grinch Party, Larkin Push Party, 
Founders' Day, Blind Date, Gator Bash and 
White Tea Rose Formal. 

The men of azure and gold have a motto 
"One man can make a difference, every man 
should try" which they follow faithfully. ATO 



has been recognized for its outstanding and 
constant community service, as the organiza- 
tion has been the recipient of the Interfrater- 
nity Council Community Awareness Award 
and was recognized for overall outstanding 
chapter by their national Fraternity as recipi- 
ent of the Alpha Tau Omega True Merit 
Award. 

Believing that their success is based on the 
remembrance that through ATO, they are 
brothers by choice and not birth, Alpha Tau 
Omega continues to stand for only the highest 
standards of scholarship, fellowship, and lead- 
ership. 



I 



I 



T (Below) Big sister CHERYL VOYNIK gives her 

little brother DAVID HONG a big hug. 

► (Right) The Alpha Tau Omegas. 




MICHAEL ANDERSON 

TODD ANDERSON 

TOM ANDERSON 

GREGG ANDREWS 

STEVE ARMSTRONG 

CHRIS BENNETT 

GREG BERAULT 

TODD BERRIER 

BRIAN BOATMAN 

TODD BOATMAN 

EDDIE BRIGGS 

BARRY BROOKS 

JASON CANONICI 

CHAD CHAMBL1SS 

SEAN CRUM 
CHAD DANIELS 
ERIC DANIELS 
JOHN DUEASE 
SHANE EVANS 
DOUG FRIDGE 

PHILIP I RYE 



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RI( HARD I RYE 
J0NA1 HAN GR V> 
KEVIN GRII I IN 
ROB! R I GROENI VII D 
( HICK HAAGA 
SHAW I HAAGA 
J. T. HALTOM 

BR1 71 HARTD1 G \N 
ANDY HAUPTMAN 
DAVID HAYES 
JONATHAN HODGE 
DAVID HONG 
MARK HOWELL 
GEORGE HIRST 

SAM JACKSON 
CHARLES JON IS 
MICHAEL KENNEDY 
TODD KNESEL 
K. K. KNIGHT 
STEVE KOMP 
DAVID KOSTMAYER 

DAVID LEBLANC 
DANA LEPRE 
STEVEN LINTON 
KEVIN MCDON \l I) 
SCOTT MCNALLY 
CASEY MCVEA 
JAY MEEKS 

DON MIDDLETON 
DONN MITCHELL 
KYLE MITCHELL 
CHIRS MOODY 
SCOTT MYATT 
DAVID PARKER 
JON PARKER 

GLENN PARTRICK 
KENT PAWLAK 
CHRIS PAZOS 
WILLIAM POLIDORE 
DONALD POPE 
LARRY RICHARDSON 
JARED ROSETTI 

DARRIN ST.AMANT 
CHRISTOPHER SMITH 
DA\ ID STAEHLING 
JOE SULLIVAN 
RICK THOMAS 
TOREY TREGANOWEN 
LOUIE VAUGHAN 



SKOTT WELDON 
JOEL WHITE 
CHUCK WILLIAMS 
TERRY WILLIAMS 
WILLIAM WYNN, JR. 
"MOM" DOT WOOD 



Greeks 151 




CHI OMEGA 



LYNNE ALEXANDER 

JESSICA ALLRED 

CHRIS BECKMAN 

SARAH BENTON 

LAURA BLAKESLEE 

BONNIE BRIDGERS 

TRICIA BUELL 

AMY BUSH 

JULIE BUSH 

KIM BYNUM 

LISA CADE 

SUSAN CADE 

LAURA CARLISLE 

ASHLEY CARTEE 

KELLI CARTEE 

GRETCHEN CHAPMAN 

MEGAN CHAPMAN 

KELLY COLLINS 

SHERRI COOPER 

STACEY COOPER 

JULIE COTTRELL 

BRENDA CURRIE 

APRILE CURRY 

CARLIN CURTIS 

DARLA DANIELS 

DIANE DAVIDSON 

SHELLEY DAUGHDRILL 

TORI DOMINGUEZ 

RACHEL DRISKELL 

DEBBY ESCHER 

VICKI EZELLE 

ALEX FLOWERS 

KATHLEEN FLOWERS 

JENNIFER GILES 

LAURA GILLIS 

ELIZABETH HEARD 

STACEY HENLEY 

MONICA HILLMAN 

CHERYL HOPKINS 

RENEE HUEY 

MISSY INGRAM 

JULIE JONES 



Chi Omega was founded on April 5, 1895 at 
the University of Arkansas and the USM 
chapter of Chi Omega National Fraternity re- 
ceived its charter on April 23, 1949. The Chi 
Omega chapter here at Southern has contin- 
ued to be a leader in all aspects of university 
life. 

The colors of the women's fraternity are 
cardinal and straw. Its symbol is the owl, its 
flower is the white carnation, the aims of Hel- 
lenic culture and Christian ideals are held dear 
to every Chi Omega's heart. 



Having a steadfast belief in helping others, 
Chi Omega sponsors its annual Songfest dur- 
ing the Christmas season, with all proceeds 
donated to a worthwhile charity. Other philan- 
thropies supported by Chi Omega are Cardiac 
Arrest (a jail-bail for the Heart Association), 
the Jerry Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Labor 
Day Telethon and Special Olympics. 

Annual parties hosted by Chi Omega in- 
clude Blind Date, Christmas Formal, Sadie 
Hawkins and Spring Formal. 



I 




152 Greeks 




KRISTY JUSSELY 
KATHERINE Kl MP 
STACEY KIRKLAND 
I EIGH KITCHENS 
KRISTIN KLUSENDORI 
AMY KNIGHT 
SISSY LANG 



ANGIE LINDSI Y 
JENNIFER LYNN 
APRIL MADDOX 
ALICIA MCDANIi I 
STACEY MCILWAIN 
PA.M MCKEE 
KRISTEN MILLER 

MOLLY MILLER 
TRACI MILLS 
MISTY MOORE 
CARISSA MORTON 
KATIE NIX 
JENNIFER PACE 
ANNETTE PARSONS 

KRISTEN PHIL1 IPS 
MARGARET PINSON 
WENDY POUNCEY 
DANE PRESTRIDGE 
TONI PRICE 
TERRI QUARLES 
CARRIE QUINTAN 

ASHLEY RICH 
KIM ROYAL 
APRIL RUNNELS 
AMANDA SCHILLING 
STACEY SCHLICTER 
SUSAN SCHWEIZER 
LISA SLAY 

PENNY SMITH 
CHARLOTTE SONNIER 
SUSAN SPEARS 
SUZANNE SPEED 
DAYNA STAGG 
TRACEY STEVENS 
JANET SUMRALL 

ROBYN SUTTON 
KAREN SZYMANSKI 
SHELLEY TAYLOR 
ALISON TIBBETT 
MARY CLAIRE TORRES 
SHELLY TRAXLER 
TANYA TULLOS 

STACIE WAITS 
ANN WALLEY 
C. C. WEAVER 
CHRISTI WEBB 
DARLA WELCH 
MERIDETH WHITE 
WENDY WICHT 



DRE WISSNER 



Greeks 153 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 




Delta Delta Delta Sorority was founded na- 
tionally at Boston University. The Phi Epsilon 
Chapter of Delta Delta Delta was chartered at 
USM in March, 1951. 

Tri Delta hosts several theme parties 
throughout the year, including Orange Crush 
Fall Party, Christmas Formal, Delta's Only 
Christmas Party, Dolphin Daze Spring Party, 
Founders' Day and Pansy Pops. The ladies of 
Delta Delta Delta have as their philanthropies 
Children's Hospital and Sleigh Bells. 

The chapter's colors are silver, gold, and 
blue. Tri Delta's Greek patriarch is Poseidon; 
pines, pearls and dolphins are all Tri Delta's 
symbols. Every Tri Delta is justly proud of her 
chapter's achievements and truly believes that 
Delta Delta Delta is "three times better." 







f 



Lll 

r 



▲ (Above) These Tri Delts show their sisterhood in 
stairwell at Panhellenic. 



the 



AMY ADAMS 

CARRIE ADEN 

PAULA ANDERSON 

TAMMY ANDERSON 

ASHLEY ARONSTEIN 

SUSAN ATKINSON 

VIRGINA BADDLEY 

NICOLE BARTHES 

ANGELA BEAN 

ANGELA BESH 

NATALIE BRELAND 

STEFANIE BRELAND 

SHEA BROOM 

AMY BROWN 

LYNNE BURMASTER 

KIM CALAMETTI 

SHERRIE CAMPBELL 

TRACEY CARVER 

SHANNON CHANCELLOR 

LAURA CLARK 

ANGIE CLEPPER 

SHERRY COLSON 

MILACEY COTTON 

KAREN CURRIE 

LISA DAVIS 

CECI DOUGLAS 

LANE EASTLAND 

ANDY EAVES 

VICI FELKER 
KEVIN FOLEY 
KIM GALLASPY 
AMY GENDUSA 
JODIE GILLESPIE 
SHERI GOLDEN 
ROBIN MORAN 




1 54 Greeks 




LORI HARRISON 
MELISSA HARM I I 
GINGER HAVARD 
TRACY HINTON 
TONYA HOLLOWAY 
ANNA HI BLR 
STEPHANIE HUNTER 

MANDY JOHNSON 
LYNDA KLNARD 
ERIN LANDRY 
CHARLENE LEBRETON 
KATHY LECKY 
SUSIE LECKY 
FAITH LIFER 

KARIN LOFTON 
KARI LUBNOW 
ROBBIE LUCAS 
SANDI LYON 
KRYSTAL MASSEY 
JEANNE MCCARTY 
SARAH MCCARTHY 

SUSAN MCCARTHY 
JULIE MCDONALD 
BECKY MCKAY 
CHRISTY MCLEMORE 
JENNIFER MILLS 
LAURA NATIONS 
LESLEY PEEBLES 

KRISTI PIKE 
STACIE PITTMAN 
KRISTA POPE 
MARTI REED 
TIFFANY REVON 
STACIE RIGGAN 
TEEJAY RILEY 

ASHLEY ROBINSON 
KELLY ROBINSON 
PATSY RUHL 
SHELLEY SANDERS 
EMILY SCOTT 
JENNIFER SCRIMPSHIRE 
PAM SIDEBOTTOM 

ERIN SMITH 

GIN SMITH 

JENNIFER SMITH 

JULIE SMITH 

KIM SMITH 

VICKI STRINGFELLOW 

CHRISTY SULLIVAN 

LISA SWILLEY 
MOLLY THOMAS 
JENNIFER TURNER 
KARA WEATHERFORD 
SHELLEY WEIDMAN 
ELIZABETH WELSH 
STACY WILLIAMS 



MARY WITHERS 
MELANTE YEATMAN 
JULIE YOUNGBLOOD 



Greeks 155 




DELTA GAMMA 



Delta Gamma was founded nationally on 
Christmas, 1873 at the Lewis School for Girls 
in Oxford, Miss. Since the Delta Pi Chapter 
was chartered at USM in 1971, the women of 
bronze, pink and blue have contributed their 
time and money to educational grants and 
loans, Alcohol Awareness, the Muscular Dys- 
trophy Association, Aid to the Blind, the Mag- 
nolia Golf Classic and blood drives, as well as 
putting on Anchor Splash to benefit sight con- 
servation. Active in collegiate organizations 
and scholastic and leadership honoraries, Dee 
Gees have received many awards for excel- 
lence. They pride themselves on achievement 
in every aspect of campus life, as a group and 
as individuals. The anchor (the Christiam 
symbol for hope) and the Raggedy Ann doll 
(known affectionately as Hannah) are the 
symbols of Delta Gamma. 

Dee Gees also have active social calendars 
with swaps, Blind Date, Christmas Party, An- 
chor Ball, Crawfish Boil, Founders' Day, 
Good-bye Girls Party and Apple Polishing 
Party. Dee Gees all share the feeling that col- 
lege is for now — Delta Gamma is forever. 



MONICA ABNEY 

PEPPER AINSWORTH 

MARY ARGUS 

LISA BALL 

LISA BAUGH 

DENINE BAYGENTS 

SHANNON BELLATTI 

BRIGETTE BURLETTE 

SUSAN CAINE 

CARLA CARTER 

CINDY CARTER 

CHRISTY CHAPPLE 

JANE CLEVELAND 

NATALIE COLLE 

APRIL COOPER 

MARY DAVENPORT 

DANIA DAVIS 

DEANNA DAVIS 

MICHELLE DEMENT 

SHANNON DUDLEY 

KAREN DUFFIE 

ERIN DUKES 

STEPHANIE EILAND 

BRITTA ELLIS 

JOANNE ELLZEY 

KIM FARMER 

ANGIE FENNELL 

MELISSA FENNELL 




A (Above) WYNDE JONES, DEBBIE STRAUB, 
LAUREN OGGS, JENNY GARDNER, HEATHER 
MCKEE, LAN MCCULLOUGH and FRANCIE 

KONIAK all welcome the new pledges on Bid Day with 
warm, friendly smiles. 



ft 




156 Greeks 







DONNA FOX 
MERCEDES GABOUREL 
JENNY GARDNER 
HEATHER GASKIN 
TINA GRAHAM 
HOI I 1 1 GREY 
JEANINE GREMILLION 

SHERR] HALL 

TERRI HA1 I 
SHERYL HANSEN 
KAMI HANSON 
LIZ HARDING 
LISA llll I 
BETH JAMES 

JENNIFER JARRFFL 
MICHELLE JEROME 
JUDY JONES 
SHELLEY JONES 
WYNDE JONES 
MICHELLE KERSTINI 
FRANCIE KONIAK 

CAROLYN LACROIX 
ANN LEAUMONT 
DEBBIE LEBLANC 
VICKIE LEE 
LAURA MARTIN 
MICHELLE MCCALL 
MELANIE MCCRORY 

LAN MCCULLOCH 
HEATHER MCKEE 
MEREDITH MITCHELL 
KRISTA MOAK 
SARA MORRIS 
LAUREN OGGS 
APRIL PAYNE 

JENNY PHIFER 
TINA PIPKINS 
BETH POT IN 
MICHELLE PRICE 
LEIGH PURKERSON 
AMY RICHARDSON 
TONYA SCHILLACI 

LAURIE SONNIER 
DEBBIE SPE1SS 
SUZANNE STANTON 
GAIL STEED 
JENNIFER STEVENS 
DEBBIE STRALB 
DEEDEE STRONG 



JILL TERRY 
CAROL THIGPEN 
MINDY THURMOND 
AMY TULLIS 
CHRISTY TYNES 
LAUREN WATKINS 
STACEY WIBRIGHT 



CECELIA WILLIAMS 
MICHELLE YBOS 
CISSY ZORTMAN 



Greeks 157 




DELTA SIGMA THETA 



Since the inception of Delta Sigma Theta in 
1913 at Howard University in Washington, 
D.C., the founders envisioned an organization 
of college women dedicated to public service, 
education and finer womanhood. Delta Sigma 
Theta is currently the largest black sorority in 
the nation. 

The Mu Nu Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta 
came to Southern's campus in July 1975 and 
was founded by 1 1 dedicated young women. 
Annual events include the Peppermint Cotil- 
lion, Gentlemens' Preview, Founders' Day 
Service and Que-Delta Weekend. The women 



of crimson and cream can be found on USM's 
campus in many organizations including 
Golden Girls, Resident Assistants, Afro- 
American Students' Organization and the 
Homecoming Court. These women also find 
time to contribute countless hours to philan- 
thropies such as United Way, nursing homes 
and the Muscular Dystrophy Association, just 
to name a few. 

The ladies of Delta Sigma Theta hold true 
to their motto, "Intelligence is the truth of 
wisdom." 




▲ (Above) The women of Delta Sigma 

Theta with their fraternity brothers, 

Omega Psi Phi, Inc., eagerly participated 

in the 1989 14th Annual Peppermint 

Cotillion. 

► (Right) The women of Delta Sigma 

Theta donate clothing to a local 

community center for unfortunate families 

as a service project. 



*? ?J* ? 



rntit 




A (Above) Soror Harriet Hawthorne is the Sophomore 
Homecoming Maid for 1989. 



1 58 Greeks 







CHANDRA BERRY 

I'll i i k i a m rry 
LORDFAS BETHLEY 
TONYA IAIRLEY 
LATOUISHA GASAWA^ 
HARRIF.T HAWTHORNH 
PAMELA HUGHES 

YOLANDA HUTCHINS 
R HO VIA JOHNSON 
ADRIANE JONES 
FREDDIE MAE JONES 
SARITA MARK 
TRACI MCCASKILL 
VIVIAN MCFARLAND 

YOLANDA MILLER 
DENISE MURPHY 
MELISSA PATRICK 
KIMSYE SLAUGHTER 
REGENIA TATE 
YOLANA WASHINGTON 
TORONAL WEBBER 

JANET WHITE 
PHATASIS WINFREY 



▲ (Above) The ladies of Delta Sigma Theta 1990 smiled beautifully as they posed in front of College Hal 



Greeks 159 



i 



Delta Tau Delta national fraternity was 
founded in 1858. The USM chapter was char- 
tered on April 13, 1986. Since that time, the 
Delts have adopted the Cystic Fibrosis Associ- 
ation as their philanthropy. They also have 
excelled academically on campus by winning 
numerous awards and appointments to honor 
societies. 




DELTA TAU DELTA 



The Delts are the men of purple, white and 
gold and are symbolized by the penguin and 
the iris flower. They remain socially active 
with their annual parties of Me Kong Delta, 
Founders' Day and the St. Valentine's Day 
Massacre. 



i 

i 



A (Above) DEL CRUM and DEREK ROBINSON celebrate winning Delta Gam- 
ma's Anchor Splash. 



160 Greeks 



A (Above) The Delts are proud in their victory at Anchorsplash. 






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IOHN ALLISTON 
WILLIAM ATKINS 
CHRIS BENNETT 
DAVID BERARD 
NOEL BLACK 
ANTHONY BLACKWELL 
JASON BLAKE 

BOBBY BL RGl 
JAY BLRNELL 
DEL CRUM 
KEITH DALE 
( HRIS I ARISH 
JAMES FOLKS 
SEAN GEORGE 

MATT GORDON 
TIM HAAS 
Bll I HOUGH 
KASEY HOWARD 
JOHN JACOBS 
ROBERT KALKA 
SCOTT LOWENBERG 

JIMMY MCGEE 
SCOTT MCNEIL 
STEVE PARTEN 
ROBERT PAYNE 
RUDY RODRIGUEZ 
GABE SHOEMAKER 
SETH STRINGER 



CRAIG THOMPSON 
GREG TOOMEY 
MIKE WELLS 



(Above) The Delts and their little sisters outside of the Delt house. 



Greeks I6l 




▼ (Below) New Delta Zetas have found their home on 
Bid Day. 

► (Right) DZs always have fun at their parties. 



DELTA ZETA 



Pink and green, turtles and the killarney 
rose can all be identified with the women of 
Delta Zeta. Delta Zeta was founded national- 
ly on October 24, 1902, and USM's Epsilon 
Mu chapter received its charter on March 31, 
1984. 

The women of the golden lamp and diamond 
have contributed countless hours to philan- 
thropies such as the Hattiesburg Recreation 
Department Haunted Forest, Gualudett Uni- 
versity for the Speech and Hearing Impaired, 
United Way, United Blood Services and Spe- 
cial Olympics. Delta Zetas are very active on 
campus as members of the Honors Student 
Association, Student Alumni Association, 
Golden Girls and numerous honoraries. 

Delta Zetas annually receive the blood drive 
award given by Greek Life. They also can 
boast many province awards, such as Out- 
standing Junior, Spirit Award and Pledge 
Scholarship award. 

Delta Zetas also find time to spend with 
their sisters. Annual parties include Tahiti 
Sweetie Blind Date Party, Christmas Skating 
Party, Spring Formal and swaps with the 
USM fraternities. 





RA< HEL ATKINSON 
HEATHER HARM II 
FENNI1 I R BARRY 
KATE BEDENBA! GH 
ASHLEY BLA1 0( K 
BARBARA BOND 
MARJORIE BOWRON 

GEORGIA BROWN 
LEE Bl I LARD 
LAURA CANADA 
SHARON CARSON 
MISSY COVINGTON 
STACEY CRAFT 
LAURA DAMAN 

KIM DAVISON 
DANNETTE FORD 
CONNI FORTE 
NATALIE FOX 
ALICIA GLOVER 
JODIE GRAHAM 
SANDRA HARWORT 

MICHELLE HELLARD 
ANDREA HOPKINS 
JUSTINE HOWE 
MONA HUDSON 
DEBORA IRWIN 
TERRI JOHNSON 
SUSAN KNOESS 

MICHELLE KORCZAK 
TISHA LANGPITT 
JULIET LOVELL 
MARY LUTTON 
MARGARET MAHADY 
MELISSA MANBY 
ELAINE MARSTON 



SUSAN MASSENGALE 
JANET MILLER 
KIMBERLY MILLS 
HELEN MONTEIRO 
LYNDA MOON 
LESLIE MUNN 
MARGARET O'BRIEN 

ANDREA PARKER 
TRACI PELLEGRINE 
MICHELLE PRICE 
RACHEL PRICE 
MELISSA SCHJEREN 
DIXIE SHEPHARD 
PAULA SHOWS 

JENNIFER SICURO 
LESLEY SIMPSON 
BARBIE SNOW 
BEVERLY STEVENS 
TONYA THOMAS 
AMY VAUGHAN 
RHONDA WALTERS 



MICHELE WANKO 
MELISSA WOOD 



Greeks 163 




KAPPA ALPHA 



Known for their southern ways, the Kappa 
Alphas are very much a part of USM. 

In the spring, the KAs are busy with the big 
brother-little brother parties, Super Bowl par- 
ty, Old South and the annual Lake Charles 
Kappa Alpha Softball Tournament. 

Perhaps the Kappa Alphas can best be de- 
scribed by their well- known slogan, "Wheat, 
barley, alfalfa: Give 'em hell Kappa Alpha!" 

KA's colors are crimson and old gold. 
Founded nationally in 1865, the philanthropy 
of Kappa Alpha is Muscular Dystrophy. The 
KA spiritual founder is Robert E. Lee. 




KAPPA ALPHA 




' 



A (Above) Kappa Alpha Order exemplifies 
the traditions of the Old South. 

A (Above right) KAs had fun with the Delta 
Zetas at their "Rock You Like a Hurricane" 

Swap. 

► (Right) Kappa Alphas party with the Chi- 
Os at their fall swap. 




164 Greeks 




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JAMES ABBO'I I III 
MARK ATTEBERRY 
WILLIAM BARKSDALE 
DAVID BURGESS 
KEVIN BYRAM 
HANK CAIN 
JOHN DOI RING 

DANIEL DOHI RIY 

DOUGLAS DONAHUE 

JONATHAN ENGLISH 

RICK FORTE 

LAWRENCE HICKS 

( LINTON III I I 

MI< HAEL HUNDSC III ID 

TONY ISENSEE 
.1 JOHNSON 
TIM LEACH 
JAMES LOCKWOOD 
PAUL LUQUET 
RONALD M. MARTIN 
CHUCK MAXIE 

HUGH MCDONALD 
ROBERT MCFLHANEY 
JEFFREY MITCHELL 
DANNY MOORE 
JOHN PARRISH 
CHRISTOPHER PIGOTT 
GARETT PRINS 

JAMES RIDGWAY 
DANNY RUSSUM JR. 
DAVID SAMMONS 
BRYAN SCHOELL 
GARY H. SEYFARTH 
HIMBERTSINOPOLI 
PATRICK SKRMETTI 



DAVID STEPHENSON 
MORRIS SWARTS 
JOHN SWIDER 
JOSEPH SWIDER 
DAVID THOMAS 
ROBERT THOMAS 
DEVIN TOMLINSON 



PAUL WALTON 
BOB WEST 
JOE WIGGINS 
KENNETH WOODS 



Greeks 165 




▼ (Below) Kappa Apha Psi officers are JAMES 
LOWER, ROLAND AUSTIN, TRACY GILES and 
VERNON GREEN. 




A (Above) IFC delegates for Kappa Alpha Psi are 
CARLTON BROCK and LEE BRIDGES. 



166 Greeks 



KAPPA ALPHA PSI 



Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. had its 
beginning in 1911 with the goal of achieve- 
ment in every field of human endeavor. The 
Kappa Iota Chapter, founded on October 10, 
1980, exemplifies this ideal by placing an em- 
phasis on academics, brotherly love, catering 
to the public needs and enriching the commu- 
nity both educationally and spiritually. The 
Kappas hold the honor of being the first black 
organization to have earned first place in 



Songfest and are known for their distinctive 
style of stepping that involves the use of canes. 

As individuals, Kappas can be found in the 
Associated Student Body, Afro-American 
Student Organization, Minority Engineering 
Technology, ROTC, Residence Hall Assocai- 
ton, Varsity Track and Varsity Football. 

The Kappas are often labelled as "NUPES" 
or "pretty boys'' and hold strongly to the belief 
that "Many are called, but few are chosen." 




JOHN BURRKLL 
GERALD CHRISTIAN 

JAMES LOWE 
CHARLES MYRICK 
HILLMAN REED 




•^ (Left) The Kappa Iota Chapter of Kappa Alpha 
Psi are proud of their organization. 

A (Above) "Throw the Yo!" 

▲ (Top) The men of Kappa Alpha Psi pose with their 
crest. 



Greeks 167 



KAPPA DELTA 




The Kappa Delta Sorority was founded na- 
tionally on October 23, 1897, and the Beta 
Sigma Chapter was installed at USM on May 
14, 1949. The women of emerald green and 
pearl white demand nothing but the bset from 
its members. 

The KDs have received the Kappa Delta 
Council Award and Merit Award, as well as 
the coveted Aubrey K. Lucas Award for Aca- 
demic Excellence. Symbolized by the teddy 
bear and the nautilus shell, Kappa Deltas sup- 
port the Children's Hospital in Richmond, 
Va., National Committee for the Prevention of 



Child Abuse and Foster Parents of America. 
Kappa Delta members can be found in cam- 
pus organizations ranging from Dixie Dar- 
lings and cheerleaders to intramural competi- 
tion and the Associated Student Body. KDs 
are kept socially active with annual parties 
such as KD Kidnap, White Rose Formal, Bear 
Hug and Beach Party. 

■4 (Left) DANNA LEARD manages to find time for 

studying and KD. 

T (Below) Kappa Deltas have fun at Bid Day 1989 




1 



ANDREA AMBROSE 

MIGNYON ANDERSON 

STACY ARNOLD 

KRISSTINA BAUCUM 

MOLLIE BAYHI 

RACHEAL BODIE 

RHONDA BOOKOUT 

MONICA BOWIE 

BARBI BROADUS 

ANDREA BROWN 

HOPE CORSO 

KAYLA COX 

TYNIA CREWS 

CHERLYN ELLIOT 

JESSICA ELLIS 

ANGELA FISHER 

HILLARY FRY 

CHRISTY GANDY 

CINDY GANDY 

KIMBERLY GILBERT 

TRICIA GORR 



168 Greeks 




MISSY (.OWIA 
KIM CRAY 
SI SAN GRIGG 
I AURA GRUNIG 
LOR] GUILLOT 
MIKI GUTHRIE 
JOEY HARRINGTON 

BETH HAWKINS 
STACEY HELLEN 
I.ARA HEYLIGER 
MELISSA HOLDER 
SHANA HUTTO 
VALARIL KING 
KATHRYN KOEPPEL 

DANNA LEARD 
BECKY LINDSEY 
SHERRY LITTLE 
JACQUELYN MAPP 
RANDI MARCHAND 
SHANNON MAXIE 
JENNIFER MCGLOTHI 



IN 



LAURIE MCMORROUGH 
KRISTIN MIDDLETON 
TELA MOODY 
JENNIFER ODOM 
MELINDA ORY 
ANGELA PAIT 
DANELLE PEREZ 

KATHRYNE PINNI.X 
KELLIE RIALS 
SANDY REID 
HEIDI RIETH 
CHARLOTTE ROBERTS 
LORI ROBERTS 
ROBYN ROBY 

SHELLEY SANSING 
MELANIE SAUTTERS 
TRACI SCHEXNAYDER 
MONICA SCRUGGS 
TORI SCULLY- 
ANN SEAGO 
STEPHANIE SEYMOUR 

AMY SHIFALO 
LISA SHORE 
ASHLEY SKELLIE 
ROBYN SMITH 
CARLA SPEIGHTS 
ELIZABETH STANLEY 
DANICA STEVENS 

TANYA STEWART 
RACHEL SUMMERSON 
KRISTAN SZMURLO 
JENNIFER TAYLOR 
NATALIE THAMES 
JENNIFER TRAYNOM 
DANA VOGT 



BRIGITTE WEBB 

Ml MRU \\ llll n\GTON 



Greeks 169 




KAPPA SIGMA 



Kappa Sigma fraternity was founded on 
December 10, 1869, and the men of scarlet, 
white and green came to USM on December 
1 1, 1948 with the intention of pursuing excel- 
lence. The Epsilon Nu Chapter strives to 
achieve this goal through campus involve- 
ment, athletics, community service and social 
activities. 

Symbolized by the star and crescent and the 
lily of the valley, the men of Kappa Sig consid- 
er helping others a significant part of fraterni- 



ty life. The Kappa Sigma men have contribut- 
ed their time to United Way, Muscular Dys- 
trophy Association and the Nick Buoni-Conti 
fund. 

The men of Kappa Sigma also find time to 
have fun at events such as football game par- 
ties with live entertainment, swaps, Founders' 
Day, Around the World in a Night Party, 
Kritter Hunt, It's Just a Party and the legend- 
ary Kappa Sigma bash, a four-day South Seas 
Island Seafood Extravaganza. 



— ^ Wm*»n( 




k- (Right) JIMMY BUFFETT, a USM and Kappa 
Sigma alum, visits the Kappa Sigs on break from his 

tour. 



ROBY ALLEN 

KEN ANDREWS 

STEVE ANGELO 

TIM BAILEY 

GREG BALSER 

CHRIS BARFIELD 

LEON BERRY 

PHILLIP BUCKNER 

STACY BYRD 

CHRIS COGSWELL 

KYLE COPELAND 

JIM CRISS 

CHUCK DAVIDSON 

MARK DEAKLE 





Pi 






170 Greeks 



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PAITON DICKSON 
JAMES DUNK AN III 
TERRY EASTERLING 
( IIRISI [AN ENGi I 
MARK FRA2IER 
WILLIAM FULTON 
II I I I URNISS 

Ml( HALL GRAHAM 
SCOTT OR LENT; 
JILL HARPER 
BLAKE HEADII Y 
BRIAN HERRINGTON 
PA I I HOLLOWAY 
JEFF HUNTER 

JAY JORDAN 
JOHN KAVANALGH 
WILLIAM KELLY 
LARRY KENNON 
WILLIAM KING 
CHRIS KOONCE 
MIKE LAROSA 

ROBERT LEARD 
JAY LEVERETTE 
DAVID LINDSEY 
FRED LITTLE 
KEN MACARO 
MIKE MADER 
JOSEPH MARDIS 

KEVIN MCKASKEY 
SCOTT MCLAIN 
MICHAEL MCNEESE 
CHASE MOSES 
MARC MOSES 
GAVIN MURRELL 
ROBERT NETHERY 

TONY PALAZZO 
STEVE PHILLIPS 
PAUL PINKERTON 
MARK POWELL 
DEREK PUCKETT 
SCOTT RUSSELL 
STEVEN SALTZMAN 

DAVID SANDIFORD 
DAVID SAULTERS 
JEFFSAULTERS 
KIRK SCHEEL 
BRENT SHAW 
BRIAN SMITH 
BRUCE SMITH 

SANDON SPEEDLING 
CLIF SPENCER 
GARY STUPICA 
SEAN SWEENEY 
MALCOLM TORRES 
MARC TULLOS 
RUSSELL VOCE 



MICHAEL WARREN 
GATES WEAVER 
BRANDON WEBB 
MIKE WHITE 
GUY WINSTEAD 
JEAN BAUGHN. (MOM) 



Greeks 171 




PHI BETA SIGMA 



The ideals of this fraternity have been cry- 
stallized in three principles: brotherhood, ser- 
vice and scholarship. Not only does Phi Beta 
Sigma believe in the brotherhood of Sigma 
men, but it also believes with equal faith in the 
brotherhood of all men. It believes in the digni- 
ty and high purpose of scholarship wherever 
possible for the common good. Finally, the 
great end of Sigma is service, service not only 
for the Fraternity, but for the general welfare 
of the society in which we live. 

In keeping wiht its motto, "Culture for ser- 
vice and service for humanity," the Phi Beta 
Sigma Fraternity carries on a three fold pro- 
gram of bigger and better business, education 
and social action. Phi Beta Sigma has affili- 



ations with organizations like the NAACP, 
National Urban League, American Cancer 
Society, National Foundation of Mrach of 
Dimes, National Panhellenic Council, Na- 
tional Alliance for Black Organizations, Con- 
gressional Black Caucus, United Negro Col- 
lege and Leadership Conference for Civil 
Rights. 

The Theta Eta Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma 
was founded on February 21, 1976. This chap- 
ter continues to exemplify the high ideals of 
brotherhood, scholarship and service; hence, it 
has been a productive asset on the University 
of Southern Mississippi's campus. The mem- 
bers of Theta Eta Chapter are proud to say, 
"Our case speeds on its way." 




▲ (Above) The men of Phi Beta Sigma exemplify the ideals of its fraternit) 



172 Greeks 



SAMUEL CLARK 
MIC HALL FRENCH 
ROBERT JOHNSON 
TONY LEE 
BOBBY MOORE 
RONALD PARKER 
JOHNNY WEATHERSBY 




A (Above) Caught before a meeting, these young men show off their more debonair 

side. 

■4 (Left) These Phi Beta Sigmas took time out from their car wash for charity to 

show off their muscles. 



Greeks 173 




PHI KAPPA TAU 



Excellence is what the Beta Epsilon Chap- 
ter of Phi Kappa Tau has come to expect and 
achieve. Chartered at USM in October of 
1948, Phi Tau was the first national fraternity 
to come to campus. The men of Harvard Red 
and Old Gold continue to demonstrate this 
excellence academically and athletically by 
finishing third in academics and by winning 
the IFC/All-University Intramural Cham- 
pionship for the last year and a half. 

Phi Taus' involvement on campus encom- 
passes such honors as Who's Who, Hall of 
Fame, Associated Student Body senators, Ju- 
dicial Board members and Southern Style 
members. Phi Taus also have held such posi- 



tions as IFC vice president, IFC intramural 
chairman, Chief Justice of the Judicial Board 
and President of the Order of Omega. 

Academically, Phi Tau has members in 
Lambda Sigma, Phi Chi Theta, Order of 
Omega and Omicron Delta Kappa. 

Athletics also are important to Phi Kappa 
Tau. Along with being IFC/All-University 
champion, Phi Tau won the IFC champion- 
ship in football, soccer, tennis and ultimate 
frisbee. 

Socially, Phi Kappa Tau is known for Red 
Carnation formal, Chipshot, Lost Weekend 
and our latest addition, Big APs Pig Party. 



CURT ALLEN 

NEIL ANDERSON 

PETER BARHONOVICH 

STEVE BARNES 

CHRIS BETHEA 

STEVEN BRADY 

MARC BRATTON 

TIM BREEDLOVE 

TODD BREEDLOVE 

TOMMY BUELL 

CHRIS BULGER 

VERNON CALDWELL 

JOHN CARNEY 

KEITH CARRICO 

CHRIS CLARK 

CHAD CURRY 

ANDREW DAVIS 

CHUCK DAVIS 

RONALD DONEGAN 

STEPHEN DYESS 

CHUCK EARNEST 

CHRISTOPHER EATON 

RON ECKERT 

GEOFF FAIRCHILD 

DANIEL FORTE 

DAMON FORTENBERRY 

GEORGE FOSTER 

JOSEPH FOSTER 

DAVID GARDECKI 

JAY GENTRY 

GRIFF GLEASON 

JON HARRIS 

MICHAEL HEWES 

CARLTON HOBGOOD 

JOHN HUBERT 




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174 Greeks 




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KRIS IOHNSON 
BUBBA JON I S 



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I IM I AFRAMBOISE 
MAI I I ARGEN 
LANC E LEFAN 
SEAN 1 INN 

CHRIS I OVELESS 
BUTC li MALLETTE 

II I I MALLETTE 
SCOTT MCCLELLAN 
GREG MCDANIEL 
PATRICK MCKINNIS 
JAY MEDLEY 

JOHN MITCHELL 
PETE MOAK 
SCOTT MULLEN 
RAY NOVAK 
DON NORRIS 
SCOTT POWELL 
JEFF ST ROMAIN 

JAMES SCHLOTTMAN 
ROB SHELTER 
SEAN SHOEMAKE 
KENNETH SINION 
WILLIAM SPENCE 
FRANK STUART 
CHARLIE SULLIVAN 

TIM TARANTO 
PAUL THEUNISSEN 
DANNY THOMPSON 
RICK THOMSEN 
JERRY TWIGGS 
STEVEN VILLARREAL 
BRYANT WALLACE 




JEFF WILKINSON 
MICHAEL ZUBER 
SALLY MATTHEWS 



Greeks 175 



PHIMU 




Phi Mu was founded on March 4, 1852 in 
Macon, Ga. The Alpha Omicron Chapter was 
established at Southern in March of 1950. 

"To lend to those less fortunate a helping 
hand" has always been a meaningful aspect of 
Phi Mu. Our national philanthropies include 
Project HOPE (Health Opportunities for Peo- 
ple Everywhere) and the Children's Miracle 
Network Telethon. On a more local level, Phi 
Mu service projects have benefited the Salva- 
tion Army and St. Jude's Memorial Hospital. 

Our chapter recently received the award for 
the Most Oustanding Chapter in the nation. 



Our flower is the rose carnation, our colors are 
rose and white, and our mascot is the lion, "Sir 
Fidel." Throughout the year we host several 
theme parties including our Fall Fling, Christ- 
mas Party, Blind Date, Beach Bash, Mother- 
Father-Daughter Banquet and Pink Carna- 
tion Ball. 

Phi Mus try always to uphold their motto 
"Our faithful sisters." 

•^ (Far left) Phi Mu sisterhood is always evident. 

T (Below) Three Phi Mus pose with their mascot, Sir 

Fidel. 



I 



WENDY BARRETT 

DENA BLAKENEY 

ALISON BOHANON 

SHERRI BOYCE 

BRANDEE BRADLEY 

FRANCES BRANDEAU 

LISA BRIGHT 

LAURA BULLOCK 

DANA CAPPS 

DANA CARTER 

KAMALA CASSIDY 

KELLI CASSIDY 

KIM CASTLE 

CHANTELL CAUGHMAN 




176 Greeks 




KIM CLARK 
CHRISTY COOK 
JANELLE CORREJOl I I s 
CATHERINE COX 
STEPHANIE CRAMPTON 
SALLY DEES 
TRACIE DOODY 

TERESAH LI.I.IOI 
SUSAN FOSTER 
BRENDA GARNER 
LAURA GRAY 
GENNY GREEN 
LESLEE GRUBBS 
ANGELA HAM 0( K 

KOI I Y HARRIS 
ERIN HARRISON 
II NNII I R HARRISON 
HEATHER 111 DGEPETH 
LARA HERRIN 
ANGIL HILL 
MICHELLE HOLDEN 

HOLLY HOOK 
CARLA HUGHES 
NOELLE KENNEDY 
KRISTI KEY 
LYNN LIGHTSEY 
LEI LORD 
ELISE LOVELACE 

AMBER LOWE 
CARLA LUKE 
DEBBIE MCINN1S 
JENNY MCMINN 
TRACEY MCPHEARSON 
MELISSA MEYER 
MANDY MONTGOMERY 

JULIE MOULDS 
MELANIE MULLEN 
MICHELLE OLIVER 
SHELLY PACE 
MARGARET PARKER 
TAMMY PARRISH 
LANA RAY POWERS 

CHRISTY PURSELL 
DAWN QUINN 
MARLA RAYNER 
LAURA REEVES 
ROBYN REY 

CANDACE RICHARDSON 
ANGIE ROBERTS 

SHELLEY ROSE 
HEIDI SLACKETT 
CLAUDIA STALCUP 
ALYSSIA STARKEY 
STACY SMITH 
DONNA TRIGG 
SUSAN VINCENT 



DINA VIVIANO 
TONYA WEINBERG 
KIM WELLS 
PATTIE WHITE 
WENDY WILLIAMS 
LESLIE WOMACK 



Greeks 177 




PI BETA PHI 



Pi Beta Phi fraternity for women was found- 
ed at Monmouth College, Monmouth, 111. on 
April 28, 1867. USM's Mississippi Alpha 
Chapter, which was installed in 1961, is one of 
the 125 Pi Phi chapters in the United States 
and Canada. 

Symbolized by wine carnations, angels, ar- 
rows and the colors wine and silver blue, Pi 
Phis are an important part of the Greek Com- 
munity. Pi Phis proudly support their own 
philanthropic projects and programs, includ- 
ing Arrowmont, Arrow Craft, the Settlement 



School, Arrow-in-the Attic and Aiming Strait. 

On campus Pi Phis show their spirit in such 
organizations as UAC, ASB, Dixie Darlings, 
Southern Misses and Southern Style. Their 
sisterhood is shared throughout the year and 
celebrated at the annual Beau and Arrow Ball, 
Shipwreck Weekend and Mystery Parties. 

"We are what we are because we chose and 
were chosen." Woven of wisdom, integrity, 
commitment and pride, a Pi Phi is many 
things, but most of all she is proud — Pi Phi 
proud. 




▲ (Above) SHANNA HOLLOWAY and 
KATRINA RODNEY show their Pi Phi love and 
sisterhood. 



CATHY LANDRUM 

HILLARY ASHCRAFT 

JENNIFER BEALL 

WENDY BEARDEN 

MONICA BEAUSOLEIL 

SHELLEY BETHEA 

TANA BOND 

CRISTINE BREERWOOD 

CAROLINE BRENKE 

KATHRYN CALVERT 

ANDREA CANON 

TORI LYNN CARTER 

NEELY CARLTON 

WENDY CLEMONS 

LINDA COBB 

CHRISTI CORONA 

BETH CULPEPPER 

MEGHAN DAUGHARTY 

CHRISTY DAVIDSON 



A (Above) LAURA FURMAN hugs her new sister 
CAROLINE BRENKE. 



A (Above) The Pi Phis on a happy Bid Day. 



178 Greeks 





MANDI DAVIS 
MARCY DEMAHY 
SUSAN DRYDhN 
COLLEEN FABACHER 
LISA FRISH 
STEFAN IE FULTON 
LAURA FURMAN 

BRIGETTE GARRINGER 
JENNIFER GARNER 
CATHY GARNETT 
NATALIE GARNETT 
SHELLI GARY 
MICHELLE GEDDIS 
KELLY GIPSON 

TAMMY GREMILLION 
JENNIFER HASSELL 
MICHELLE HEDGECOTH 
MICHELLE HILL 
TRACY HOFFMAN 
SHANNA HOLLOWAY 
LAURA INGRAM 

AMY JOHNSON 
ANGELA JOHNSON 
STEPHANIE KEITH 
SHELLY LANGLEY 
DEENA LIBERTO 
MELISSA LYON 
TAMMY MAY 

LAN MELVIN 
MELANIE MOORE 
KELLEY MURRAY 
PATRICE MURRAY 
MELISSA MUZZY 
HOPE NECAISE 
NICOLE ORFANELLO 

CHRISTY PACIERA 
HEATHER PAGE 
SUSAN PENTON 
STEPHANIE PITTMAN 
PAMELA POLLARD 
ELLEN POOLE 
ERIN RADKA 

TRACY RAHAIM 
ASHLEY REED 
PATRICIA RICHARDSON 
KATRINA RODNEY 
JENA ROLLINS 
KELLY RUSSELL 
LAURA RUSSELL 

BETHANY RUSHTON 
CHRISTY SANDERS 
SANDRA SCHILLING 
STACEY SONGE 
MESHALLE STEWART 
JENNIFER STUDEBAKER 
CHARLOTTE TODARO 

ANGIE TREST 
DAISHA WALKER 
STEPHANIE WATSON 
SHELLEY WERT 
JILL^WHITE 
PATTI WILLSON 
JULIE WOODCOCK 



Greeks 179 




PI KAPPA ALPHA 



Founded nationally on March 1, 1868, Pi 
Kappa Alpha fraternity was installed at the 
University of Southern Mississippi on Decem- 
ber 10, 1949. Members of Pi Kappa Alpha, 
commonly known as Pikes, are active in cam- 
pus activities and community service activi- 
ties. Symbolized by the lily of the valley and 
the fire truck, the men of Pi Kappa Alpha are 
strong supporters of the United Way, the El- 
lisville State School, Friends of Kamper Park 



and United Blood Services. 

The men of garnet and gold are also well 
known for their social activities. Their largest 
function is Pike Fest, a massive four day party 
held each spring. They also sponsor an annual 
Bikini Contest. 

Membership in Pi Kappa Alpha has many 
aspects, but most importantly, being a Pike 
means being a brother to all members. 








I 

■41 i< ,).- 








A (Top) Pi Kappa Alphas socialize with their little sisters. 
A (Above) Pikes celebrate Founder's Day. 



A (Top) More Pikes socializing with their little sisters. 

A (Above) A good time was had by all at Pike Founder's Day. 



180 Greeks 






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CHRISTOPHER ALLEY 
MI( HA! I BAGWELL 
DANNY BASS 
RI( HARD BEAVERS 
BRENT BROUSSARD 
KEVIN CROSIER 
ROBERT CROZIER 

HENRY DICK 
SCOTT DIXON 
DAVID DOBIE 
DAVID DORRI1 I 
RIC DUNCAN 
MARCEL DUPRE 
LEROY DL'VALL 

JAMES EDWARDS 
BENTON ELLIOTT 
JOE GAZZO 
JON GAZZO 
TODD GIBSON 
MIKE GILES 
PAT GRIFFITH 

TOMMY GRIFFITH 
HEATH HAMM 
CHAD HEBERT 
ERIK JOHNSON 
KURT KNESEL 
MARC KUBICKI 
JEFF MAGER 

ERIC MCCASLIN 
JEFF MCGILL 
KADE MOODY 
WILLIAM MORGAN 
ERIC MUENCH 
GREG MURPHY 
SCOTT OPENSHAW 

BRIAN PATTERSON 
JOHN REHAK 
JOHN REYNOLDS 
DANA SMITH 
MATTHEW SMITH 
LUKE SWANZY 
JEREMY TAYLOR 

BILL THALLEMER 
RICKY THOMPSON 
BRANT THORN 
KEVIN THORN 
CHAD VANKOOTEN 
STEVE VINCENT 
THOMAS WHITE 

REESE WIDEMIRE 
GLENN WILLIAMS 
MIKE WILLS 
MARK WILLSON 
DEANNA MILES 



Greeks 181 



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SIGMA NU 



Sigma Nu, Theta Gamma Chapter was 
chartered at the University of Southern Mis- 
sissippi on December 14, 1968. Founded on 
January 1, 1869 by three former cadets at the 
Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Va., 
Sigma Nu was intended to be a statement op- 
posing the hazing at VMI. 

The men of the white rose are involved an- 
nually in many community service projects 
supporting Muscular Dystrophy, St. Jude 
Children's Research Hospital, Red Cross and 
Adopt-a- Highway. 



The snakes, as they are commonly known, 
are bonded together by the Bible, the sword 
and the rock. They eternally strive for excel- 
lence in the fields of academics, athletics, com- 
munity and university service and brother- 
hood. Annual social events include Lorris 
Morris, Christmas Party, Spring Fertility 
Weekend and the White Rose Formal. 

Sigma Nus prize individualism, but their 
strong sense of brotherhood helps them to ex- 
cel. 



182 Greeks 




A (Top) The Sigma Nus enjoy their swap with Phi Mu. 

▲ (Above) JACK PERNICIARO, JEANINE 
GREMILLION, APRIL COOPER, MONICA 
ABNEY and DONNIE UNDERWOOD have fun 
hanging out in the ha 

► (Right) JOSEPH SOILEAU and MATT 
JOHNSON show their brotherly love. 





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JOHN ADAMS 
KEITH BLALOCK 
RICHARD B! CKMAN 
II I I Bl LTMAN 
SAMMY CARVER 
SEAN CASEY 
JAMES COMMAGERE 

TOMMY DREW 
MATT DUDLEY 
MARSHALL FAYARD 
SKIP GALLAGHER 
MARK HALDERMAN 
BLAIRE HUTCHISON 
MATT JOHNSON 

GARY JONES 
KEVIN KISER 
ERIC KOLIN 
JAMES LAWRENCE 
PAUL LIBONATO 
GARRY LOPER 
JOHN MATTHEWS 

CONRAD MILLER 
STEVE MITCHELL 
MATTHEW ORD 
THOMAS PANKO 
ROBERT PEARSON 
JACK PERNICIARO 
DARRYL PERRY 

MATTHEW PHILLION 
WESLEY PURNAM 
MATT ROSETTI 
STEPHEN RUEGGER 
BILLSCHLICHER 
RONALD SENKO 
AL SENSEMAN 



WARREN SEYMOUR 
GLENN SMITH 
TAIT SMITH 
JOSEPH SOILEAU 
GEORGE TATE 
DONNIE UNDERWOOD 
LEE VINES 



JEFF WALDEN 
JACK WOLF 



Greeks 183 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon was installed at the 
University of Southern Mississippi on Decem- 
ber 12, 1965; SAE was founded nationally on 
March 9, 1856 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

SAE contributes to the community by spon- 
soring and assisting such projects as the Char- 
ity Bowl, Easter Egg Hunt for the Child Care 
Center, Superdome Project and the Special 
Olympics. 

Social involvement within the fraternity in- 
cludes football parties, swaps, Christmas Par- 
ty, Superbowl Party, Champagne Breakfast 
and the annual spring Paddy Murphy Party. 

Symbolized by the lion and the violet, the 
men of royal purple and old gold consider 
membership to taking on the best possible life 
and call SAE a "degree in friendship." 



► (Right) An SAE with one of those "famous" lions. 



PATRICK ARBOUR 

DAVID BAKER 

JOEY BARTHES 



JEFFREY BATTLE 

ROBERT BETCHER 

ETHAN BOND 

TREVOR BOYD 

CHAD BONNER 

BLAKE BOUDREAUX 

JODY BOUDREAUX 

PAUL BRECKENRIDGE 

GREG BRETT 

TODD BUCHANAN 

MICHAEL BULLARD 

MALCOLM CARMICHAEL 

ALLAN CARTER 

DAVID CARTER 

BOB CHAIN 

PAT COOPER 

GREG CRADDOCK 

DAVID CUEVAS 

GLYN DAY 

SHANNON DEVALL 

KEN DIFATTA 



CHUCK DONLIN 

JAMES DOWNS 

JAMEY DOYLE 

JASON DUNHAM 

GEORGE FERGUSON 

BOBBY FINKE 

GENE FITTS 








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184 Greeks 








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lllH 0RB1 S 
IOHN GINN 
STACEY GREEN] 
KYLE GREER 
CLAY HILTON 
HAROLD HALE 
KIT I Y HARRINGTON 

Kl I I II HARRIS 
SI I VI HARTZOG 
JOHN HAVARD 
VINCE HAVARD 
RICHARD JOHNSON 
TYLER KHAN 
DAVID K RON LAG L 



MICHAEL LAFFERTY 
KELLY LEE 
JOSEPH LYON 
JIMMY MARLOWE 
MIKE MARTIN 
JACK MCGILL 
SAMMY MCLAl RIN 

JESSE MIGUES 
JASON MOAK 
PAUL MOSS 
PAUL NETTLES 
MICKEY NUNEZ 
MIKE NUNNERY 
CHRIS OUBRE 

CLARK PARKER 
GREG PARKER 
JAMIE PEOPLES 
JOHNNY PEOPLES 
MIKE PLITT 
JOHN RAINEY 
GUY REEDY 

RUSSELL REID 
JON RICHARD 
BILL RICHARDSON 
BILL RUSS 
CHANDLER RUSS 
MARK RUSSELL 
TODD SEAL 



JOE SHOULDERS 
JASON SIMMONS 
JOHN SIMRALL 
MARK SIMRALL 
JOHN SIMS III 
JEFFREY SISTRUNK 
RON SKRMETTA 

DON STERLING 
MCGEHEE TAYLOR III 
RANDALL TYNES 
DAVID VARDAMAN 
ANDY WALKER 
KEVIN WALKER 
SCOTT WALTER 



GREG WARREN 
SCOTTY WARREN 
WILLIAM WHITLEY III 
KRIS WILLIAMS 
WILLIAM WILSON 
JOSH WIMBERLEY 
VIRGINIA FAIRLEY 



Greeks 185 




SIGMA CHI 



Sigma Chi Fraternity was founded nation- 
ally on June 28, 1855, and the Theta Delta 
Chapter was installed at USM on November 
22, 1981. Since this time the men of the White 
Cross have been continually recognized for the 
standard of quality which they represent. The 
Sigs at Southern are one of the top chapters in 
the nation, having received the Peterson 
Award, which honors the most oustanding 
chapters in Sigma Chi, five of the last seven 
years. 

Leaders in all areas of campus life, the men 
wearing blue and old gold support such chari- 
ties as the United Way, Special Olympics, 



American Legion Clubs, the Wallace Village 
for Children and the American Diabetes Asso- 
ciation. In intramurals Sigma Chi has been a 
dominating force practically every year since 
its founding. 

Socially, the swaps, GQ Breakfast and an- 
nual Founders' Day Party, Derby Days, White 
Rose Formal, Significant Sig Banquet and 
Yacht Club Party ensure a fun and memora- 
ble college experience. Represented by the 
white rose, the men of Sigma Chi believe that 
each member is placed in a race. The rules 
require only that the race be run to the best of 
each individual's ability. 



LANCE ADAMS 

KEVIN ANDERTON 

TOMMY BAYLIS 

GARLAND BOLEWARE 

JEFF BOWMAN 

DANNY BOWERING 

JARROD BRITT 

ANDY BROADHEAD 
DAVID BUSH 
BRAD BYNUM 
KEN COOPER 
KEVIN COOPER 
TONY CREEL 
WES CRIDER 



LONN DEMOSS 

ROBERT DONNELL 

CHRIS FEROBEN 

BRADLEY FISHER 

ANDREW FOLSE 

MATT FORBISH 

MICHAEL GILES 




► (Right) Several brothers of the The- 
ta Delta Chapter visit a nationa 
founder's gravesite in Biloxi, Miss. 



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WENDELL GRIT \l 
DOUG HANCOC K 
STEPHEN HOWI I I 
KEVIN HULL 
ROD JENKINS 
REX JENKS 
BAR! JONES 

TOMMY LOWERY 
JODY MARTIN 
MORGAN MCCARTY 
ROBERT MCCREARY 
SEAN MCGEE 
RYAN MCGUFFEE 
DON MCHENRY JR. 

RUSTY MCKEE 
KENTON MCNEESE 
JIM MOAK 

shi \ \un 

FRANK PALAZZO 
JASON PARISH 
BOB PIERCE 

GREG PIERCE 
ROBERT POIRIER 
RANDY RAGGIO 
MURRAY SANDERFORD 
RUDD SCHULTZE 
CHAD SMITH 
DARRELL SMITH 

JOHN SPROLES 
BILLY STEWART 
LONNIE STINNETT 
ARON TENEYCK 
ROBERT WALKER 
SCOTT WALKER 
BRAD WEBB 

BRIAN WHITE 
KENNY PIERCE 
CHRIS LOGAN 
ERIC PETERS 
MARK HERRINGTON 
BO HUFFMAN 
MARC HAARALA 



KEVIN HOWELL 
DAMON COX 
SCOTT HALL 
KEVIN DAVIS 



Greeks 187 



i 



■Mwjks 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



I 



Founded on the cardinal principles of Vir- 
tue, Diligence and Brotherly Love, Sigma Phi 
Epsilon was established nationally on Novem- 
ber 1, 1901 at Richmond College in Rich- 
mond, Virginia. The Sig Eps, as they are com- 
monly known, were chartered at Southern on 
May 16, 1953. 

The men of purple and red take an active 
part in all areas of campus life and in commu- 
nity service. They have aided the Hattiesburg 
Humane Society, the United Way and their 
national philanthropy, the Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Camp Fund. This camp fund provides a sum- 
mer camp experience for thousands of under- 



privileged children across the nation. 

The Sig Eps, symbolized by red roses, pur- 
ple violets, and the Golden Heart, sponsor 
such annual events as Balle Masque (Mardi 
Gras Party), football game parties, Pirate Par- 
ty, and the Red Rose Formal. The men of 
Sigma Phi Epsilon believe in their mission 
statement, "Realizing Your Potential through 
the Sigma Phi Epsilon Experience ... A 
Brotherhood of Individuals." The push for 
academic excellence and the close brother- 
hood shared by Sig Eps make membership in 
Sigma Phi Epsilon "The Experience of Your 
Lifetime. " 



t 



I 




A (Above) The Sig Eps pose with their little sisters. 
188 Greeks 








GARY ADAMS 
FRANK ALQUIST 
WIJ I I AM BASS 
BRET BECTON 
SCOTT BRADL1 V 
CARL BRIT! IR 
JEFF BURNS 

THOMAS CHRISTIAN 
II I I COI.I 
MIKE COSSE 
BOB CREECH 
RAY CUEVAS 
THOMAS EVANS 
LANCE GREMILLION 

MARC I.OSII II I R 
PARISH JEW! I I 
RAY LAUGA 
DAVID LOPEZ 
BRYAN MOTT 
JEFFREY MOYLE 
RENE PAGAN 

KEVIN PARKER 
MICHAEL PHILLIPS 
RAYMOND RAMBIN 
KAV1N RHINEHART 
LANCE RUSSELL 
SCOTT SANDERS 
LYNWOOD SHANNON 



DION VECCHIO 
CHARLES VICE 
ALFRED WALCHAK 
MARC WALLING 
JASON WESBERRY 
JOHN WICHMAN 
MIKE WHITSON 



GRETCHEN DAIGLE 
JOY SAMROW 



Greeks 




TAU KAPPA EPSILON 



Since January 1 0, 1 899, Tau Kappa Epsilon 
has instilled its principal beliefs of love, char- 
ity and esteem into men across North Amer- 
ica. With more undergraduate chapters than 
any other social fraternity, Tau Kappa Epsilon 
has continued to grow in a positive way. Inno- 
vative ideals such as the Associate Member 
and the New Member Programs that elimi- 
nated the old process of "pledging," show that 
Tau Kappa Epsilon is on the cutting edge of 
the fraternity world. 

Here at USM, the Pi Psi Chapter of TKE 
was chartered on January 11, 1986. Its colors 
are cherry and grey and the official fraternity 



flower is the red carnation. The patron of the 
fraternity is the mythological god Apollo. The 
fraternity recently adopted Special Olympics 
as its new philanthropy. 

Annual parties the men of Tau Kappa Epsi- 
lon enjoy include Smith and Jones, Founders' 
Day, Christmas Party and Shaka Haole. 
While providing a great social atmosphere, 
Tau Kappa Epsilon also stresses academics 
and provides leadership skills essential to help 
its members attain their goals. Being a mem- 
ber of Tau Kappa Epsilon offers a man the 
oportunity to be a part of a tradition of excel- 
lence. 




A (Above) The Tau Kappa Epsilons and friends pose for a quick shot. 



190 Greeks 







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A (Above) The Tekes have fun socializing with their little sisters. 
•*<»i M (Left) The Tekes enjoy a little celebration with friends and refreshments 



Greeks 191 




ZETA PHI BETA 



Zeta Phi Beta Sorority was founded on 
USMs campus in April of 1982. With blue 
and white for its official colors and the white 
rose as its flower, the national chapter of Zeta 
Phi Beta was founded on January 16, 1920. 

The women of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. 
participate in many community activities and 
service organizations such as the Thurgood 



Marshall Educational Foundation, the United 
Way, the NAACP and the Salvation Army. 
The Zetas also volunteer at the Special Olym- 
pics Ceremonies held in Hattiesburg. The 
women of Zeta Phi Beta maintain an active 
social calendar with theme parties including 
Little Miss Zeta and the Blue and White 
Weekend Bash. 



■ 




A (Above) Two Zetas show their sisterhood 

► (Top Right) The Zeta Phi Betas wash cars for charity 

► (Right) Zetas help out at the Special Olympics 



192 Greeks 






CYNTHIA BAI1.I Y 
JOAN MCGREW 

VKRNA SMITH 



A (Above) The Zetas display the coloring books which they distributed to 
children at Forrest General Hospital. 



(Above) The Zeta Phi Betas and Phi Beta Sigmas throw a party. 

(Top) Zeta Phi Betas volunteer for the Special Olympics in Hattiesburg. 



Greeks 193 



GAMMA ALPHA EPSILON 



The Gamma Alpha Epsilon Honor Soci- 
ety recognizes Greek students who have at- 
tained scholastic prominence at the Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi, ranking in the 
top three percent of all Greeks within their 
respective college. GAE inducted new 
members and officers at its Eighth Annual 
Academic Awards Banquet, as well as rec- 
ognized Greek excellence in scholarship. 
GAE hosted Mike Moore, Attorney Gener- 
al of the State of Mississippi, who spoke of 
the bright future of USM and Mississippi 
and the role of each student in achieving 
widespread eminence for the university and 
state. 

▼ (Below) The sophomores with the highest grade 
point average at GAE's Awards Banquet are CARO- 
LYN LACROIX and STEPHEN HOWELL. 



Individual awards for highest grade point 
average within each class were presented to 
sophomores Carolyn LaCroix, Delta Gamma, 
and Stephen Howell, Sigma Chi; juniors Amy 
Richardson, Delta Gamma, and Randy Rag- 
gio, Sigma Chi; and seniors Kay Koeppel, 
Kappa Delta, and Billy Stewart, Sigma Chi. 
Junior Panhellenic Scholarships were award- 
ed to Lesley Alice Simpson, Rhoma Johnson, 
Laura Furman and Angela Trest. Sheri Gold- 
en, Delta Delta Delta, and Lauren Watkins, 
Delta Gamma, were awarded the prestigious 
Ivan O. Wilber Scholarships. 

Martha Montague, the new Greek Life Di- 
rector, presented the Chapter Scholarship 



▼ (Below) RANDY RAGGIO is the junior fraternity ▼ (Below) KAY KOEPPEL is the senior sorority mem- 
member with the highest grade point average. ber with the highest grade point average. 



Wards to Delta Delta Delta Sorority for high- 
est pledge and active grade point average and 
to Delta Tau Delta Fraternity for highest ac- 
tive overall grade point average. The Most Im- 
proved Scholarship Awards were presented to 
Delta Delta Delta Sorority and to Phi Kappa 
Tau Fraternity. 

Dr. Peter Durkee presented the Aubrey K. 
Lucas Awards, recognizing Delta Delta Delta 
Sorority and Delta Tau Delta Fraternity for 
scholastic excellence. ■ By Katie Hanson and 
Ann Leaumont 






▲ (Above) DR. PETER DURKEE presents the Aubrey K. Lucas Awards for Scholarship to Delta Tau Delta 
representative CRAIG THOMPSON and Delta Delta Delta representative JODIE GILLESPIE. 

► (Right) The Ivah O. Wilber Scholarship recipients are 
SHERI GOLDEN and LAUREN WATKINS. 

194 Greeks 





Il (Above) Delta Tau Delta representative CRAIG 
"HOMPSON receives the Fraternity Active Scholarship 
Vward. 




l i (Above) DR. PETER DURKEE presents Delta Delta 
elta representative JODIE GILLESPIE with the Active 
id Pledge Scholarship Awards. 




i (Above) The Junior Panhellenic Scholarship recipients 
•e LESLEY ALICE SIMPSON, LAURA FURMAN 
id RHOMA JOHNSON. 



ORDER OF OMEGA 



Founded on April 1 4, 1 959, at the Universi- 
ty of Miami, the Order of Omega was estab- 
lished to recognize Greeks for distinguished 
leadership in inter-greek and campus activi- 
ties, to encourage continued growth of inter- 
fraternal activity and to inspire others to strive 
for similar relations. The Beta Chapter at the 
University of Southern Mississippi was the 
second chapter, established on February 9, 
1967, to join in bringing together outstanding 
fraternity men and women to create this orga- 
nization, which would help to enhance inter- 
collegiate fraternity affairs. 




▼ (Below) The 1990 officers of the Order of Omega 
at USM are JAMES SCHLOTTMAN, president; 
MARC WILLSON, vice president; KATHY 
LECKY, treasurer; and SHANNON TULLOS, 

secretary. 




Greeks 195 



GREEK WEEK 1990 



OUTSTANDING GREEKS 




UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 



Sponsored by the Interfraternity Council 
and the Panhellenic Council, the Greek Week 
Committee recognized outstanding greeks and 
new Order of Omega members at its annual 
Greek Week Awards Banquet. Danelle Perez, 
the outgoing president of Panhellenic Council 
presented the Panhellenic certificates and 
awards. Delta Gamma received the Sports- 
manship Award, Kappa Delta received the 
Community Service Award, and Alpha Delta 
Pi received the Alcohol Awareness Award. 

Bob Pierce, outgoing IFC president, pre- 
sented the Interfraternity council certificates 
and awards. Jack McGill, Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon, was awarded Intramural Athlete of the 
Year, and Dallas Dale, Pi Kappa Alpha, was 
awarded the Varsity Athlete of the Year. Indi- 
vidual Intramural winners were Sigma Chi, 
bowling and basketball; Kappa Sigma, volley- 
ball and half-court baksetball; Pi Kappa Al- 
pha, racquetball and football; Sigma Nu, golf; 
and Phi Kappa Tau, tennis, Ultimate Frisbee, 
weight- lifting, and soccer. Alpha Tau Omega 
received the Community Service Award and 
Most Improved Chapter. Delta Tau Delta re- 
ceived the Alcohol Awareness Award. The 
Citizenship Award was presented to Colonel 
Garland Boleware. Dr. Joe Paul, Dean of Stu- 
dent Affairs, presented the Outstanding 
Greek Awards. Greg Berault, Alpha Tau 
Omega, and Carolyn LaCroix, Delta Gamma, 
were the Outstanding Greek Pledges. Bob 
Pierce, Sigma Chi, and Michelle Jerome, Del- 
ta Gamma, were the Outstanding Greek Ac- 
tives. 



► ( Right) MICHELLE KERSTINE donates a pint of life in 
the Delta Gamma chapter room as RUSSELL VOCE and 
MINDY THURMOND sympathize. Delta Gamma won the 
Blood Services Donor Award, with 121 pints donated. 










196 Greeks 



;, 




-4 (Left) MARTHA MONTAGUE, Greek Life 
Director, delivers a speech at the Greek Week 
Banquet. 






I *S <"•» 






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■■" ^ii" — 

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A (Above) JOE PAUL congratulates 
BOB PIERCE and MICHELE 
JEROME, recipients of the 
Outstanding Greek Active awards. 

•^ (Left) The champions of tennis. 
Ultimate Frisbee, weight- lifting, and 
soccer — the Phi Kappa Taus. 



** 







Ml 5- 




Greeks 197 



GREEK WEEK 1990 



Guys in dresses, fraternity pins, "letter" jer- 
seys, gods and goddesses in sheets . . . 

Greek week opened on the Tuesday after 
Easter Break, inspiring Greek unity and com- 
petition with the First Annual Mr. Southern 
Pageant. Donning evening gowns and per- 
forming unforeseen talents, the fraternity men 
did their best to emulate the female partici- 
pants that they were modeled after. The Greek 
Week team provided a female escort (dressed 
in gentlemen's attire, of course) for each of the 
contestants. After an evening of uncontrolla- 
ble giggles and outright laughs, the judges 



chose Tom White of Pi Kappa Alpha as the 
first Mr. Southern. 

The Greek Week Awards Banquet was held 
Wednesday night, honoring Greeks for out- 
standing service, as well as brotherhood and 
sisterhood. 

Greeks continued promoting Greek life on 
Pin Day Thursday. All fraternity and sorority 
members donned their badges and faced the 
Southern Mississippi heat in their coats and 
ties and dresses and hose. Friday was Jersey 
Day and Greeks showed their letters and col- 
ors everywhere on campus. The annual Greek 



Week Race was held in the afternoon with the 
presentation of gods and goddesses. 

Because of Panhellenic High School Week- 
end, the Greek Games were scheduled for 
Sunday afternoon. The beautiful weather, un- 
fortunately, lasted just long enough to build up 
the anticipation for the games. Rain washed 
away the hopes of a fun- filled afternoon on the 
intramural fields. 



► (Right) This contestant in the Mr. Southern pageant 
picks his question from Greek Week Chairman, SHEL- 
LEY WERT. 









► (Right) These Pi Beta Phi's try to control their laughter at the 
pageant. 

► (Right) Tri Deltas KRYSTAL MASSEY, MOLLY THOM- 
AS and ELIZABETH WELSH participated in Greek Week by 

wearing jerseys on Friday. 



Greeks 




GREEK WEEK 1990 

SCHEDULE OF 

ACTIVITIES 



TUESDAY 

Mr. Southern Pageant 

WEDNESDAY 
Greek Week Awards Banquet 

THURSDAY 
Pin and Grin Day 

FRIDAY 

Jersey Day 

Presentation of Greek 

Gods and Goddesses 

Greek Week Race 

SUNDAY 

Games! 




A (Above) KRISTA POPE sang with the contestants at the pageant. 



Greeks 199 



GREEK 
GAMES 

The week was over, the greeks were unit- 
ed, the games were just hours away . . . siz- 
zle, crack, BOOM! The rain fell, and greeks 
scattered. The games were doomed. 

On Sunday afternoon, the final day of 
Greek Week 1990, the big finale — Greek 
Games — were to take place on the intra- 
mural field behind the stadium. Gloomy 
weather was threatening the day's fun, but 
enthusiastic greeks ran around anyway pre- 
paring for an afternoon of fun competition. 
Lots of Greeks were stationed on the field 
hours before the opening ceremony, armed 
with the umbrellas that would soon become 
a necessity. As two o'clock drew near, the 
clouds burst into a torrent of wind and rain, 
soaking the field as well as all the greeks 
who were outdoors. The quicker ones hur- 
ried to the Sports Arena before becoming 
completely soaked. 

In the closely packed half of the Arena 
where the contestants gathered, it was an- 
nounced that the games would be post- 
poned for an hour providing that the rain 
stopped. But later that afternoon, amid 
shrugs of disappointment and sighs of re- 
lief, the Greek Week Chairmen announced 
that the games had been cancelled. 

Many greeks made the most of their free 
afternoon, stuck inside because of the rain. 
Some were more disappointed than others, 
however, as some Sigma Alpha Epsilons 
complained, "But we wanted to go play in 
the mud!" 



200 Greeks 




GREEK UNITY 



■^ (Left) This student worked hard for her organization 
during homecoming. 

▼ (Below left) These Phi Mus always have time for a 
study break. 

T (Below) PENNY SMITH and TONI PRICE show 
their Chi Omega spirit at Songfest. 



Being a member of a Greek organization at 
the University of Southern Mississippi means 
more than wearing funny looking letters and 
going to parties. It means staying up until all 
hours of the night to work on a homecoming 
float to display pride in our university. It 
means practicing for and participating in phil- 
anthropic projects to benefit the needy. It 
means studying (and taking study breaks) to 




show that you didn't just come to school to 
party — you came to learn. It means that 
there will always be a shoulder to cry on, a 
hand to hold and an ear to listen and a 
group to support you when you need it. It 
also means that no matter what happens, 
together, you can make ANYTHING fun 
- from building runways for beauty pag- 
eants to cleaning Highway 49. There is a 
feeling of satisfaction after giving your all 
to a project, and then there are the parties. 
USM Greeks — Black, Gold and YOU! 



T (Below) DAVID LEBLANC and DAVID 

HONG are caught in the act of unloading wood for 
the Miss Hattiesburg runway. 

•4 (Below left) KAREN DUFFIE tried hard to drop 
an egg in the cup at Sigma Chi's Derby Days. 



£$&. 




Organizations' Contents 


PAGE(S) 


ORGANIZATION 1 


204 


Afro-American Student Organization 


205 


Alpha of Mississippi j 


206 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


207 


American Chemical Society ; 


207 


American Institute of Building Design • 


208-09 


Associated Student Body 


I 210 


American Marketing Association !.; 
American Society of Interior Design 


210 


211 


Baptist Student Union |jj 


212 


Business Student Council 


212 


Criminal Justice Association 


213 


Delta Sigma Pi | 


214-215 


Eagle Connection j ; 


216 


Fashion Plus 1 1 


216 


George Hurst Education Society | 


217 


Gamma Beta Phi | 


218 


Gold Tenders 1 


218 


Golden Girls a 


219 


Golden Key 1 ■ 


219 


Homebuilders Association 


220 


Honor Student Association 


220 


International Relations U 


221 


Kappa Mu Epsilon |# 


221 


LSD Choir | 


222 


Lambda Sigma Society 3 


223 


Minority Engineering and Technologists 1 


223 


Paralegal Association | 


224 


Omicron Delta Kappa 3 


225 


Phi Beta Lambda | 


226 


PhiChiTheta 


227 


Phi Delta Rho | 


228 


Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 


228 


PRSSA I 


229 


Recreation Majors 3 


229 


Rho Epsilon 1 


230-31 


Resident Halls Association \< 


232 


Hickman Hall | 


233 


Hattiesburg Hall .-; 


233 


Hillcrest Hall Council 


234-239 


ROTC 1 


234-35 


Air Force 


236-39 


Army 


240-41 


Student Alumni Association 1 


242 


Rotoract 


242 


Social Work Club 


! 243 


Society for the Advancement of Management i 


244 


Southern Style 


245 


Speech Communication Association !.: 


245 


Student Printz 


246 


Student Dietetic Association 


246 


Student Home Economics Association S 


247 


Student Nurses Association 1 1 


248-50 


University Activities Council \\ 


252-53 


USM Bands 1 


251 


Wesley Foundation H 





00 



u* 



\ * 1 



A (Above Right) Delta Sigma Pi's 
STEVEN BROWN definitely clowns 
around at the organization's Halloween 
Party. 

► (Right) Two Wesley Foundation mem- 
bers provide food and fellowship at a cook- 
out. 






9 



f 



202 Division Page 



▼ (Below) UACs ALLISON SCHUH 

tries to hang a sign to promote the HooDoo 
Gurus concert. 



l~ -j^jyfc ii H- f- ■ i \.±~ 




Worth Our 
Weight In GOLD 




Organizations 



The one thing USM definitely does 
not lack is student organizations. 
There are more than 200 campus or- 
ganizations — organizations which 
just about anyone can join. Whether 
social, academic, recreational or in 
support of a cause or a shared interest 
or talent, these organizations benefit 
the school as well as the student. 
From dances to community projects, 
each organization offers its members 
a variety of activities; thus, each orga- 
nization may help a student prosper 
in a unique way. However, none of 
these vast numbers of campus organi- 
zations would exist if the largest and 
the most popular organization did not 
exist — the USM Student Organiza- 
tion. Whether they wanted to be or 
not, students are a member of this 
uncanny organization. There is no 
president of this club; therefore, each 
student is represented equally and 
plays a major role in this club. With- 
out this organization and the organi- 
zations it has spawned, USM may not 
be "Worth Its Weight in GOLD!" 



Division Page 203 




(Front row) RIVA BROWN, 
GERALD CHRISTIAN, 
DAPHNE HULL, ANGELICA 
WILLIS, PHOEBE GORDON, 
MARCUS CATHEY, COREY 
BARNES, ISAAC BISHOP, 
STACY STOWERS, SA- 
TONYA HOBSON.SAID MU- 
HAMMAD, HILLMAN 
REED. (Back row) BERNA- 
DINE JOHNSON, RODNEY 
HARRIS, TOYA PHELPS, 
LISA Q. WILLIAMS, DER- 
RELL BRITTON, NAOMI 
DOBSON, DOMINICA 
RHODES, MICHAEL SNOW- 
DEN, DEANNE HAYNES, 
JAMES B. LOWE, DERRICK 
BANKS. (Not Pictured): 
MARILYN BLAND, VIENNA 
BROWN, CHRIS BURKS, 
TINA BURNETT, SAMMY 
CLARK, TOPEKA CLAY- 
TON, REGINALD ELDER, 
LARRY FLOWERS, DARYL 
HARRIS, HARRIETT HAW- 
THORNE, JENNIFER LEE, 
KEITH MAGEE, ZEPTON 
MARTIN, LOUIS MCLEN- 
DON, FELICE MURPHY, NI- 
LEEN NICHOLSON, MELIS- 
SA PATRICK, AUBREY 
SMITH, TONY THOMPSON, 
KECIA THORNE, KENNETH 
WHITE, FRANCELIA WIL- 
LIAMS, JOYCE PITTMAN, 
FRANKLIN RHEA, MONA 
ROSS, VERONICA SHOW- 
ERS, ROSALYN MURRAY, 
JENNIFER LEE, GARY 
MCGEE. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATION 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDE 





rxJLJrflriL v/X^ lVJLxii3i^Xi^ik3JLJc Jl A 







ABOVE Row One: SHARON QUIGLY, SHELTON VANCE, MICHAEL BURNS, 
PATRICIA TUCK, PETER HESKETH, JOCELYN RACKLEY, TEISHA SCHEX- 
NAYDER, HILDA HAM, JAMES LAMBERT, LYNDA HOOD, BETH HAWKINS, 
ELISE BERRY Row Two: ANGIE GRAYSON, CHIP HOLBROOK, MARSHA STO- 
VALL, DANIEL REILING, LESA HAMMOND, JANICE GREEN, DIANNE COX- 
WELL, TAMMY AHREND, GARRETT BROWN, JOEL BYRD Row Three: DARLA 
DANIELS, KELLY SMITH, JEAN BOUTWELL, JERROLYN MARTIN. JODY MAR- 
TIN, CECILIA BLAKENEY Row Four: BELINDA FOSHER, MISSY WHITMERE, 
OLGA MORALES, TINA PIPKINS, CHRISTA STAPLES, STACY JACKSON, JOEL 
HAMMOND, DALE COKER, KIM MILLS, TROY FRISBIE, THOMAS LOWERY, 
ETHAN MCCARTHY, PAULA MILLER Row Five: DIANE HARTZLER, TIFFANY 
BARLOW, KELLY STEVENSON, KIM OWENS, CONNIE STEWART, LYNN 
WHITTINGTON, MICHAEL OSBINE, JASON GUNNELL Sixth Row: TWYLLA 
JOYNER, CORNELIUS MAYFIELD, LAURIE SONN1ER, LOUIS MCLENDON, 
BRAD FITZGERALD, MARK PRUITT. 



CHIP HOLLBROOK 
PRESIDENT 



Alpha of Mississippi is an alumni associ- 
ation for the students who were members of 
Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society at their com- 
munity/junior college. This organization pro- 
motes leadership, service, scholarship and 
friendship among its members. Alpha helps 
these transfer students in their transition to 
USM by providing an organized group to bond 
with. 



Organizations 205 




ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 




Alpha Lambda Delta is 
a national society that 
honors academic excel- 
lence during a student's 
first year in college. Its 
purpose is to encourage 
superior academic 
achievement among stu- 
dents in their first year in 
institutions of higher edu- 
cation, to promote intelli- 
gent living and a contin- 
ued high standard of 
learning and to assist 
women and men in recog- 
nizing and developing 
meaningful goals for their 
roles in society. 



ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA ALPHA LAMBDA DELT W 





MEMBERS 




KELLY LEANNE ARCARESE 


JOY NOEL HOSEY 


MARY DEAN POITEVENT 


HILLARY BETH ASHCRAFT 


SHARON KAYE HOWELL 


MICHELLE ANN PRICE 


BARRY IRVING BARKER 1 


STEPHEN SCOTT HOWELL 


JOSEPH RAYMOND RAMBIN, III 


KRISSTINA JAN BAUCUM 


BRIAN LEE HRABOVSKY 


LAURA ANN REEVES 


MARY REBECCA BIVINGS 


LISA NICHELLE JAMES 


DEBORAH JOAN RISK 


STACY ELIZABETH BREAZEALE 


TONYA RENE JOHNSON 


KELLY ANN ROBINSON 


LAURA KAY BULLOCK 


ERIC WAYNE JORDAN 


LINDA JANE RONE 


JULIE KAY BUSH 


ALICE JOSEPH 


PAMELA DEAN SAN FORD 


! MELANIE LYNN CANNON 


ROBERT WILLIAM KALKA 


REBECCA ANNE SHIRLEY 


AMANDA FAITH CUPIT 


SHANNON STAGG KENNARD 


PENNY LEANNE SMITH 


JAMES LEMORE DANIELS 


DAVID PAUL KRONLAGE 


YVETTE SUZANNE SOULIE 


1 MARY KATHRYN DAVENPORT 


KERMIT SHANNON KWAN 


VALERIE DENISE STAPLETON 


JOHN KENDALL DIFATTA 


CAROLYN ESTHER LACROIX 


DANICA LEE STEVENS 


TIFFANY ANN DOWNS 


BRENT STEPHEN LAJAUNIE 


DONNA CLAYRE STEWART 


WANDA BURKHALTER EVANS 


DANA CARISE LEARD 


LISA SURILAK ST.LOUIS 


CYNTHIA GAYLE FARMER 


TODD MICHAEL MARCIANI 


SUSAN ELIZABETH STOUGH 


JENNIFER FLOWERS 


ANDREA GAYLE MATHEWS 


BRUCE ODELL SULLIVAN 


LISA ANN FRISH 


LYNN MARIE MCDOWN 


CHRISTY LEANN SYLVEST 


BRENDA LEE GARNER 


LAURA KATHRYN MCGAVOCK 


CHARLES JEREMY TAYLOR 


NATALIE MAE GARNETT 


HEATHER MAUREEN MCKEE 


JAMIE LEIGH TAYLOR 


HOLLIE MARIE GREY 


MICKI LYNN NODURFT 


ROBERT KEVIN WALTERS 


RACHEL LAUREN HAYS 


SCOTT EDWARD NORTON 


STACEY LEIGH WERTZ 


JASON IAN HEWITT 


KENNETH NOEL ODOM 


ANGELA CAROLE WILKIE 


CAROL ANNETTE HIGH 


GINGER JO PENDARVIS 




206 Organizations 







AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 




AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY/AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BUILDING DESIGN AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY/ 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE 
OF BUILDING DESIGN 




PAUL WHITE, CHERIE SHOWS, LOUISE SISK, ISAAC BISHOP, GINA BUCKLEY, DOUG DYESS YSI- 
DRO SALINAS. 




PAUL WHITE 
PRFSIDFXT 



The student chapter of the 
American Institute of Building 
Designers, an organization 
open to all architectural engi- 
neering majors, helps prepare 
students for careers in the 
building design industry. AIBD 
activities facilitate an under- 
standing of the profession that 
student members seek. Institute 
activities include field trips that 
accent building design and fund 
raisers that strengthen the In- 
stitute. 



Organizations 207 



ASS 1 








JON RICHARD 
PRESIDENT 



ii.tjh!!MeJl^T» Jr mLm}* O^jl J^JL^lJ^wA^^HOwOr ' v^ AJ51IN rL 



The Associated Student Body (ASB) is a 
student organization that sponsors a variety 
of activities and programs on campus. Also, 
the ASB provides a number of services to 
the students. Included among these services 
are check cashing, short-term loans, refrig- 
erator rentals, student medical insurance, 
free legal counseling and publications such 
as the Student Handbook. The members of 
ASB represent the students' voice to the 
faculty and administration as well as local 
and state officials. 




Row One: Officers. ANGELA BEAN — Election 
Commissioner, SALLY DEES -■ Vice-President. 
Row Two: DONN MITCHELL — Treasurer, JON 
RICHARD — President, BILLSCHLICHER — At- 
torney General. 




Row One: Sally Dees, Jon Richard, Angela Bean, Clay Hilton, Wynde Jones, Michelle Jerome, Lori 
Lowe. Row Two: Kim Evans, Melanie Yeatman, Doug Massey, Nissa Ford, Linda Norman, Fran Jones. 
Row Three: Heather McKee, Robert Harenski, Bill Schlicher, Tammy Gremilion, Billy Stewart, Donn 
Mitchell. 



ASSOCIATED STUDENT BODY SENATE 




▲ (Above) Row One: DEBORAH HEWITT. 
TERRY EDWARDS, TONY PALAZZO. 
TERRY EASTERLING. BETHANY 
RUSHTON. LEANNE AINSWORTH. ED- 
DIE VOYNIK. TOMEKA CLARK. SALLY 
DEES. Row Two: BRAD SMITH. TOM AN- 
DERSON. NATALIE BRELAND. LINDA 
BROGAN, LAURIE SONNTER. SELENA 
COOK. TRACEY PELLETIER. MARC 
BRATTON. JAMES FENTON. KIM 
JOHNSON. Row Three: MARK RUSSELL. 
KAYLA COX. DAVID KOSTMAYER. 
BETH POTIN. MEG MA/I ARZ. TRUDY 
CALHOUN. SHANNON TULLOS. GREG 
SANCHEZ. LAURA GI1.LIS. JOE MAR- 
SHALL, BECKY MCKAY. CARRII 
ADEN. 



SENATE OFFICERS 



-4 (Left) DEBORAH HEWIT - Adviser. 
MEG MAZIARZ — Parliamentarian. LIN- 
DA BROGAN — Secretary, SALLY DEES 

- ASB Vice-President. TOM ANDERSON 

- President. 



Organizations 209 



AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOC . 




CHRIS WISE 
PRESIDENT 



The USM Collegiate Chapter of 
the American Marketing Associ- 
ation was established so that uni- 
versity students could organize 
themselves for mutual benefit. 
Among its purposes are to foster 
scientific study and research in the 
field of marketing theory and an 
exact knowledge and definition of 
marketing research, and to con- 
tribute to the improvement of the 
teaching of marketing. 





Row One: DOLLY LOYD, CHRIS WISE, KATHRYN BOH, ELIZABETH NELSON, DENISE RUSH, JETT 
DORSETT, BRIAN KAZZMAREK, WILLIAM SCHOEL. Row Two: JANIS FRANKS, RUDY RODRI- 
GUEZ, JOSEPH CURTISS. Row Three: HENRY WARD, JAMIE CASTILLO, DANIEL WIGGINS. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF 
INTERIOR DESIGN 



The American Society of 
Interior Designers was 
founded with the firm con- 
viction that the common 
good of all designers can best 
be served by one voice speak- 
ing for the profession. 



Row One: MICHELLE WOODALL 
AND MIKE STAFFORD — PRESI- 
DENT, PAM COWSEY, SUSIE 
HOLLINGSOWRTH, MARY EL- 
LEN HAMILTON, SUZANNE 
STANTON. Row Two: KELLI CAR- 
TEE, MRS. EAST, MRS. WATSON, 
SONJA WALTERS, KAY SPEN- 
CER, APRIL GUESS, ANN RICKS, 
ALICE JOSEPH, VICKI FELKER, 
MARY POO, KELLY WEEMS, 
PAM PETRO, JOAN TRAYLOR. 
Row Three: JOHN GILLUM, 
KEYLA HAMILTON, ALYCE LU- 
CIUS, KATHY COLSON, CAROL 
GODBOLD, PAM GILL, MIRIAM 
LOGAN, TOMMY DELCAMBRE. 

Jib Organizations m ^"^^^""" 




I 



r~ 




APTIST STUDENT UNION 



BUSINESS STUDENT 
ADVISORY COUNCIL 




The Business Student Ad- 
visory Council is an organi- 
zation of business students, 
appointed by the faculty of 
each academic area in the 
College of Business Admin- 
istration and including a re- 
presentative of each of the 
business fraternities. The 
council provides a medium 
through which student opin- 
ions may be heard and a fo- 
rum for the consideration of 
business fraternity prob- 
lems. 



BUSINESS STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL/CRIMINAL JUSTICE ASSOCIATION BUSINESS STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCII DE 




CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
ASSOCIATION 



SCOTT WOMACK 
PRESIDENT 



The Criminal Justice As- 
sociation is an organization 
for students majoring or 
minoring in Criminal Jus- 
tice. The driving force for 
this association is that it pro- 
vides students interested in 
the Criminal Justice field a 
view of the field by affording 
opportunities for students to 
interact with practioners. 



Organizations 




Row One: Donald Norris, Jennifer Johnson, Scott Womack, Kelley Smith, Mary Brumfield, Ferris Byxbe, Brad Lea 
Row Two: Wesley Layton, Janet Grubbs, Annie Sturdivant, Carolyn Butler, Mark Maddox, Shelby Smith, Joe 
Wise, Wendy Lennep Row Three: Joey Womack, Rick Hoerner, Bobby Courtney, Mike Lee, Tom Wilson, Allen 
Yancey, Mark Lang Row Four: Johnny Newsome, Everette Brown, Markal Fowler 




Delta Sigma Pi 




Delta Sigma Pi is an in- 
ternational business fra- 
ternity whose member- 
ship is limited to business 
majors. This chaper was 
founded on the USM 
campus in 1950 by Joseph 
A. Green, dean of the Col- 
lege of Business Adminis- 
tration. Some of this 
group's activities include 
lectures, tours, fund- 
raisers, and community 
service projects. 



A (Upper Left): KELLY PONDER, KAREN PREWETT, and KAREN 
SPEIGHTS definitely "hop around" at Delta Sigma Pi's Halloween party. 

▲ (Above) Little Red Riding Hood, JANIE MADDOX, and Little Miss Muffet, 
ANGELA STANLEY, try to find their way to the Halloween party. 

■4 (Left) KELLY PONDER, KAREN SPEIGHTS, ALLEN KEY, and KAREN 
PREWETT take a break from studying. 



DELTA SIGMA PI DELTA SIGMA PI DELTA SIGMA PI DELTA SIGMA PI DELTA SIGMA PHI DELTA SIGMA PI DELTA 




Row One: Julie Anna James, Karen Prewett, Laura Buhler, Tracy Windham, Row Two: Dale Dikes, Suzanne Holifield, Janie Maddox. Norma Brannan. Karen Speights. Row 
Three: Melissa Pettey, Angelia Moore, Kelly Ponder, Stephanie Reed. Stacey Fountain, Dian Hartzler, Jerrolyn Martin. Stacy Mitchell. Alan Key. Row Four: David Collon. Ste- 
ven Brown, Rob Cox, Renee Lee, Barry Smithmier. 



Organization^ 21? 







► (Right) Eagle Connection mem- 
bers recruit at local schools. 




214 Organizations 



CONNECTION 




Row One: DAPHANE HO, KRISTA POPE, ERIC BOUNDS, BILLY 
STEWART, MIKE JOHNSON, LAURA NATIONS, WYNDE JONES. 
Row Two: HEIDI HUDSON, BELINDA FISHER, RANDY RAGGIO, 
SCOTT MCNALLY, ANGELA FISHER, JOY ADAMS, MICHELLE 

JEROME. Not Pictured: LINDA NORMAN. 




RANDY RAGGIO 
PRESIDENT 



Eagle Connection is the student 
branch of the Office of Recruitment. 
The organization's main objective is to 
help prospective students find a college 
home while providing a student's per- 
spective of life at USM. 

Eagle Connection represents USM at 
several on-campus programs, such as the 
Fall Festival, Scholar's Day, and USM's 
Presidential Scholarship Competition, 
Also, the Eagle Connection represents 
USM at off-campus activities. 



EAGLE CONNECTION EAGLE CONNECTION EAGLE CONNECTION EAGLE CONNECTION EAGLE CONNECTION EAGLE 




•^ (Left) High school students are 
greeted by enthusiastic Eagle Con- 
nection members. 



Organizations 215 




FASHION PLUS FASHION PLUS/GEORGE HURST EDUCATION SOCIETY/FASHION PLUS FASHION PLUS/GEORGE HURS 



GEORGE HURST EDUCATION SOC . 



T 



: 




DEBORAH ROBERTSON 
PRESIDENT 



The Student Education Associ- 
ation is open to all teacher educa- 
tion majors. Affiliated with the 
Mississippi Association of Educa- 
tors and the National Education 
Association, its primary goal is to 
provide numerous opportunities 
for preservice teachers to be in- 
volved in professional activities. 

)rgani7.utions 




DR. BOBBY MOORE, DEBORAH ROBERTSON, 
COOPER Not Pictured: CINDY BOWDEN 



ISA PEAVY, KELLEE LEWIS, SALLIE 



M 



GAMMA BETA PHI 




Gamma Beta Phi 
is an honorary and 
service fraternity 
for men and women. 
Membership is open 
to those students 
who are among the 
top 20 percent of 
their class. Mem- 
bers sustain their 
status by maintain- 
ing a good grade 
point average and 
earning at least five 
service points per 
semester. 



GAMMA BETA PI GAMMA BETA PI GAMMA BETA PI GAMMA BETA PI GAMMA BETA PI GAMMA BETA PI GAMMA BETA 




GOLD TENDERS 





GOLD TENDERS GOLD TENDERS/GOLDEN GIRLS GOLDEN GIRLS GOLD TENDERS GOLD TENDERS/GOLDEN GIRLS GO 



GOLDEN GIRLS 



The USM Golden Girls is an 
organization of women who aid 
the USM football department 
in recruiting, office work and 
public relations. Applicants are 
chosen on their knowledge of 
the campus and the football 
program. Each member deco- 
rates a football locker for each 
game and recruits prospective 
football signees. 



Row One: VIRGINIA MOORE, TONI 
MEADOWS, MICHELLE MAPP, DIX- 
IE SHEPHARD, BARBIE SNOW, JUS- 
TIN HOWE, CARISSA MORTON, 
KELLY CRAWFORD, RENEE HUEY. 
Row Two: MARLA RAYNER, KIM 
SUTTON, YVETTE BURDON, PAULA 
SHOWS, MONA HUDSON, MONICA 
EASTERLING, ANNETTE MCKEN- 
NIS, KRISTI GREGG, LAURIE 
BROCK, STEPHANIE BREWTON. 




U 
US 



218 Organizations 



rTIT FITTIM If TTV 




The Golden Key National Honor So- 
ciety has been on the USM campus for 
several years and has proven to be very 
active. To become a member of the orga- 
nization, one must have sixty hours of 
college credit and be in the top fifteen 
percent of their class. Also, Golden Key 
chooses honorary members annually in 
the fall at the initiation banquet. 






Row One: Herald Williams, Mrs. Mary Dane Gregg, Jim Criss, Debbie Wharton, Trudy Calhoun, Casey 
Pursley, Doug Wise, Brian Hrabovsby, Dorene Schrut Row Two: Shannon Tullos, Lori Parker, Kim Miller, 
Cathy Richarde, Natalie Davis, Amy Sutt, John Boyer, Bill Schlicher Row Three: Kris Schroyer, Alice Joseph, 
Randy Raggio, E. Vuong Nguyen, Carla Rush, Leslie Cuccaro, Stacey Wert7, Stephen Glenn, John Blackwell, 
Carlos Slawson, Pablo Dopico, Stephen Rook 



GOLDEN KEY GOLDEN KEY/HOMEBUILDERS' ASSOCIATION HOMEBUILDERS 1 ASSOCIATION/GOLDEN KEY GOLDEN 

HOMEBUILDERS' ASSOCIATION 




Row One: DAVID LOWERY, PATRICK FURR, MONTY OVERSTREET, CHERIE SHOWS, DOUG- 
LAS MCGOWEN. Row Two: DALE MORAN. JACOB PAYNE, JOHN GILMORE. 




jfe 



_ 



JOHN GILMORE 
PRESIDENT 



The Homebuilders Association 
provides individuals an outlet to meet 
local and national contractors. These 
meetings occur in Hattiesburg, Jack- 
son, and Atlanta. This organization 
also provides literature on new pro- 
ducts and trends in the industry. 



Organizations 



r 



HONOR STUDENT ASSOCIATION 




HONOR STUDENT ASSOCTION/INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS/HONOR STUDENT ASSOCIATION/INTERNATIONAL 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 




william anding 
president: 



The International Relations 
Club is composed of Interna- 
tional and American students 
at USM. This club provides an 
active and exciting program of 
social, educational and cultural 
events. This club also helps stu- 
dents on all aspects of being a 
part of the melting pot of USM. 



220 Organizations 




KAPPA MU EPSILON 




Row One: DR. WALLACE PYE, LAURA BROWN, ELIZABETH PAGE, THERESA KELLY, JULIE 
DUGGAN Row Two: DANIEL LIGAS, KAREN FAWCETT, DR. BARRY PIAZZA, MRS. ALICE 
ESSARY 



■ 72 




ELIZABETH PAGE 
PRESIDENT 



Kappa Mu Epsilon is a collegeiate 
honor society for outstanding achieve- 
ment in math at the undergraduate level. 
Its purpose is to promote further interest 
in math and help members realize and 
understand the important role math 
plays in contemporary society as well as 
the role it has played in the development 
of civilization. 



KAPPA MU EPSILON KAPPA MU EPSILON/LSD GOSPEL CHOIR LSD GOSPEL CHOIR/KAPPA MU EPSILON KAPPA MU 

LSD GOSPEL CHOIR 




The Love Salvation Deter- 
mination Gospel Choir con- 
ducts several activities such 
as BIBLE studies, and visita- 
tion to local churches. The 
LSD Gospel Choir helps stu- 
dents to be led through song 
to Christ. 



Row One: CENOVIA BURNES, CAROL HILLARD, FAYTRA POLLOCK, TAMMIE HAYES, BRU- 
NETTE SMITH, RERRO WILLIAMS, DEMETRIUS PITTMAN Row Two: NICOLE WILLIAMS, PA- 
TRICIA SEALS, VERONICA BARFIELD, BENARD ADAMS, LINDA LILLY, DENISE RUSH, JACK- 
IE PITTMAN 



Organizations 221 




DAVID KRONLAGE 
PRESIDENT 



LAMBDA 

SIGMA 

SOCIETY 



Lambda Sigma Society is a na- 
tional honor society for sophomore 
men and women dedicated to the 
purpose of fostering leadership, 
scholarship, fellowship, and the 
spirit of service among college stu- 
dents, and to promoting the inter- 
ests of the college or university in 
every possible way. 



Row One: Shanna Holloway, Kelly Robinson, Tynia Crews, Kay Pinnix, Dane Prestridge, Tiffany Revon, Shea 
Broom, Kermit Kwan, Rene King Row Two: Ken Difatta, Kayla Cox, Robert Kalka, Monica Abney, Hollie Grey, 
Rhoma Johnson, Marc Bratton, David Kronlage, Heather McKee, Stephen Howell Row Three: Barbara Ross — 
Adviser, Michelle Jerome, Randy Raggio, Krista Pope, Billy Stewart, Kenton McNeese, Samantha Oaks, Beth 
Potin, Leigh Ann Wilcox, Jeffrey Johnson — Adviser, Molly Thomas, Rachel Jerome 



LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA SIGMA LAMBDA SIGMA 





222 Organizations 



±~ 



MINORITY ENGINEERS 




MINORITY ENGINEERING MINORITY ENGINEERING/PARALEGAL SOCIETY PARALEGAL SOCIETY MINORITY 

PARALEGAL SOCIETY 




The Paralegal Society is a 
professional organization for 
Paralegal Majors. The soci- 
ety meets regularly to dis- 
cuss items of interest to the 
membership. The goal of the 
society is to provide leader- 
ship experience and profes- 
sional contacts for its mem- 
bers. 



Row One: RHONDA MALONE, LISA POWELL, STACIE AUSTIN, MYRA TOLAN Row Two: RHONDA 
PACE, ANGIE SALIBA, LISA BAILEY — VICE PRESIDENT, TAMMY THOMPSON 



Organizations 223 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 




Omicron Delta Kappa 
membership is awarded to 
junior and senior students 
on the basis of character 
and eligibility in five ma- 
jor phases of campus life: 
scholarship, athletics, so- 
cial service and religious 
activities and campus in- 
volvement. The group rec- 
ognizes and encourages 
exemplary character. 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA OMICRON DELTA KAPPA OMICRON DELTA KAPPA OMICRON DELTA KAPPA OMICRON 




-: 



PHI BETA LAMBDA 




Row One: BECKY MCSWEYN, TAMMY AHREND, GWEN LADNER, ANGELA GRAYSON, NISHA PATEE, 
JAMES WHITE, Row Two: SHARON HOWELL, MELISSA PITTMAN, KAREN GALYOUN, CAROL WIL- 
LIAMS, CHAROLETTE WILLIAMS, KATHY WILLIAMS, VINCENT CLARK, Row Three: LES ROBINSON, 
JOEL HAMMOND, MATT DUNN, NIKKITTA HAMMOND, LOUIS MCLENDON, BRAD SMITH, GORDON 
LADNER, Row Four: MARY CORBELLO, SCOTT MATTHEWS, DEBBY HILL, MICHAEL OSBORNE, SU- 
ZANNE HOLIFIELD, BELINDA RABBY, MELISSA PETTEY, LISA JAMES, Row Five: HENRY WARD, GREG 
DALE, DARBY COMBS, DALE COKER. 





BRAD SMITH 
PRESIDENT 



Phi Beta Lambda pro- 
motes competent, aggressive 
business leadership. Its goals 
are to take students and de- 
velop them into tomorrow's 
leaders. 

The club competes on 
state and national level in 
business events such as mar- 
keting, management, busi- 
ness decision making and 
speaking. 



PHI BETA LAMBDA PHI BETA LAMBDA PHI BETA LAMBDA PHI BETA LAMBDA PHI BETA LAMBDA PHI BETA LAMBDA 




BRAD SMITH 
HOLIFIELD - 
LISA JAMES - 
DALE COKER 



- President, SUZANNE 
Executive Vice President. 
Accounting Vice President. 
- Vice President Business 



Administration, TAMMY AHREND - 
Treasurer, ANGIE GRAYSON — Secretary, 
VIN CLARK— Reporter, GORDON 
LADNER — Historian, RALPH SOLES - 

Photographer. 



Organizations 225 



_— 




Melinda Ory 
President 



PUT 

Jl JnLl 

THETA 



The Beta Alpha chapter of Phi Chi 
Theta, a professional business fraternity 
for women, promotes the cause of higher 
business education and training for all 
women, fosters high ideals for career 
business women, encourages coopera- 
tion among those women training for 
business careers, and stimulates the spir- 
it of sacrifice and unselfish devotion to 
the attainment of such ends. 




PHI CHI THETA PHI CHI THETA PHI CHI THETA PHI CHI THETA PHI CHI THETA PHI CHI THETA PHI CHI THETA PHI 



Row One: Dane Pres- 

tridge, Christine Corona, 
Kelli Pique, Michael 
Grahm, Jodie Gillespie, 
Jilaine Melvin, Selena 
Cook, Tiffany Revon, 
Row Two: Philip Frye, 
Tony Palazzo, Melinda 
Ory, Reese Widemire, 
John Wichman, Natalie 
Garnett. 



226 Organizations 




PHI DELTA RHO 




Phi Delta Rho is a senior 
women's honor society that is 
the highest honor that can be 
bestowed upon women on the 
USM campus. Membership is 
based on outstanding scholar- 
ship, leadership, and service to 
the campus. Phi Delta Rho is 
responsible for the selection of 
the outstanding freshman fe- 
males and recognize these stu- 
dents at a banquet each spring. 



Row One: Kim Evans, Sheri Golden, The- 
resa Kelly, Nichole Turner, Krista Pope. 
Leigh Wilcox, Tanquela Jones, Christ) 
Swindle, Francelia Williams, Amy Sutt, 
Rhonda Geske, Chrystal Sumrall, Row 
Two: Pamela Sanford, Cara Slusher, Lau- 
rie Brock, Sabrina Johnson, Shannon Tul- 
los, Danelle Perez, Lauren Watkins, Kay 
Koeppel, Laura Canda, Laura Gillis, Bren- 
da Garner. 



PHI DELTA RHO PHI DELTA RHO PHI DELTA RHO PHI DELTA RHO PHI DELTA RHO PHI DELTA RHO PHI DELTA RHO 




MOST 

OUTSTANDING 

FRESHMAN 

WOMEN 



Ann Leaumont, 


Natalie 


Breland. 


Dana 


Sellers — Most 


Oustanding Freshman Woman, Jeninfer 


Pace 


Jill White. 


Not Pictured — 


- Nicole 


Barthes. 









Organizations 227 



T>WT IVff T AT PHA QTMTrOlVTA 




CLIFTON TAYLOR 
PRESIDENT 



The Eta Phi Chapter of 
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia was 
founded on the USM cam- 
pus in 1957. This organiza- 
tion encourages and actively 
promotes the highest stan- 
dards of creativity, perfor- 
mance and education 



I. , - i 




PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA PHI MU ALPHA/PRSSA PRSSA PRSSA PRSSA PRSSA/PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA 



i- 



PRSSA 




3) 



JULIE HAWKINS 
PRESIDENT 



The USM PRSSA chap- 
ter, the only chapter in Mis- 
sissippi, offers students op- 
portunities for training and 
experience, which can insure 
a much smoother transition 
between college and the job 
market. 



228 Organizations 




Row One: DANA LOGUE, MELISSA SCHEUERMANN, LINDA BROGAN, LINDA SCIANNA, DEBBIE 
BURCH Row Two: JULIE HAWKINS, LINDA HOOD, LINDA FLYNN, ANGELA CALDER, PETER HESKETH, 
LORI SHARP Row Three: WILLIAM MOAK, VIRGINIA RATCLIFF, LEIGH HARBER, CHUCK HINSON, 
KRIS KIRBY, STEPHANIE WATSON Row Four: JOE TRAHAN, TODD ADAMS, MATT KENDRICK, WIL- 
LIAM NORRIS, SHAWN SPENCE 



c 



RECREATION MAJORS ASSOC . 




Row One: CARLA MCNALLY, ANNETTE DAUPHIN, MEGAN CHAPMAN, PAM THOMPKINS, ALICE NOR- 
MAN, ZELIA WEST, BRANT THORN, VIRGINIA BUDDLEY, SUSAN SCHWEIZER Row Two: DR. ELLARD, 
JOHN LOVETT, DAVID GREEN, ALLEN CHAPMAN, CHRIS CHAPMAN, CHRIS BUNYARD, KEN 
ROSSER, HAROLD GRAY, DERRICK JOHNSON Not Pictured: CLAIRE STOCKTON, KIM JONES, VIE ANNE 
BROWN 




RECREATION MAJORS ASSOCIATION RECREATION/RHO EPSILON RHO EPSILON/ RECREATION MAJORS 



RHO EPSILON 




Row One: LESLIE POWELL, TOMMY GRIFFITH, STACEY HOBGOOD, LISA POWELL Row Two: STEVE 
PERRY, GARY SEYFARTH, JENNIFER BELLAMY, GEORGE OPENSHAW, RICHARD WALKER CA- 
MERON DICKET, BILLY MORGAN. 




Oreanizations 229 




SCOTT 

KERSH 

PRESIDENT 



The purpose of the 
Residence Hall Asso- 
ciation is to coordinate 
campus-wide pro- 
grams and resident 
hall programs, to as- 
sess the needs, desires, 
and opinions of the 
residents, to develop 
student leadership and 
responsibility and to 
provide services to resi- 
dents. 

RHA reviews and 
makes recommenda- 
tions upon university 
and residence life poli- 
cies and procedures 
and serves as a liaison 
between residents and 
the administration for 
the betterment of the 
resident halls. 




▲ (Above) SCOTT KERSH 
presents SANDRA CLERK a 
plaque in appreciation of her 
dedicated service to RHA. 

► (Right) SCOTT KERSH, 
ERIC CALHOUNE and SAN- 
DRA CLERK take a break 
from the carpet sale from which 
RHA made $650. 

► (Far right) Hall residents en- 
joy a RHA-sponsored cookout. 




RESIDENCE 

HALL 

ASSOCIATION 






▼ (Below) RHA members love to have fun in the RHA Activity Center. 




I 





I 



J 



SPfe ' 




230 Organizations 






<U«F* 




XvJFXxjL 




RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION RESIDENT HALLRESID 











A (Above) The 1990 vice-president, John Glass, works on 
one of the computers that can be found in the activity center. 



A (Above) RHA sponsored the annual Trykes for 
Tykes program which pruchased 45 tricycles for needy 
children in the area. 



On October 20-22 sev- 
eral RHA members at- 
tended the South Atlantic 
Affiliated College and 
University Residence 
Hall Association. 

The SAACURH was 
held in Roanoke, Va. and 
was attended by more 
than 60 other universities 
and colleges. The event 
consisted of workshops on 
subjects ranging from 
"How to run an effective 
meeting" to "Relax- 
ation." 



Organizations 231 



HTCKM AN HAT T 




■Bnnn 




Row One: Kimalon Campbell, Alicia McNease, Ava Crosby, Michelle Therrell, Ginny Wray, Deanna Davo, Tammy Callaway, Melissa Tidewell, Lori Girlott, Jennifer 
Dendinger. Row Two: Cindy Broody, Jan Brady, Cathy Moore, Primrose Walker, Tunja Shelton, Veronica Andrews. Row Three: Marsha Brady, Annette Stewart, Samantha 
Mahler, Melissa Schjerven, Torsha Perry, Nichelle Webber. 



RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS 



Without the resident halls, 
USM may see a tremendous loss in 
the student population. The resi- 
dent halls house students from all 
backgrounds and nationalities. 
The halls provide leadership, guid- 
ance and support to their resi- 
dents. The residence hall staffs 
and governs events for the halls 
geared to provide for the needs of 
the students and to promote a 
sense of community development. 



RESIDENT 
HALLS 



232 Organizations 



HATTIESBURG HALL 




Row One: Pat Peterson, Marty Fitts, Chris Culrer, Glenn Bradley, David Likins, Chip Johnson Row Two: Ricky Johnston, Timothy Reynolds, James Sullivan, Tammy Cook. 
Dan Reiling, Temeca Smith, LaWanda Daniels Row Three: Landry Prichard, Ronald Stancil, David Garman, Doug Watts, Marrcelles Pittman, Mike Winger, Marilyn 
Blond, Eric Hook, Chris Jones, Chris Sather, Robert Youngblood, Mark Gibson, Havon Knight, Chris Atkinson, Mike Beland 



RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS RESIDENT HALLS 

HILLCREST HALL COUNCIL 




Row One: Kendra Mingo, Donna Prince, Alison Butler, Michele Swindle, Lisa Smith Row Two- Syliva Clark 
Jennifer D.rden Satoya Thompkins, Sharron Sweazy, Linda Lilly, Trena Carter Not Pictured: Rhonda Wilson' 
sarah Acosta, Robbie Kesler 





DONNA PRINCE 
PRESIDENT 



The Hillcrest Hall Council 
represents the resident's inter- 
est in matters such as visitation 
hours and vending services for 
halls, and communicates these 
interests to the RHA. The 
council also assists in promoting 
a community atmosphere. 



Organizations 233 



AIR 
FORCE 

CORPS 



IR FORCE 

WSmUm wmrmw 



Row One: Andrew English, Robin 
Daugherty, Russell Kirkpatrick, Todd 
Barrier, Russell Voce, Ira Burdine, Dan 
Reiling, Barbara Jones, Vicki Jackson, 
Robert Smith, Chris Murphy, Theresa 
Kelly, Richard Frye, James Lawrence, 
Bill Deeb, James Pease, Merri Evans. 
Row Two: Ren Brown, Farris Lewis, 
Hiram Harris, Chris Alley, Shiwanda 
Harris, Vera Chariot, Ed James, Teenie 
Powers, Vince Talazac, Chip Johnson, 
Jammie Pepoles, Frank Beaupre, Ste- 
ven Kellett, Jack Keene, Shane Ballow, 
Maria Barbaree, Shane Evans. Row 
Three: Ralph Soles, Corey Hunt, Troy 
Middleton, Richard Roche, Charles 
Stanley, Edward Voynick, Tracy Pat- 
ton, Chip Van Alstyne, Andrea Cartier, 
Damon Reynolds, Darron Stewart, 
Darryl Neal, Scott Mallette, Shannon 
Hailes, David Rose, Chris Mackey, 
Stan Sollie, Russell Adcox. 




AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE 



The Air Force ROTC is 
an educational program de- 
signed to provide college stu- 
dents the opportunity to be- 
come Air Force commis- 
sioned officers while 
completing requirements for 
an undergraduate or gra- 
duate degree. 

Students enroll in Aero- 
space Studies in the same 
manner as for other college 
courses. There is no obliga- 
tion for the first two years of 
AFROTC unless you have 
an AFROTC scholarship. 
After completing the first 
two years, you may compete 
for the Professional Officer 
Course during the last two 
academic years remaining in 
college. 



Capt. John F. Rivero 
Asst. Professor of 
Aerospace Studies 



Sgt. Kerry S. Geroux 
Administration NCO 



Sgt. Joe Riley Jr. 

Detachment 432 

NCOIC 




v 4> 


b 




Capt. Michael E. Medders 
Asst. Professor of 
Aerospace Studies 



Sgt. Stallings 



Lenise Young 



234 Organizations 






IT- 



ROTC 




ARNOLD 

AIR 

SOCIETY 



Row One: Shane Evans. 
Mary Evans, Andrew 
English, Robert Smith, 
Robin Daugherty, The- 
resa Kelly. Row Two: 
Charles Stanley, Dan 
Reiling, Chris Mackey, 
Chip Van Alstyne, Bar- 
bara Jones. Row Three: 
Richard Frye, Richard 
Roche, Andrea Cartier, 
Ralph Soles 



ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR FORCE ROTC AIR 




Color 
Guard 



Color Guard members 
are: Chris Murphy, 
Chris Mackey, Dan Reil- 
ing, Robin Daugherty. 
Theresa Kelly. Richard 
Frve. 



Organizations 235 



ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 



FACULTY 

AND 

STAFF 




M K3 


U 



ETC DAVID SENNE 

DEPARTMENT 

CHAIR 



SGM TRUIT 

BREAZEALE 

SERGEANT MAJOR 









■l| 


I 


ft. 


\ I 




MAJ TERRY 
LANDRUM 



MAJ RICK STEVENS 



CPT TRENT 

ENSLEY 



CPT HENRY 
GALLANT 




CPT RAE MCINNIS 



CPT MARK 
TERRILL 



SFC JOHN 
GLEASON 






SFC MIKE JAEGER 




SFC GARRY 
SHOEMAKER 



SSG MARY LANG 



SGT JULIE ODELL 



SGT DAVID 
WILLIAMS 






MRS. BECKY TEW 



MS. DOROTHY 
WILLIAMSON 



MS. MICHELLE 
JOHNSON 




ARMYROTC 



236 Organizations 



THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE YOU CAN TAKE. 



:= 



ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 







ARMY 

CADET 

BATTALION 

STAFF 



Row One: C/CSM 
Greg Michel, C/ 
LTC Ulysses Milton, 
C/MAJ Gregory 
Holifield, C/CPT 
Greg Peacock, Row 
Two: C/CPT 
Bernard Zachary, 
C/MAJ Da»id 
Kelley, C/CPT 
AmyDucksworth, f / 
MAJ Patty Young 



ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY 





ARMYROTC 



ARMY 

ROTC 

RANGER 

COMPANY 



Row One: Marty 
Fitts, Ikuo Makino, 
Mark Montgomery. 
Stewart Stephenson. 
Keth Magee. John 
Aleuedo. Rashann 
Harris, Greg 
Peacock, Row Two: 
Michael Jaeger 
SFC, Brian Speagle. 
Charles Connell. 
Darrel Speed, 
Eugene Christen, 
Michael D. Henry, 
Gregory A. 
Holifield. David 
Kelley. Douglas W. 
Epperson MSG. 



THE SMARTEST COLLEGE COURSE TOU CAN TAKE. 



Organizations 237 



\f 



ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 



i! 



MILITARY 

rv 



Row One: C. ALLEN, C. 
ANDERSON, S. BLESSE, 
E. BONEY, W. CA- 
MERON, T CHANCE- 
LOR, E DEDEAUX. M. 
FITTS, T GUTHRIE, R 
HARRIS, M.HENRY Row 
Two: J. BROWN, M 
AEWES, J JOHNSON, M. 
JOHNSON, J MILLER, J 
PEACOCK, J PEOPLES, 
C. PRICE, R. QUINLAN, 
G RINEHART. M 
SMITH, Row Three: M. 
SPOTORNO, S STE- 
PHENSON, M. STONER, 
J TAUBOT, S. THORN- 
TON, H TURNAGE, K. 
WHITE, G WOLVER- 
TON, D, KELLEY, G. 
PEACOCK, B ZA- 
CHARY, A DUCKS- 
WORTH, G. MICHEL, G. 
HOLIFIELD, P YOUNG 




ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC 



MILITARY 

SCIENCE 

III 

CLASS 



Row One: JOHN ACE 
VEDO, CURT ALLEN 
WINSTON AUSMOR 
WILLIAM CARRUTH 
HELENE CLARK, VI 
DAL CLAY, BRIAN 
COLE, GREGORY Dl 
VINITY, JEFFERY ETH 
ERIDGE, Row Two: WIL 
LIAM FAHNER, ROSS 
FREEMAN, LACURYA 
HOWARD, KAY LIND- 
SEY, JESSE LONG, MI- 
CHELLE LUMPKIN, 
PAUL LUQUET, 

KEEATH MAGEE, 

DWAYNE MOSS, Row 
Three: ROBERT ORR, LA- 
TONIA PETTIS, JOHN 
RIMES, KANDY SEA- 
TON. JEFFERY SIS- 
TRONLZ, PAUL SWA- 
GERTY, ROBERT 

WAI KIR 




ARMY ROTC 



THI SMMTIST COUXGt CMTUE TOT CM TMI 



238 Organizations 



E= 



ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 




ARMY 

ROTC 

SCABBARD 

AND 

BLADE 



Row One JOHN 
BROWN — PRES.. 
MARK JOHNSON 
V PRES., TODD 
STONER, DA\ II) 
KELLEY. KEN 

WHITE, CREIG AL- 
LEN, Row Two 
CHERYL ANDER- 
SON, JERRY JOHN- 
SON, WILLIE CA- 
MERON. CHESTER 
PRICE, ROD QUIN- 
NAN, MICHAEL 
HENRY, Row Three: 
AMY DUCKS- 

WORTH. MICHAEL 
SMITH, STAN 

THORNTON. MAT- 
THEW SPOTORNO. 
GREGORY MICHEL. 
PAT YOUNG 



\RMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC ARMY ROTC 




ARMY 

ROTC 

COLOR 

GUARD 



STEWART STE- 
P H E N S O N , 
MARTY FITTS 
COMMANDER. 
KANDY SEATON, 
Not Pictured: STE- 
VEN BLESSE. 
JESSE LONG. 
KEEATH MAGEE, 
JEFF ETHERIDGE 



ARMY ROTC 



THE SMMTEST COLLEGE COOKE TOO CM TAKE 



Organizations 239 




STUDENT 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 



240 Organizations 



It- 



If Till " : :: 










A (Above) Brad Giaconc and Heather Mckee take 
break from the legislative weekend. 




The Student Alumni Association 
assists students in becoming actively 
involved with former students (alum- 
ni) and to inform Southern under- 
grads as to how the Alumni Associ- 
ation works to bridge the gap between 
the campus and the alumni through 
supportive activities and to involve 
students with many organized alumni 
functions. 



•^ (Far left) These Student Alumni mem- 
bers have a "little fun" at the convention in 
Pigeon Forge, Tenn. 



■4 (Left) These 


; Student Alumni 


mem 


bers 


take time for a 


picture from the 


long 


bus 


ride to Pigeon 


Forge, Tenn. 







Organizations 241 




ROTORACT 



The Rotoract Club is a 
service-minded student 
organization that is spon- 
sored by Rotorary Club 
International. Criteria for 
membership is a mini- 
mum 2.0 cumulative 
grade point average and 
willingness to undertake 
service projects that bene- 
fit both the university and 
the Hattiesburg commu- 
nity. 






OFFICERS: JULIE SMITH — 
PRESIDENT, ASHLEY RICH - 
VICE PRESIDENT, TONY 
PLAZZO — TREASURER, RE- 
BECCA MCKAY — PUBLIC 
RELATIONS DIRECTOR, 
WENDY WICHT — SECRE- 
TARY 




ROTORACT ROTORACT ROTORACT ROTORACT / SOCIAL WORK CLUB SOCIAL WORK CLUB / ROTORACT ROTORACT 



Row One: MOIRA O'CONNOR, 
JACKIE MOSLEY, CO-SAN- 
DRA BARNES, CAROL PEY- 
TON, VALERIE GORDON, AB- 
BIE LUCK. Row Two: PAULA 
COTTEN, JOHN DEWEESE, 
SALVADOR GOMEZ, JANET 
BLANK, CHRISTOPHER 
VEAL, SHARYN JOY, GAIL ES- 
TERS. 



SOCIAL WORK CLUB 



P* ttj^gS 

^B W" 






MOIRA O'CONNOR 
PRESIDENT 


The Social Work Club is a 
social service organization. 
It is aimed at increasing stu- 
dent's knowledge of social 
work while providing ser- 
vices to the community. 


M 1 




242 Organizations 



J- 



SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCE 
MENT OF MANAGEMENT 




OFFICERS 



Row One: PATTY TLC1I Treasurer, JULIANNA JAMES — President. Row 
Two: ALLEN BALLARD — Vice-President, N ICHOLAS ZERVAKOS — Vice- 
President, DR. DAVID DUHAN — adviser. 



JULIANNA 

JAMES 
PRESIDENT 



The Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management is a club 
composed of business majors 
whose goal is to prepare its mem- 
bers for a future in management. 
Through professional speakers, 
field trips, and fundraisers such as 
the fall semester's golf tournament 
the members learn to manage their 
time and coordinate the activities 
necessary to achieve the club's 
goals. 




Row One: DONNA MOR- 
RIS, JENNIFER YENT- 
ZEN, PATTY TUCH, JU- 
LIANNA JAMES. ANN 
SKRMETTI. Row Two: 
BETH TAYLOR. KIM- 
BERLY HOOPER. Row 
Three: DR. DAVID DU- 
HAN, MARK HUGEL, 
JOEY JENKINS. Row 
Four: HENRY WARD, NI- 
CHOLAS ZERVAKAS. 
ALLEN BALLARD. 



Organizations 243 



G^VT TT^T TT? TP 1ST CTVT T? 




SOUTHERN STYLE SOUTHERN STYLE SOUTHERN STYLE SOUTHERN STYLE SOUTHERN STYLE SOUTHERN STYLE SOL 



J> (Right) Row One: 
Chris Cogwell, David 
Staehling, Tommy 
Wales, Griff Glea- 
son, Rob McElhaney, 
Troy Frisbie, Row 
Two: Kade Moody, 
Debby Escher, Ste- 
phaine Watson, 
Stephanie Seymour, 
Sissy Lang, Angie 
Clepper, Brenda 
Garner, Nichole 
Turner, Danelle 
Perez, Scott Walter. 




244 Organizations 



;? 



SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

ASSOCIATION 

_ 




A (Above) Greg Sanchez, Heather McKee, Susan Spears, Jecyn Bremer, Lisa McDaniel, Linda Scianna, Wynde 
Jones, Sissy Lang, Rebecca Gloab, Julie Middlebusher, Doy Palmer, Dr. Charles Tardy 



i'EECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATON/STUDENT PRINTZ SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATON/STUDENT PRINTZ 



STUDENT PRINTZ 




The STUDENT 
PRINTZ, the unversi- 
ty's student-operated 
newspaper, underwent 
a growth period in the 
1989-90 school year, 
complemented by an 
increase in staff size 
and circulation. The 
staff of student editors, 
writers and photogra- 
phers nearly doubled 
in size, totalling 45 
staff members during 
the peak of the term. In 
addition, circulation 
rose for the first time in 
eighty years from 
6,700 copies to 7,200 
copies in February. 



A Row One: TRACEY YOST, MIKE ADAMS, KAREN PRESTRIDGE, PASCAL BALTHROP, JOHN DOE, 
MELODY MILES, JAMEY DOYLE, Row Two: KELLY RUSSELL, DR. JOHN WARREN, ANDREA HELM 
AIDRA MARTIN, CHANTEL FORETICH. CHRISTIE WHITE, DAMON COX, MIKE DOYLE, Row Three: 
RICK HAMMOND, LELA WALKER, STAN WEBB. SAM MCDONALD. SUSAN HEWITT MELISSA 
HOLDER. 



Oraanizations 245 



STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOC . 



The Student Dietetic Associ- 
ation consists of mostly of di- 
etetic or nutrition majors, but 
the organization is open to any 
student who has an interest in 
nutrition. The goals of the orga- 
nization are to promote good 
nutrition among faculty and 
students, to assist in recruiting 
dietetic/nutrition majors and to 
help promote good nutritional 
habits in the community. 




JEFF BRADY, JENNIFER 
LYNN - PRESIDENT, TOM- 
MIE HOSEY, SONYA SPEN- 
CER, STEVE EICK, LESLIE 
PHILLIPS, ROBERT WELCH, 
PATRICE MURRAY, JENNI- 
FER SMITH, TAMMY WIL- 
LIAMS. 







, 



STUDENT HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION/STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIATION/STUDENT HOME ECONOMICS ASSOC 



STUDENT HOME ECONOMICS 

ASSOCIATION 




WENbY 

WILLIAMS 
PRESIDENT 



The Student Home Econom- 
ics Association is primarily for 
students majoring in Home Eco- 
nomics or a closely related field, 
but is open to all USM students. 
The Association strives to stimu- 
late a greater interest in home 
economics as a profession to fos- 
ter and promote a closer rela- 
tionship among students major- 
ing in home economics, to devel- 
op leadership through home 
economics activities and to have 
students become familiar with 
other home economics associ- 
ations in the state and nation. 



246 Organizations 




ALICE JOSEPH, JOAN TRAYLOR, SONYA WEEKLY, STACY LOTT, WENDY WILLIAMS, HOLLY HOOK, 
JEFF BRADY, EVELYN ROMANS, VICKI CAYLOR, LYNELL ROGERS. 



Ko»c 
Row i 

PAH 
MICK 
FE11C 



STUDENT 
NURSES ASSOCIATION 



HATTIESBURG 



Row One: NANCY GARRETT, TERESA MASSENGALE, SHERI JAMES, S TEPIIANIE MOBI.I-.Y, I IK, II WALK- 
ER, TERRI YELVERTON. Row Two: KIM PHILLIPS, AMY CUMBERLAND, NANETTE REBLER, SHANNON 
CRUISE, SHELLEY POLK, JUDITH CREEL, NORA LANGFORD. Row Three: DEBBIE GREEN, BROOKE HILL, 
RHONDA PACE, GINGER MANFIELD, MARKEATA BOYD, SHELIA FORTENBERRY, CARISSA MORTON, 
KARYN KNIGHT, CAROLYN BAILEY, KIMBERLY WEST, PAM WAGGONER, KAREN MORGAN, DIANNE 
GAMBLE, CAROLYN WELCH, PHILIP DUEITT, LARRY HARIO, GEORGE HAIRE, BILLY PRATHER, SHAWN 
WALKER. 





NAM: I It 

REBLER 

PRESIDENT 



The Student Nursing As- 
sociation of Southern Missis- 
sippi (SNASM) is a pre-pro- 
fessional nursing association 
for students who are entering 
their junior year in the 
school of nursing. 



MERIDIAN 
BRANCH 




Row One: LAURA GRIMES, TOMIA BOOT, CONNIE MCALPIN, WILHLEMINA GRIFFIN, TERESA CHURCH. 
Row Two: MARY WHIGHAM, VICKIE PATTON, LINDA THOMAS, PEGGY SHARP, WENDY BUCHANAN, 
PATTI CLARK. Row Three: SANDRA JONES, PATRICIA MILLER, DEBRA BREWER, LAVONNE BROWN, 
MICKI PEAGLER, KAYE BOSWELL. Row Four: SANDY THOMPSON, JAN ROBINSON, VICKIE SHEPHARD. 
FELICIA PILGRIM, PATRICIA ALEXANDER, MARY HARRIS. LINDA DUNHAM. Row Five: VANESSA GRIF- 
FIN, ZANA WEBB, PAM TVARKUNAS. HELEN HUDNALL, REBECCA BOUNT. 




Organizations 247 



UNIVERSITY ACTIV 



UAC 
OFFICERS 



PHILIP DELLI- 
SOLA Music 

Chairman, DAVID 
COLLINS — Vari- 
ety Chairman, 
JOHN PALMER- 
TON — Advertising 
Chairman, JOANN 
HAGGERTY 
Secretary, LEE 
FARROW — Vari- 
ety Chairman, DA- 
VID SEARS 
President. 




[ 



UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERS 



UAC 

VARIETY 

COMMITTEE 

The Variety 
Committee is re- 
sponsible for sched- 
uling non-musical 
events for the stu- 
dent body. Their 
programming in- 
cludes scheduling 
movies, comedians, 
The Spring Fair and 
a variety of other 
events. 



Row One: LORI CHRIS- 
TENSEN, CHRISTINA 
DEMICHAEL, SEL1NA 
COOK, SEAN MCGHEE 
Row Two: LEE FARROW, 
DAVID LEBLANC, 
BRENT LA.IAUNIE, 
CHUCK WILLIAMS, DA- 
VID COLLINS. 







248 Organizations 



ITIES COUNCIL 




UAC 

MUSIC 

COMMITTEE 



The Music Committee of- 
fers a broad spectrum of 
musical entertainment to the 
USM community. They are 
in charge of scouting and 
signing musical talents on a 
large and small scale. The 
HOODOO GURUS and 
Will and the Bushmen per- 
formed in the Fall Semester, 
and Bad English performed 



ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 




UAC 

ADVERTISING 

COMMITTEE 



The Advertising 
Committee is the cre- 
ative outlet of the 
UAC. They are re- 
sponsible for promot- 
ing all UAC events. 



Clockwise from bottom left: 
DONNA MORRIS. 

BETHANY RLSHTON. 
LAURA BUHLER. AL- 
YCE BADEAUX, SARA 
SHIPLEY, KATIE 

CRAFT, JASON BLAKE. 
BENGIE TURNAGE, 
STEPHANIE DAVIS. 
DANIEL RICH. LINDA 
NORMAN. TERRY EAS- 
TER1 IN(i. ( Middle 
from left) JAN STROH- 
MEYER. JOHN PAL- 
MERTON. LORI 

COUNTS 



Organizations 249 



UAC 
MEMBERS 



Bottom: MARK HOWELL. 
Row One: LAURA 
BUHLER, LINDA NOR- 
MAN, CHRISTINA DE- 
MICHIEL, SELENA 
COOK, JULIE COT- 
TRELL, LISA BRIDGES, 
JOANN HAGGERTY, 
TAMI MIDDLETON. Row 
Two: DAVID COLLINS, 
LORI COUNTS, ALYCE 
BADEAUX, STEVE 
THOMAS, DONNA 
MORRIS, DAVID LEB- 
LANC, FRAN JONES, 
DAVID HUGHES. Row 
Three: LORI CHRISTEN- 
SEN, CHRIS NOLAN, 
JENNIFER STUDEBAK- 
ER, ALISON SCHUH, 
KATIE CRAFT, BOBBY 
BURGE, CHUCK WIL- 
LIAMS. Row Four: 
HEATHER REEVES, 
RICHARD RAPP, PHILIP 
DELLISOLA, JAN 

STROHMEYER, BRENT 
LAJAUNIE, DANIEL 
RICH, SEAN MCGHEE, 
BENJIE TURNAGE. Row 
Five: MARK WALLING, 
JOHN PALMERTON. 





UNIVERSITY 
ACTIVITIES COUNCIL 



250 Organizations 



W m2j&Ljm1j x mj \J U IN l3 A L Jl v-IIN 




IB # 






A (Top) The Wesley Foundation isn't 
all fun and games; these members are 
involved in a Bible study. 

▲ (Above) This Wesley Foundation 
puts the finishing touches on the shee- 
trock in a service project. 



MEMBERS OF THE WESLEY FOUNDATION 




UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL UNIVERSIT 





aTTCl" 

MCWILLIAMS 
DIRECTOR 



The Wesley Foundation is 
the United Methodist Church 
sponsored campus ministry. We 
seek to provide students with a 
place for Christian fellowship, 
personal growth, and challenge 
in becoming leaders within 
their fields of study. These are 
accomplished through: ( 1 ) loca- 
tion in a beautiful new building. 
(2) regular Bible study and dis- 
cussion, (3) regular outreach 
opportunities in missions and 
social concerns, (4) participa- 
tion in intramural sports, (5) 
regular opportunities for wor- 
ship and personal growth, (6) 
training seminars in leadership 
skills, and (7) frequent parties, 
trips, retreats and guest speak- 
ers. 



Wesley Foundation Fall Retreat 1989 



Organizations 251 



USM 
BANDS 



► (Right) Dr. Tom Fraschillo, director of Bands, con- 
ducts the USM Summer Band during an outdoor concert. 




USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS USM BANDS 




r r i | ; i ; ; , I I I f I I ^ f » , 



t « ■ r i t . -I. i • » I 

ft III ■ !«?«■! 

V * I I 



ft' "1 ** *r* 




•JL 




A (Above) As the exhibition band at this event, the "Pride" thrilled thousands with 
their "James Bond" Show. 



-4 (Left) Tracy Thrasher, a senior music education major from Belmont, Miss., served 
as rifle captain for the "Pride." 



252 Organizations 




•^ (Left) In addition to the marching band and the three concert organi- 
zations, the instrumental music program at USM includes two jazz 
ensembles, the USM Symphony Orchestra, the Basketball Pep Bands, 
Flute Choir, Clarinet Choir, Saxophone Choir, Trumpet Choir, Horn 
Choir, Trombone Choir, Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, Percussion En- 
semble and numerous brass and woodwind quintets. 




' ! ! ! » ■ « i ii 5 1 v - > • ' 1/' ' • s \ • J ; \ • vvVvQXS 

- .w/* tn I AAA* Nxk.Mii.:* k k^ 



fifci^H \ \ ' 



■ - ¥ 




i 



p I H I j * i i Tffi { t fVTTY ? ifVT*^ 



* f« **-# lit f f 






r*.>-r^-iMN3r» 





A (Above) The Wind Ensemble and the Symphonic Band performed at 
the 34th Annual Southern Instrumental Conductors Conference held on 
the USM Campus in February. 



▲ (Top) In addition to performances at four USM home football games, the "Pride" 
traveled in 1989 to both Auburn and the University of Alabama. 



Organizations 253 




254 Division Page 




Worth Our 
Weight In GOLD 




People 



On your way to class each day you can see a variety of people. They are as different as 
night and day. You can find them in different clothes, hairstyles, and each with an 
individual personality. Just as they all have different tastes, they also have varying 
interests, goals, and dreams. 

The people at Southern are athletes, professors, administration, exchange students, 
scholars, and just special people in general. We, the people at Southern, are "Worth 
Our Weight in Gold." || By Lorna Freeman 



Division Page 255 



► (Right) Dr. Aubrey Lucas poses for the 
camera in the one-room schoolhouse in the 
Owings-McQuagge Building. • Photo by 
G. M. Andrews 




A (Above) Dr. Lucas signs a gigantic 
birthday card for USM's 80th Birthday 
celebration. • Photo by Gary Haygood. ► 
(Right) Dr. Lucas congratulates Women's 
Basketball Coach Kay James following the 
Lady Eagles' victory over LSU in the first 
round of the NCAA playoffs. • Photo by 
Phil Hendrix 



256 President 




A Personal 
Interview 

"I still enjoy this job, and I do 
really enjoy being with the stu- 
dents — that's the fun of it all." 



4 



Dr. Aubrey K. Lucas 



As the leader of one of the state's largest universities, Dr. Lucas plays a very irrmdf tant role in promoting the development of the state's eco- 
nomic and educational resources. Obviously, his job is a busy one, but he does>rfKe time to reflect on the progress the university has made and 
plans for future growth. 

Dr. Lucas answered questions posed to him by USM student Heather McKee. 



EXPLAIN YOUR CONCEPT OF "THE UNIVERSITY/FOR 
THE NEW SOUTH." 

"The idea is not to imply that there was anything wj*fng with the 
Old South, or that nothing will be wrong with the/New South. We 
want to influence that difference. We are going to be active in 
economic development. We also want beUer health for our people. 
Another concern we are focusing on is education — for our teachers 
and children. And most im porta ntly^we want to preserve our past so 
that we can benefit from it, improve it, and not repeat those things 
that ought not to be repeal 

IN SEARCH OF EXCELLENCE, WHAT CAN WE AS STU- 
DENTS DO TO'HELP MAKE THE DIFFERENCE? 

"The besj^'tning for a student to do is to be a student. But be a 
GOOD student. Apply oneself while here and learn very diligently 
what/you're here to learn. This is the one time in your life where you 
rpaily need to pay attention to learning. You'll learn all your life, but 
you'll never have this opportunity for such concentrated, sustained, 
focused learning. Take advantage of out-of-class activities to Iparn 
to be leaders and to be followers." 

WHERE IS THE MAJOR EMPHASIS BEING P^T I I'll! 
90'S? 

"In the 90's we want to accelerate the progress of the 80's: contin- 
ue to build our faculty, evaluate our programs, etc. I am hoping that 
the work we've done in the 80's will aHow us to move faster in the 
90's. One thing we will be doing jrfuch more of is raising private 
funds. We have received some triajor gifts from some of our alumni 
and other people." 



WHAT DO YOU SEE ON THE HORIZON FOR USJ 

"Of course I see the completion of our Polymer Sciejfce facility. 
We will be doing some very significant research afihe facility. I 
would not at all be surprised at the number of patents that our 
faculty develop. We'll see more business an^industry coming into 
Hattiesburg to be close to the department and other areas of the 
sciences and businesses as well. We^re also working on a new 
recreation center that was funded/by a generous donation from some 
of our alumni. Architects aj^busy in the planning of the multi- 
million dollar Payne Cei 

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE SUCCESS AND THE FU- 
TURE OF OUR ATHLETIC PROGRAMS? 

"Our whgrle athletic department has had fantastic success. Three 
of our apograms, at one time or another in this year, were nationally 
rankea (football, women's basketball, and baseball). Going to the 
fCAA was very exciting and brought in an extra $286,000 per 
game. The future should be even better." 

IF AND WHEN YOU EVER HAVE A DAY OFF, WHAT DO 
YOU LIKE TO DO? 

"I love to go to New Orleans. I like to eat, browse and look at all 
the antique shops and bookstores — that's fun. I seldom have a day 
off but if I do I'll read or play the piano. I also like to go to Greene 
County where I grew up around State Line and walk in the woods. 
We tree farm, and so we (the family) will walk together through the 
farm. We have a lot of relatives and we enjoy each other." 




President 257 



Board of Trustees 




Pictured standing: CASS PENNINGTON, JAMES W. LUVENE, BRYCE GRIFFIS. Sitting: NAN MCGAHEY BAKER, W. RA 

SIDNEY L. RUSHING, J. MARLIN IVEY, JOE A. HAYNES, CLEERE, WILLIAMS M. JONES (PRESIDENT), WILL / 

FRANK O. CRASTHWAIT, JR., DIANE MILLER AND HICKMAN (VICE PRESIDENT), AND DIANNE P. WALTO> 

Administration 

Administrative Officers 







<-» -r> 



AUBREY KEITH LUCAS, 

President 



SIDNEY/E. L. WEATHERFORD, 

Dire<?for of Institutional Research 



LUCY SHOWS, 

Internal Auditor 



258 Administration 



Executive Assistant to the President 




CLYDE NEULAN 

G1NN, 

Executive Assistant to 

the President 



WILLIAM ELLIS 
KIRKPATRICK, 

Director of Publi; 
Relations 



RONALD 

DENMAN 

PHILLIPS, 

Director of Alumni 
Affairs 



Office of the Vice Pre 



lent for Academic Affairs 




JAMES G. 
HOLLANDSWORTH, 

Assistant to the Vice 

President for 

Academic Affairs 



ROBERT THOMAS 

VAN ALLER, 

Dean of the Graduate 

School 



HAROLD LUCE, 

Dean of the College 
of the Arts 



HAROLD TYRONE 

BLACK, 

Dean of the College 

of Business 

Administration 




PEGGY 

WHITMAN 

PRENSHAW, 

Dean of the Honors 

College 



JAMES R. 
MARTIN, 

University Librarian 



Administration 259 



Office of the Vice President for Research and Extended Services 




KAREN 
MARGUERITE 
YARBROUGH, 

Vice President 



S. EUGENE 
BARNES, 

Assistant to Vice 
President 



JOE EARL 
HOLLOWAY, 

Dean of USM-Gulf 
Coast 



- rtH W 

A 

JOSEPH EUGENE 

TINNON, 
Dean of the Division 
of Lifelong Learning 




JAMES SIDERS, 

Director of Affiliated 
University Programs 




rs* 





DONALD RAY 
COTTEN, 

Director of the Office 

Research and 
Sponsored Programs 



VERNETTA 
FAIRLEY, 

Director of Financial 
Aid 



TIM WILLIAM 
HUDSON, 

Head of the Center 

for International 

Education 



DANNY WAYNE 
MONTGOMERY, 
University Registrar 



WILLIAM 

CLARENCE 

SCRUGGS, JR., 

Director of the 
Computing Center 



260 Administration 




Office of the Vice Presideift for Business and Finance 











ROBERT 

HERRINGTON, 

JR., 

Director of Personnel 
Services 



HUGH M. WEST, 

Director of Budgets 



Administration 261 



Office of the Vice President 
for Student Affairs 







PETER EASTON 
DURKEE, 

Vice President 



WARREN DUNN, 

Administrative 

Assistant to the Vice 

President 



VIRGINIA 
CRAWFORD, 

Director of Student 
Health Services 



JOSEPH SCOTT 
PAUL, 

Assistant to the Vice 
President and Dean of 
Student Development 



SID GONSOULIN, 

Director of 
Recreational Sports 





JOANNE 

STEVENS, 

Dean of Special 

Services 



VRITA DELAINE, BARBARA L. 

Associate Dean of ROSS, 

Student Development Director of Union and 

Student Activities 



HOWARD 
MILLER, 

"Director of Public 
Safety 



ROBERT M. 
LOWE, 

Director of University 
Food Services 








-i> 



LORINDA KRHUT, 


BILL WAYNE 


CARL CONN 


MARTHA 


Director of Residence 


SHAFER, 


LAWRENCE, 


./MONTAGUE, 


Life 


Director of University 


Director of Placement y 


^Director of Greek 




Counseling Center 


Services / 


Life 



262 Administration 



Intercollegiate Athletics 




H. C. "BILL" 
MCLELLAN, 

Athletic Director 



MALCOLM K. 
TURK, 

Assistant Athletic 

Director and Head 

Men's Basketball 

Coach 



RALPH NIXON 
"NICK" FLOYD 
JR., 

Associate AMI leu 
Dipeetor 






V 



LOUIS M. 
MARCIANI, 

Associate Athletic 
Director 




DAVID BOUNDS, 

Assistant to the 
Athletic Director 



tf . * A 




DIANA KAY 


CURLEY HUDSON 


HILL H. DENSON, 


1HVIMY 


MARSHALL 


JAMES, 


HALLMAN, 


JR., 


CARPENTER, 


LENORD BELL 


Assistant to the 


Head Football Coach 


Head Baseball Coach 


S Golf Coach 


Track and Cross 


ilptfc Director and 








Country Coach 


omen's Basketball 










Coach 












ERNEST 

LAWRENCE 

HARRINGTOXT 

Head Trainer 





ELEN C. GRANT, 

Women's Volleyball 
and Softball Coach 



TEDDY VIATOR, 

Men's and Women's 

Tennis Coach 



STEVE MAPLES, 

Strength Coach 





M. REGIEL 
NAPIER, 

Sports Information 
Director 



JOHN COX, 

Director of Sports 
Broadcasting 




BEN 
WILLOUGHBY. 

Eagle Athletic Club 
Director 



Administration 263 




264 People 



STUDENTS 



HALL 




People 265 



Monica Abney, Slidell, La. 

Kristin Adams, Leland 

LaGina Adams, Meridian 

Todd Adams, Pascagoula 

Rusty Adcock, Mendenhall 

Danial Ahmed, Karachi, Pakistan 

Tammy Ahrend, Brookhaven 

Beth Ainsworth, Collins 

Jerry Ainsworth, Madison 

Joanna Albritton, Petal 

Terry Alcorn, Liberty 

James Alford, Meridian 

Vernita Alford, Enterprise 

Patrice Algero, New Orleans, La. 

Rachel Alinsunurin, Collinsville 

Eric Allen, Hattiesburg 

Joe Allen II, Magee 

Sharon Allen, Jackson 

Venetta Allen, Jackson 

Charles Allison, Laurel 

John Alliston, Saucier 

Candace Allred, Slidell, La. 

Jessica Allred, Collins 

Bradley Amacker, Hattiesburg 

Andrea Ambrose, Bay St. Louis 

Mahmoud Amjad 

Felissa Armistad, Columbus 

Gayle Anders, Natchez 

Barry Anderson, Brandon 

Cornelius Anderson, McComb 

Craig Anderson, Forest 

Elaine Anderson, Columbus 

Ernestine Anderson, George County 

Elizabeth Anderson, Hattiesburg 

Langdon Anderson, Philadelphia 

Laura Anderson, Laurel 

Martha Anderson, Purvis 

Michelle Anderson, Mobile, Ala. 

Mignyon Anderson, Magee 

Paula Anderson, Mobile, Ala. 

Tammy Anderson, Vicksburg 

Tiffany Anderson, Jackson 

William Anding III, Hattiesburg 

Twila Andrews, Moss Point 

Veronica Andrews, Gulfport 

Karla Antonelli, Amory 

Patrick Arbour, Baton Rouge, La. 

Chris Arcement, Pass Christian 

Mary Argus, New Orleans 

Steve Armstrong, Tylertown 

Stacy Arnold, Natchez 

Michael Arrington, Laurel 

Kendra Ashley, Crystal Springs 

Laura Ashley, Chicago, 111. 




266 People 




■^ (Left) Students and professors weni'fak- 
en to jail when the Criminal Justice De- 
partment held a jail day on campus. 
▼ (Below) This professQj^as arrested in 
the middle of a class- 



All LockedOJp 



This fall criminal justice stu- 
dents got some "hands on" train- 
ing. For a small fee, students could 
have a fellow student, or even 
professor arrested. They wfuld 
then be "incarceratedlXin the 
Union Lobby for an hour. 

Students played^fricks on their 
unsuspecting J¥iends and room- 
mates and Iprflled them out of class, 
naps apd even showers. One ad- 
vertftfrous Honors College student 



k^ru 




44 



hink it was a 
£reat idea to arrest 
the instructors. It 
was for a good 
cause, and we got 
out of class." 

— CLAY JAMES 



had Professor Jay Anglin arrested 
during a Freshman Colloquium 
class, mid-lecture. Although the 
class continued with Dr. Gary 
Stringer giving the lecture, the 
five-minute interruption was en- 
joyed by all. H By Ann Leaumont 



People 267 



Alicia Ashworth, Biloxi 

William Atkins, D'Iberville 

Chris Atkinson, Pearl River, La. 

Rachel Atkinson, Mandeville, La. 

Jessica Atteberry, Milton, Fla. 

Roland Austin, Hattiesburg 

Shannon Ayers, Crystal Springs 
Virginia Baddley, Clinton 

Alyce Badeaux, Thibodaux, La. 
Katrina Baggett, Jackson 
Carolyn Bailey, Bogalusa 
Cynthia Bailey, Okolonia 

Heather Bailey, Gulfport 

Lisa Bailey, Jackson 

Ruby Bailey, Terry 

Dreck Baker, Yazoo City 

Kelly Baker, Senatobia 

Holly Baldwin, New Orleans 

Lisa Ball, Gulfport 

James Balthrop, Mobile, Ala. 

Teri Sue Bankston, Covington, La. 

William Bargetzi, Huntsville, Ala. 

Rob Barham, Meridian 

Melissa Baria, Pascagoula 

Dwight Barker, Cleveland 

Sonny Barker, Ocean Springs 

Brian Barkley, Gulfport 

Co-Sandra Barnes, Natchez 

Jimmy Barnes, Laurel 

Monica Barnes, Jackson 

Ann Barnett, New Orleans 

Heather Barnett, Gretna, La. 

Kandy Barr, Petal 

Wendy Barrett, Jackson 

James Barrilleaux, Gulfport 

Lisa Barrios, Carriere 

Jennifer Barry, New Orleans 

Anne Bartee, Jackson 

Nicole Barthes, Ocean Springs 

Sharon Barton, Brandon 

Kimberly Bass, Gulfport 

Rolonda Bates, Brookhaven 

Myrna Batson, Gulfport 

Krisstina Baucum, Picayune 

Lisa Baugh, Mt. Hermon, La. 

Mollie Bayhi, Metairie, La. 

Louise Baylis-Daniels, Columbia 

Andrew Beamon, Lena 

Trisha Beamon, Lena 

Angela Bean, Kokomo 

Barry Beard, Laurel 

Tanya Beard, Jackson 

Julie Beaupre, Biloxi 

Richard Beckford, Kingston, Jamaica 



268 People 





mmmmmmmmm 




Personally^! U 



The plain seven digit-letter com- 
bo is a thing of the past. Many 
students at Southern are rapidly 
trying to express themselves wh 
personalized car tags. The/cost 
varies from county to county but it 
usually ranges from $L^to $35 ad- 
ditional charge pep^year. 

Almost anything with seven let- 
ters or less^ean be ordered on the 
tag. Thenars around campus may 
be tb€ same color and model, but 
rch tag has something to say to 



I chose to put 
USM 22 on my tag 
because Pm #22 on 
the baseball team, 
and I support 
USM." 

— LARRY WESSON 



the other drivers. Some examples 
of tags seen include: IOPOP2, 
NVME, FSTOP, MIX ME1 and 
UCKIM. || By Lorna Freeman 



People 269 



Nikkitta Beckley, Crystal Springs 

Kate Bedenbaugh, Hattiesburg 

Lisa Bedwell, Prentiss 

Mike Beland, Slidell, La. 

John Belham, Gulfport 

Heather Bell, Columbia 

Kelvin Bell, Vicksburg 

Kimberly Bell, Columbia 

Jennifer Bellamy, Gautier 

Shannon Gellatti, Slidell, La. 

Cheryl Benjamin, Columbia 

Beatrice Bennett, Picayune 

Chris Bennett, Slidell, La. 

Jason Bennett, Bradenton, Fla. 

Miriam Bennett, Jackson 

Julia Benton, Metairie, La. 

David Berard, Luling, La. 

Todd Berrier, Panama City, Fla. 

Chandra Berry, Jackson 

Dianna Berry, Laurel 

Phelicia Berry, Leesburg, Va. 

Eduardo Beiancourt, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 

Barbara Betts, Meridian 

Faleshia Betts, Moss Point 

Tammi Bew, Grenada 

Janet Biglane, Laurel 

Melissa Bilbo, Laurel 

Wendy Bilbo, Laurel 

Michael Binder, New Orleans, La. 

Angela Bingham, Como 



Keith Bishop, Jackson 

Noel Black, Hattiesburg 

Tammy Black, Purvis 

Jane Blackledge, Laurel 

Brette Blackman, Canton 

Ashley Blackmon, Semmes, Ala. 

Anthony Blackwell, Hattiesburg 

Jason Blake, Milford, Conn. 

Sonya Blakely, Edwards 

Cecilia Blakeney, Laurel 

Ashley Blalock, Brandon 

Issac Blalock, Decatur 

Keith Blalock, Decatur 

Steven Blesse, Hattiesburg 

Charles Blue, Gautier 

Eli Bodden, San Pedro Sula, Honduras 

Rosa Bodden, San Pedro Sula, Honduras 

Racheal Bodie, Ocean Springs 

John Boepple, Slidell, La. 

Kathryn Boh, Bay St. Louis 

Joafre Bolden, Rosedale 

Barbara Bond, Pascagoula 

Stephanie Bond, Brandon 

Jessica Bones, Mobile 



270 People 





■^ (Left) Students planned and particip 

ed in many activities to promote ^riTut 

awareness. 

▼ (Below) This student wearyflie sticker 

bearing the message of M$gmo\ Awareness 

Week. 



Alcohol Awareness 



Eal. Drink, and be Merry— Responsibly 



^Ccfl^ 



Because of the seriousness of al- 
cohol and drug abuse in our nation 
today, students at the University 
of Southern Mississippi have 
formed the Alcohol Awaren 
Task Force to help address tMs is 
sue. Each year they sponsor Alco- 
hol Awareness Weejs^auring the 
third week of Octarber. The objec- 
tives of the welfare to inform and 



"It^time that we 
(s students take re- 
sponsibility for our 



•>•> 



actions. 

— KEN JEFCOAT 



educate people and to focus on 



functional alternatives and deci- 
sion-making processes. 

This past year USM's program 
was entered in the national compe- 
tition, competing against hundreds 
of other colleges and universities. 
The program was selected as one 
of the top five national award win- 
ners for the second time in three 
years. 



People 271 



Rhonda Bookout, Hattiesburg 

George Booth, Magee 

Maury Booth, Hattiesburg 

Shander Bouldin, Madison 

Kelly Bounds, Hattiesburg 

Kristi Bourne, Petal 

Jean Boutwell, Quitman 

Robert Boutwell, Stringer 

Sonya Boutwell, Stringer 

Monica Bowie, Clinton 

Terrance Bowie, Forest 

Bobby Bowlin, Jackson 

Shana Bowman, Brookhaven 

Marsorie Bowron, Jackson 

Carolyn Boyd, Petal 

Jan Boyd, Petal 

James Boyd, New Orleans, La. 

Patrick Boyd, Greenville 

John Boyer, Waveland 
Amanda Boykin, Jackson 

Valorie Boykin, Laurel 

Anna Bracero, Gulfport 

Wendy Bracey, Columbia 

Zoneice Bradford, Amory 

Christopher Bradley, Columbus 

Stacey Bradshaw, Clinton 

Jeffrey Brady, Ocean Springs 

Marti Brasher, Picayune 

Jerry Bray, Jackson 

Natalie Breland, Hattiesburg 



Jecyn Bremer, Brandon 

Amy Bridges, Silver Creek 

Darryl Bridges, Moss Point 

Jerilyn Bridges, Pascagoula 

Nancy Bridges, Picayune 

David Brister, McComb 

Derrell Britton, Greenville 

Barbi Broadus, Hattiesburg 

James Broadwater, Cleveland 

Tanya Broadway, Mize 

Delma Brooks, Lexington 

Marshella Broom, Gulfport 

Christopher Brouillette, Metairie, La. 

Tina Broussard, Baker, La. 

Andrea Brown, Biloxi 

Augusta Brown, Jackson 

Billy Brown, Prentiss 

Cleveland Brown, Clinton 

Cliff Brown, Jackson 

Connie Brown, Prentis 

Everette Brown, Hempstead, N. Y. 

Garrett Brown, Clarksdale 

Georgia Brown, Madison 

Jacqueline Brown, Biloxi 



272 People 





John L. Brown, Columbia 
John H. Brown, Clarksdale 
Joseph Brown, Bolton 
Jovanka Brown, Pascagoula 
Juanita Brown, Lumberton 
Laura Brown, Spanish Fort^Ala. 

Lori Brown, Jackson 
Ren Brown, Natchez 
Rene Brown, Ji^ttiesburg 
Riva Browp/picayune 
Steven Bfown, Mobile, Ala. 
TorjxfKa Brown, Greenville 

Wade Brown, Dixie Springs 

Willa Brown, Goodman 

Justina Browning, Ocean Springs 

Jennifer Bruce, Biloxi 

Aimee Brumfield, Bowling Green, Ky. 

Gary Brumfield, McComb 

Mary Brumfield, Foxworth 

Todd Buckley, Laurel 

Jeannie Buckner, Jackson 

Ray Buckner, Gulfport 

Laura Buhler, River Ridaef La. 

Elizabeth Bulland, Ma-rfdeville, La. 

LaMonica ButtoCk, Biloxi 
Lisa Bullodfr^Columbia 
Gina Bunfyn, Union 
Stace^ Buras, Columbia 
Ipa Burdine, Columbua 
lobert Burge, Kenner, La. 

Scott Burgess, Brandon 
David Burke, Pass Christian 
Charlie Burks, Biloxi 
Christopher Burks, Columbus 
Brigette Burlette, Marrero, La. 
Jay Burnell, Sarasota, Fla. 

Cenovia Burnes, Monticello 
Stephanie Burns, Vicksburg 
LaTonya Burnside, Benton 
John Burrell, Vicksburg 
Teresa Burrell, Pickens 
Lee Burril, Gulfport 

Susan Burt, Greenville 
Bryce Busche, Long Beach 
Amy Bush, Hattiesburg 
Tommi Bush, Laurel 
Sandra Butler, Carnes 
Kevin Byars, Magee 

Dawn Bynum, Clinton 
Lela Bynum, Laurel 
Jenean Byrd, Laurel 
Tandis Byrd, Long Beach 
Yulonda Byrd, Brookhaven 
David Byxbe, Hattiesburg 



People 273 



Ferris Byxbe, Hattiesburg 

Angela Calder, Brandon 

Lynn Calder, Magee 

Leonard Calhoone, Jackson 

Joseph Cameron, Jr., Jackson 

Julie Cameron, Hattiesburg 

Nancy Cameron, Hattiesburg 

Anthony Campbell, Chunky 

Janice Campbell, McComb 

Kimalon Campbell, Winstonville 

Rebecca Campbell, Jackson 

Tamanaca Campbell, Natchez 

Yolanda Campbell, Natchez 

Esther Cavabal, Gulfport 

Rafael Canabal, Columbia 

Laura Canada, Slidell, La. 

Susan Cangemi, Natchez 

Cleatonia Cannon, Greenville 

Hristian Carabulea, Romania, Constanta 

Joseph Carbery, Stony Creek, N. Y. 

Henry Carroll, McComb 

Lisa Carroll, Picayune 

Shannon Carson, Jackson 

Sharon Carson, Batesville 

Kelli Cartee, Gulfport 

Carla Carter, Pascagoula 

Catherine Carter, Laurel 

Christine Carter, Bay St. Louis 

LaFrance Carter, Jackson 

Sharon Carter, Canton 



Trena Carter, Philadelphia 

Virginia Cascio, Petal 

Vicki Caylor, Ocean Springs 

Heather Celoria, Lakeland 

Mona Chambers, Hillsboro 

Billy Chancellor, Buckatunna 

Kimberly Chancelor, Stonewall 

Carolyn Chapman, Laurel 

Johnny Chapman, Newton 

Christy Chappie, Slidell, La. 

Kwokfai Cheng, Hong Kong 

Pamela Cheung, Greenville 

Nita Chilton, Jackson 

Wayne Chisholm, McComb 

Eugene Christen III, Belle Chasse, La. 

Lori Christensen, Gulfport 

Gerald Christian, Vicksburg 

Horace Chui, Hong Kong 

Brett Clark, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Ella Clark, Port Gibson 

Helene Clark, Meridian 

Judith Clark, Houston, Tex. 

Kimberly Clark, Hattiesburg 

Lana Clark, Petal 



274 People 





Michelle Clark, Bailey 
Samuel Clark, Ellisville 
Shannon Clark, Hattiesburj, 
Sharon Clark, Sumral 
Tomeka Clark, Lorm*fn 
Vincent Clark, Mtfnticello 
Tamela Claybtffne, Meridian 

Kenneth^Tayton, Bay Springs 
Chri^if Clements, Forest 

:hael Cleveland, Slidell, La. 
)ana Clolinger, Petal 
Dale Coker, Braxton 
Stacy Coker, McComb 
Bethaney Coleman, Jackson 



■^ (Left) Even with a backpack there's^^ffl 
a lot to carry. 

▼ ( Below) The bookstore offen^K^ariety of 
backpacks for students. 




Back Packin&^artners 




Many students used it in ele- 
mentary school, but then in high 
school it was not cool. Well, it's 
now back on the backs of man] 
student. 

Back packs offer maptf advan- 
tages. For one thi*rg\ they are 
much more durable than arms, 
and they can^earry almost as much 
as a suitcase. Also, riding a bicycle 



"se my backsack 
or everything. I 
don't know what I 
would do without 
it." 

— SUSAN HILBUN 



to class has never been easier 
thanks to backpacks. 

With all the advantages back- 
packs offer, more and more back- 
packs will take the place of brief- 
cases and purses. 



/ 



People 275 



Leslie Coleman, Vicksburg 

Monica Coleman, Moss Point 

Sharon Coleman, Jackson 

Sherri Coleman, Louisville 

James Colgna, Ocean Springs 

Natalie Colle, Vancleave 

Scott Collins, Laurel 

Christopher Colomb, Chalmette, La. 

Caryn Comans, Brandon 

Gregory Cook, Hattiesburg 

Jocelyn Cook, Pascagoula 

Matt Cook, Jackson 

Tracey Cook, Hattiesburg 

Cajun Cool, New Orleans, La. 

Joseph Coole, Louisville 

Monica Cooley, Laurel 

Stephanie Cooley, Hattiesburg 

Wanda Cooley, Waynesboro 

April Cooper, Covington, La. 

Catherine Cooper, New Orleans, La. 

Sherri Cooper, Mobile, Ala. 

Subrina Cooper, Richton 

Valerie Corley, Hattiesburg 

Hope Corso, Biloxi 

Vanessa Cosby, Flora 

Tiernei Cosey, Hattiesburg 

Ludmila Cosio, Mexico City, Mexico 

Deborah Cothern, McComb 

Julie Cottrell, Mobile, Ala. 

Missy Covington, Jackson 

Beverly Cowan, Holly Springs 

Venscent Cowann, Pascagoula 

Jennifer Cowart, Bush, La. 

Thomas Conerly, Long Beach 

Deandrea Cox, Florence 

Kayla Cox, Vicksburg 

Rob Cox, Cleveland 

Stacey Craft, Wiesbaden, West Germany 

Buddy Crawford, Jackson 

Christy Crawford, Mt. Hermon, La. 

Tracey Crawford, Magee 

Kena Creel, Biloxi 




Tynia Crews, New Orleans, La. 

Kimberly Crook, Jackson 

Ava Crosby, Moss Point 

Christie Crosby, Bogue Chitto 

Timothy Crotwell, Morton 

Lucious Crowe II, Greenwood 

Del Crum, Hattiesburg 

Richard Cudd, Jr., Picayune 

Darryl Cuevas, Gulfport 

Lori Cuevas, Gulfport 

Stephanie Cummings, Jackson 

Jennifer Cunningham, Pear 



fl A A 




276 People 





fe§£*£#M 





,' \i I. ! 



«ai 



Y 




•^ (Left) Students are viewiwTthe boards 
where the pictures of the^fccauties are dis- 
played. 

▼ (Below) StudenKgo to the polls to elect 
USM's Beautip/Tor the year. 



People's Cbmce 



The student body is involved in 
the election of ASB executive of- 
fices, the Student Senate, Home- 
coming Court, Campus Beauties 
and Mr. and Mrs. USM. Electic 
are publicized to the cajrfpus 
through the advertisement of nu- 
merous campaign posters and ban- 
ners pasted on the^4ub. Commons 
and library waHs. The elections are 
held in the^tJnion, and all students 
may pa-rucipate. The election com- 
missioner is in charge of all ASB 
fections and is overseen by the At- 
torney General. Angela Beam was 
the 1989-90 Election Commission- 
er and had the job of organizing 
poll workers, counting all ballots, 



posting ne^ults, hearing appeals 
and ensuring that all elections 
wprein compliance with the ASB 
'election code. 

"I found the elec- 
tions very colorful 
and exciting. This 
is my first year 
here, and it's a big 
change from high 
school." 

— SHELIA HILTON 




People 277 



Bryan Cupit, Natchez 

Karen Currie, Utica 

Jesse Curry, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Sheri Curry, Gulf Breeze, Fla. 

Sonya Curry, Jackson 

Claudia Curtis, Columbia 

Joseph Curtiss, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Roxanne Dagino, Magnolia 

Keri Dahl, Ocean Springs 

Gretchen Daigle, Gretna, La. 

Keith Dale, Picayune 

Selena Dalton, Brookhaven 

Laura Daman, Bay St. Louis 

Ashley Daniel, League City, Texas 

Dessie Daniel, Brookhaven 

Heather Daniel, Vicksburg 

Gary Daniels, Prentiss 

Keith Dannewitz, Harvey 

Dawn Darby, Vicksburg 

Celena Darden, Rosedale 

Kurt Dau, Bettendorf, Iowa 

Shelley Daughdrill, Brandon 

Mary Davenport, Jackson 

Diane Davidson, Hattiesburg 

Alison Davis, Poplarville 

Angel Davis, Yazoo City 

Billie Davis, Stringer 

DeAnna Davis, Pascagoula 

Deanna Davis, St. Louis, Mo. 

Frances Davis, Beaumont 

Linda Davis, McNeill 

Lisa Davis, Jackson 

Natalie Davis, Columbus 

Rachel Davis, Hattiesburg 

Ron Davis, Shannon 

Sara Davis, Columbia 

Shajuanda Davis, Belzoni 

Sheila Davis, Collins 

Tonya Davis, Collinsville 

Veronica Davis, Belzoni 

Kimberly Davison, Meridian 

Laura Day, Hattiesburg 

Kim Deal, Hattiesburg 

Darlene Dean, Laurel 

Jeremy Dearman, Hattiesburg 

Sharon DeBerry, Holly Springs 

Eldridge Dedeaux, Pass Christian 

Roslyn Dedeaux, Pass Christian 

Valencia Dedeaux, Pass Christian 

Angela Deer, McComb 

Jennifer Dejean, Pascagoula 

Donna Delmas, Pascagoula 

Susan Delmas, Richland 

Marcy DeMany, Slidell, La. 



278 People 





Thomas DcMoss, Crystal Springs 
Mary Denton, Church Hill 
Jennifer Dewalt, Covington, La. 
Dennis Dickerson, Union 
Rebecca Dickenson, Long Beach, 
Siren Dillon, Moss Point 

Jennifer Driden, Greenwood 
Andrea Dittmar, L#g1e Rock, Mo. 
Gregory Divinity; Utica 
Angela Dixortf Jackson 
Sally Dntdn, Summerdale, Ala. 
Sand.pfl Dixon, Hattiesburg 

Jaomi Dobson, Jackson 
Dana Dockens, Hazelhurst 
Brian Dodd, Memphis, Tenn. 
Tracy Doebler, Pascagoula 
Denise Dokey, New Orleans, La. 
Gino Dollars, Hattiesburg 

Tina Dollars, Hattiesburg 

Hector Dominguez, La Lima, Hondu; 

Melissa Donald, Picayune 

Johnny Donaldson, Prentiss 

Angela Donley, Greenwoof 

Traci Doody, Slidell, Lj 

Daniel Dorion, Rary" St. Louis 
Amy Dorr, Pkayune 
Jett Dorset! Lucedale 
Lisa Defrtch, Columbus 

fvl Doss, Gulfport 
fandra Dotson, Brandon 

Cecilia Douglass, Lumberton 
Ada Downing, Jackson 
Tiffany Downs, Mandeville, La. 
Lisa Drake, Brandon 
Ruth Drake, Jackson 
Tara Dreher, Brandon 

Angela Drummond, Mendenhall 
Stephanie DuBose, Hattiesburg 
Alan Dubuisson, Long Beach 
Karen Duffie, Slidell, La. 
Sonja Dufrene, Galliano, La. 
Julie Duggan, Biloxi 

Jerry Dukes, Forest 

Sean Dunaway, Jackson 

Yolanda Dunbar, New Orleans, La. 

Christina Duncan, Vicksburg 

Clinton Duncan, Purvis 

James Duncan III, Hattiesburg 

Tunjia Duncan, Hattiesburg 
Steven Dunn, Gulfport 
Jennifer Dupont, Gulfport 
Michael Dupuy, Gonzales, La. 
Nathaniel Dyer. Cleveland 
Michelle Eagle, Meridian 



People 279 



Kristie Easterling, Petal 

Rebecca Edens, Long Beach 

Sojnya Edmonds, Gautier 

Yolanda Egland, Gulfport 

Steven Eick, Ocean Springs 

Stephanie Eiland, Clinton 

Vince Elchos, Hattiesburg 

Cherlyn Elliot, Richton 

Jessica Ellis, Gulfport 

Heidi Eisler, Picayune 

Mark Ellis, Natchez 

Denise Epps, Vicksburg 

Nancy Eshenbaugh, Petal 

Shellye Espey, Meridian 

Jeffery Etheridge, McComb 

Carl Evans, Andrea 

Howard Evans, Hattiesburg 

Kim Evans, Metairie 

Kristin Evans, Metairie 

Mable Evans, Laurel 

Sheila Evans, Moss Point 

Tracey Evans, Port Gibson 

Kerrie Everett, Natchez 

Pamela Everett, Hattiesburg 

Stephanie Ewing, Bay St. Louis 

Lisa Ezell, Petal 

Colleen Fabacher, River Ridge, La. 

Tonyia Fairley, Hattiesburg 

Chantal Famularo, New Orleans, La. 

Chris Farish, Hattiesburg 



Kim Farmer, Clinton 

Stephen Farmer, Slidell, La. 

John Faught, Lithia, Fla. 

Laurie Felder, McComb 

Cassandra Felton, Marigold 

Mary Fenech, Laurel 

Vicki Fennell, Petal 

Kirk Fenton, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

James Fenton, Northport, Ala. 

Priscilla Ferguson, Starkville 

Edna Fernandez, Gulfport 

Kimberly Firley, Hattiesburg 

Angela Fisher, Utica 
Belinda Fisher, Utica 

Bradley Fisher, Dallas, Texas 
Martin Fitts, Myrtle 

Bradley Fitzgerald, McComb 
Larry Flowers, Terry 

Adrian Floyd, Columbus 

Angela Floyd, Magee 

Shannan Floyd, Quitman 

Wendy Floyd, Morton 

Lori Flynt, Hattiesburg 

James Folks, Mt. Hermon, La. 



280 People 





Splish Splash 



No matter what the weather is 
like, it is always nice to be able to 
go to the natatorium for a quick 
dip. Thanks to recent renovations, 
that dream is now more of a reaU 
ty. Workers spent the better^rart 
of the winter months preparing the 
natatorium for the pre-^pring fever 
that all students stfffer. So now 
when the urge/hits, students can 
hit the pooJ/So the next time you 
are hot^rfnd cold all at the same 
tim^frying going for a swim at the 

ftatorium. Some days it even 
beats the beach. ■ By Vince Clark 



"Onp/bf the few 
wftxs I enjoy exer- 
cising is swimming 
at the Natatori- 



um. 



» 



RACHEL DRISKELL 




^ (Left) At Delta Gamma's Anchor 

Splash some of the events, such as this 

were quite interesting. 

▼ (Below) Many attended the gr^<fcJ open 

ing of the natatorium dupmg Anchor 

Splash. 



People 281 



Roger Folse, Luling, La. 

Amy Ford, Vicksburg 

Daniel Ford, Jackson 

Dannette Ford, Jackson 

Michael Ford, Amory 

Shank Ford, Batesville 

Teresa Ford, Louisville 

Elizabeth Forehand, Stapleton, Ala. 

Conni Forte, Mandeville, La. 

Sheila Fortenberry, Angie, La. 

Angelia Foster, Brookhaven 

Susan Foster, Laurel 

Bernita Fountain, Holly Springs 

Donna Fox, Baton Rouge, La. 

Leslie Fox, Greenville 

Natalie Fox, Lecanto, Fla. 

Juan Franco, Cali, Colombia 

Cynthia Franklin, Hattiesburg 

Lajoyce Franklin, Sardis 

Tayna Franklin, Meridian 

Jasmene Frazier, Jackson 

William Frazier, Meridian 

Tracie Freed, Ocean Springs 

Angela Freeman, Gulfport 

Shannon Freeman, Petal 

Angela Freibert, Jackson 

Michael French, Hattiesburg 

Troy Frisbie, Ocean Springs 

Hillary Fry, New Orleans, La. 

Yvonne Fry, Plant City, Fla. 



Holly Fulton, Jackson 

Laura Furman, Camden, Ala. 

Mercedes Gabourel, Slidell, La. 

Stephanie Gale, DeKalb, Miss. 

Tricia Gale, Pensacola, Fla. 

Judith Gallegos, Vallparaiso, Fla. 

Karen Gaylon, Terry 

Danny Games, Brookhaven 

Carolyn Gandy, Starkville 

Christi Gandy, Quitman 

Christy Gandy, Moss Point 

Cindy Gandy, Moss Point 

Ann Garanich, Slidell, La. 

Lisa Gardiner, DTberville 

Jennifer Gardner, Hattiesburg 

Lorri Gardner, Columbia 

Gregory Garner, Vicksburg 

Jennifer Garner, Hattiesburg 

Latouisha Gasaway, Tupelo 

Heather Gaskin, Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 

David Gatlin, Waynesboro 

Tonya Gee, Natchez 

Sean George, Baton Rouge, La. 

Patricia Gerald, New Augusta 



282 People 




^ (Left) A Velvet Elvis guitarist^Crforms 
a number during the UAC cprlcert 
▼ (Below) The rock band/gave students a 
night of rock entertainment. 



fck 



Bad English/delivers 
good entertainment 



In a world where most rock staj 
are egomaniacs, Bad EngUsfi is 
one group of guys that stffl have 
their heads screwed ojKstraight — 
they deliver a solid^show and they 
care about their fans. 

GuitarisJ/Neal Schon, vocalist 
John Wrfite, keyboardist Jonathan 
Caiir; bassist Ricky Phillips and 
rummer Dean Castronovo gave 
the 1 ,000 plus crowd of students 80 
minutes of driving rock. The band 
ran through all four of its singles as 



99 



"The concert was 
really wonderful. I 
had a great time. 

— JAN KNIGHT 



well as other tracks from its debut 
album. 

Students rocked a Tuesday 
night away thanks to this UAC 
sponsored event. 



People 283 



Michael German II, Washington, D.C. 

Imad Ghoussoub, Beit-Chabab/HEA, Lebanon 

Cynthia Gibson, Philadelphia 

Anthony Giegler, Gulfport 

Kimberly Gilbert, Franklinton, La. 

Jennifer Giles, Olive Branch 

Tracey Giles, Greenville 

Patrick Gill, Bettendorf, Iowa 

Ryan Gilner, Gulfport 

Kimberly Givens, Bogue Chitto 

John Glass, Mobile, Ala. 

Alicia Glover, Hattiesburg 

Almetrius Goff, Gulfport 

Christy Goff, Vancleave 

Joel Goff, Vancleave 

Ima Goober, Birmingham, Ala. 

Uri Goober, Gulfport 

Jeremy Gooden, Jackson 

Libby Goodwin, Jackson 

Lisa Goodwin, Brookhaven 

Ameena Gordon, Oxford 

Corey Gordon, Natchez 

Matt Gordon, Clinton 

Preston Gordon, Summit 

Terri Gordon, Meridian 

Tricia Gore, Hattiesburg 

Jean Gouzy, Slidell, La. 

Missy Gowen, Hattiesburg 

Felicia Graham, Carthage 

Jodie Graham, Houma, La. 

Tina Graham, Mobile, Ala. 

Nina Grafton, Jackson 

Lisa Grant, Greenwood 

Carolyn Graves, Hattiesburg 

Latrina Graves, Moss Point 

Misty Graves, Franklinton, La. 

Calvin Gray, Natchez 

Christi Gray, Florence 

Eleasha Gray, Lake 

Jeffery Gray, Slidell, La. 

Jonathan Gray, Mobile, Ala. 

Kim Gray, Natchez 

Michelle Gray, Philadelphia 

Regell Gray, Philadelphia 

Wanda Gray, Jackson 

David Green, Crystal Springs 

Genny Green, Gautier 

Janice Green, Crystal Springs 

Tisha Green, Columbia 

Vernon Green Jr., Clarksdale 

Jennifer Greer, Brookhaven 

Zenja Greer, Moss Point 

Kim Gregoire, Brookhaven 

Jeannine Gremillion, Covington, La. 




284 People 







Hollie Grey, New Orleans, La. 
Aldoria Griffin, Batesville 
Dawnis Griffin, lndianola 
LaVada Griffin, Batesville 
Shana Griffin, Gulfport 
Victoria Griffin, Natchez 

Judith Griffis, Long Beaj, 
Sandra Griffiths, Pul^ki 
Valeria Grim, Florence 
Ortie Grinnell JoauUcr 
Laura Gruru^ Laurel 
Holly GoWert, Franklinton, La. 

Au*frey Gully, Laurel 

Guillot, Slidell, La. 
Jennifer Guin, Carriere 
Julie Guintard, Lafayette, La. 
Ava Gunn, Carnes 
Miki Guthrie, Panama City, Fla. 

Marlene Gutierrez, Argentina 
Timothy Haas, Denham Springs, La. 
Melissa Haddad, Brandon 
Joseph Haddon III, Grenanda 
Paul Hagelston, Hattiesburg 
Chevelle Hall, Louisville 

Deron Hall, Bassfield, 
Regina Hall, Yazr^rXity 
Sherri Hall, Ja 
Stacey HallyBassfield 
Terri Ha^ Jackson 
Vincerj* Hall, Gulfport 

filda Ham, Smithdale 
Keyla Hamilton, Mendenhall 
Leah Hamilton, Hurley 
Lori Hamilton, Mendenhall 
Tonya Hamilton, McComb 
Patricia Hammett, Gulfport 

Joel Hammond, Brookhaven 

Lesa Hammond, Jackson 

Michelle Hammond, New Orleans, La. 

Rick Hammond, Metairie, La. 

Shandi Hammond, Biloxi 

Velecia Hampton, Anguilla 

Kelley Hanley, Long Beach 
Kathryn Hanson, Slidell, La. 
Leigh Harber, Yazoo City 
Elizabeth Harding, lndianola 
Eric Hardy, Laurel 
Rachon Hardy, Mobile, Ala. 

Joe Hargett, Brookhaven 
Jerry Hankleroad, Derby, Ks. 
George Harne, Atlanta, Ga. 
Veronica Harper, Crystal Springs 
Joey Harrington, Petal 
Andrea Harris, Greenville 




People 285 



Deanna Harris, Pascagoula 

Dionne Harris, Natchez 

Felicia Harris, Louise 

Karen Harris, Indianola 

Katrina Harris, Jackson 

Kristy Harris, Bogalusa, La. 

Charla Harrison, Meridian 

Chett Harrison, Wiggins 

Lori Harrison, Laurel 

Marvin Hart, Terry 

Roderick Hart, Jackson 

Diane Hartzler, Meridian 

Robin Hartzog, Silver Creek 

Sandra Harworth, Meridian 

Kathy Haskew, Claiborne, Ala. 

David Hastings, Leland 

Steven Hastings, Detroit, Mich. 

Eric Hatcher, Alexandria, La. 

Beth Hawkins, Wesson 

Julie Hawkins, Madison 

Harriet Hawthorne, Jackson 

Tammie Hayes, State Line 

Deanne Haynes, Montgomery, Ala. 

John Hazelton, Sylvarena 

Katherine Heard, Jackson 

Stacy Heard, Long Beach 

Gary Hebler, Vicksburg 

Susan Heiden, Jackson 

Vangi Hein, Natchez 

Staronia Heisser, McComb 

Michelle Hellard, Jackson 

Stacey Hellen, Moselle 

Scott Hemeter, Waynesboro 

Carol Hemphill, Columbia 

Jennifer Henderson, Slidell, La. 

Wanda Henderson, Natchez 

Blythe Hennessey, New Orleans, La. 

James Hennessey, Slidell, La. 

Twyla Henry, Port Gibson 

Beverly Henshaw, Gautier 

Paul Hernandez, Biloxi 

Brian Herrington, Pascagoula 

Lisa Herrington, Laurel 

Stephanie Herrington, Magee 

Peter Hesketh, Bellevue, Wash. 

Heidi Hester, Pearlington 

Lara Heyliger, Biloxi 

Fredrick Hickmon, Louisville 

Carol High, Hattiesburg 

Barton Hill, Gulfport 

Geneann Hill, Poplarville 

Javannah Hill, Monticello 

Jeffery Hill, Hattiesburg 

Joycelyn Hill, Lexington 




286 People 





o f p a 




•^ (Left) It's a wet walk to class for Jjrese 

students. 

▼ (Below) Neither rain, slee^nor snow 

can prevent this student frpin being on the 



Rain, Rain, Ge^Away 








One of the problems of being a 
student at USM is trying to get 
from point A to point B without an 
umbrella. Of course some students,, 
have umbrellas, but then again 
there are all of those famou^-USM 
water puddles awaitina/fne unsu- 
spected plunge. It doesn't always 
deter students, btftit seems easy to 
"just miss tb4t class" if it's in the 
CBA ana you have to get there 
anhellenic. So when it rains, 
out the umbrella and make 
the best of it: Go to class. 



"I >fiink classes 
lould be dismissed 
on rainy days." — 

ANN TULLOS 



fro 



real' 



People 287 



Lisa Hill, Mandeville, La. 

Charles Hillman, Jackson 

Claxton Hilton, Hattiesburg 

Kelvin Hinton, Richton 

Migai Hinton, Compton 

Sharon Hinton, Brandon 

Karen Hinton, Brandon 

Elizabeth Hipshier, Jackson 

Pamela Hobbs, Mendenhall 

Stacey Hobgood, Picayune 

Heidi Hodson, Carthage 

Tommy Hoffman, Ridgeland 

Tracy Hoffmann, New Orleans, La. 

Michael Hogan, Petal 

Michelle Holden, Bogalusa, La. 

Melissa Holder, Gulfport 

Pamela Hollensbe, Picayune 

Kimberly Hollingsworth, Laurel 

Jennifer Holman, Pearl 

Viktor Holmberg, Vicksburg 

Lynn Holmes III, Hattiesburg 

Eric Hook, Ocean Springs 

Holly Hook, Ocean Springs 

Kimberly Hooper, Mound Bayou 

Melissa Hooper, Lafayette, La. 

Andrea Hopkins, Sayville, N.Y. 

Paula Horath, Sondheimer, La. 

Tommie Hosey, Bay Springs 

Bill Hough, Mobile, Ala. 

Jo Anne Howard, Meridian 



288 People 




Kasey Howard, Meridian 

LaCurga Howard, Gulfport 

Laura Howard, Poplarville 

Raquel Howard, Moss Point 

Vicki Howat, Biloxi 

Justine Howe, Orange Park, Fla. 

Cathy Howell, Lucedale 

Mechelle Howell, Laurel 

Sharon Howell, Hattiesburg 

Susan Howell, Jackson 

Theresa Hoyt, Metairie, La. 

Anna Huang, Penang, Malaysia 

Sophia Huang, Penang, Malaysia 

Edward Huddleston, Jackson 

Deborah Hudson, Sumra 

Katherine Hudson, Saucier 

Mona Hudson, Hattiesburg 

Brooke Huey, Moss Point 

Bo Huffman, Brookhaven 

David Huffman, Vicksburg 

Mark Hugel, New Orleans, La. 

Pamela Hughes, Jackson 

Daphne Hull, Jackson 

Natasha Hunt, Natchez 




Carl Hunter, Hattiesburg 

Kimbcrly Hunter, Pearl 

Michael Hunter, Hattiesburi 

Rosalind Hunter, Hattiesjarurg 

Snahadat Hussain, Dh^fka, Bangladesh 

Troy Hust, Jacksoj 

Freda Hutcher^on, Buckatunna 

Yolanda Rutchins, Indianola 
Shana/Hutto, Waynesboro 
Ar>gela Hyde, Pearl River, La. 
len Ice, New Orleans, La. 
Geoffrey Ireland, Louisville 
Debora Irwin, Gautier 
Rhonda Isaac, McComb 




^ (Left) Trudy Calhoun relaxes as 

donates blood for a worthy cause. 

T (Below) Another USM student partici 

pates in the many blood drivsa'ridd on cam 

pus. 



Pins andNe^dles 




USM was again the site for 
blood donations. The object was to 
include students in giving blood 
and to interest them in continuing 
to give for the rest of their liv* 

Many students were at fira ap- 
prehensive about the ideerof giving 
a pint of their blood Jjfut some were 
actually more aj>aid of the needle. 
In order to gi^e blood, the student 
had to be/aT least 1 7 years old and 
weigMriore than 110 pounds. Be- 
fore donating each student had to 



"I/always donated 
ood during a 
campus blood drive 
because I think it's 
for a good cause." 



BEN GRAY 



answer a questionnaire and have 
their blood tested for anemia. 



Then, the student faced the dread- 
ed needle and about 10 minutes of 
agony while their blood slowly 
filled the bag. The blood donated 
was used around the state and the 
country for those in need. 

USM students were proud that 
they cared enough to attempt to 
help solve a national problem by- 
donating a small replaceable part 
of themselves. | | By Lorna 
Freeman 



People 289 



Suzi Isely, Saucier 

Chip Ivey, Brookhaven 

Jennifer Jack, Slidell, La. 

Carl Jackson, Poplarville 

Linda Jackson, Edwards 

Monica Jackson, Gulfport 

Becky Jackson, Picayune 

Sonja Jackson, Bassfield 

Stacy Jackson, Forest 

William Jackson, Pearl 

John Jacobs, Elba, Ala. 

Anita Jacobs, Gulfport 

Deborah James, Brookhaven 

Dexter James, Indianola 

Doy James, Baton Rouge, La. 

Gwendolyn James, Shaw 

Jaquatte James, Aberdeen 

Julianna James, Piano, Texas 

David Jranagin, Corinth 
Jean Jarrell, Purvis 
Tery Jarrell, Lumberton 
Don Jefcoat, Soso 
Janice Jeffery, Madison 
Donald Jenkins, Jackson 

Kawanna Jenkins, Jackson 

Stan Jenkins, Pearl 

William Jenkins, McComb 

Susanne Jensen, Moss Point 

Michelle Jerome, Hattiesburg 

Rachel Jerome, Hattiesburg 

Felicia Jimerson, Biloxi 

Corey Johns, McComb 

Adrienne Johnson, Columbia 

Amy Johnson, Slidell, La. 

Angela Johnson, Pascagoula 

Aubrey Johnson, Newnan, Ga. 

Byron Johnson, Jackson 
Cornelia Johnson, Hattiesburg 

Chip Johnson, McNeill 

Evelyn Johnson, Oxford 
Felicia Johnson, Pass Christian 

Guy Johnson, Meridian 

Jacqueline Johnson, McComb 

Jennifer Johnson, Vicksburg 

Jerry Johnson, Gulfport 

John Johnson, Corinth 

Judith Johnson, Hattiesburg 

Kimberly Johnson, Lumberton 

LaGrena Johnson, Moss Point 

Michael Johnson, Moss Point 

Monica Johnson, Wiggins 

Pamela Johnson, Natchez 

Patina Johnson, Greenville 

Patrina Johnson, Louin 



290 People 









Retina Johnson, Jackson 
Rhoma Johnson, Greenville 
Robert Johnson, Lake 
Robert Johnson, Vicksburg 
Sharon Johnson, Wiggins 
Terri Johnson, Columbia 

Tonya Johnson, Brookha\ 
Vanessa Johnson, Wiggins 
Donald Johnson, Brandon 
Adriane Jonev-Biloxi 
Amy Jones/Richland 
Beverlyxfones, Buckatunna 

larles Jones, Natchez 
Christopher Jones, Gulf Breeze, Ala. 
Freddie Jones, Jackson 
Gene Jones, Sumner 
Gregory Jones, Biloxi 
Judy Jones, Biloxi 

Kimberly Jones, Marks 
Lajuan Jones, Florence, Ala. 
Linda Jones, Pearl 
Marcia Jones, Jackson 
Pattie Jones, Taylorsville 
Rhonda Jones, Hickory 

Scott Jones, PearL 
Ventez Jones^Memphis 
Alice Joseph India 
Shary^Joy, Clinton 
Twytfa Joyner, Mobile, Ala. 
man Kalzmarek, Waukesha, Wise. 

Joseph Kakaveka, Stone Mountain, Ga. 

Skipper Kalil, Gulfport 

Robert Kalka, Magee 

Karen Kane, Hattiesburg 

Jon Kaufman, Goshen, Ind. 

Lisa Kazelskis, Richmond, Va. 

Rickey Keith, Magee 
Stephanie Keith, Magee 
Barbara Kelley, Meridian 
Joy Kelley, Laurel 
Angela Kelly, Pinola 
Clarissa Kelly, Monticello 

Theresa Kelly, Gulfport 
La Wanda Kennebrew, Jackson 
Michael Kennedy, Bay St. Louis 
Stephanie Kennedy, Petal 
William Kennedy, Petal 
Karen Kerr, Slidell, La. 

Michelle Kerstine, Natchez 
Robbie Kesler, Natchez 
Kenenth Keys, Clarksdale 
Randy Khalaf, Jackson 
John Kinberg, Gulfport 
Shalandria Kincaid, Chicago, 111. 




People 291 



Burman King III, Carthage 

Janice King, Natchez 

Phalesha King, Batesville 

Valarie King, Brookhaven 

Kerri Kingston, Bay St. Louis 

Kristine Kinna, Picayune 

Keisha Kirkland, Jackson 

Michael Kirkland, Philadelphia 

Stacey Kirkland, Quitman 

Charles Kirkland, Hattiesburg 

Jonathan Kittrell, Hattiesburg 

Kristin Klusendorf, Long Beach 

Havon Knight, Taylorsville 

Heather Knight, Baton Rouge, La. 

Tamela Knight, Hattiesburg 

Susan Knoess, Mandeville, La. 

Kathryn Koeppel, Hattiesburg 

Lisa Kokinda, Hattiesburg 

Audrea Kool-Aid, Hattiesburg 

Charlene Kool-Aid, Hattiesburg 

Sharon Kool-Aid, Hattiesburg 

Michele Korczak, New Orleans, La. 

David Kostmayer, Biloxi 

Sasaki Kotomo, Japan 

Marian Krishack, Biloxi 

Eulema Kuhlmann, Hattiesburg 

Rebecca Kullmer, Shamrock, Texas 

Conti Kung, Hong Kong 

Justin Kuykendall, Jackson 

Georgianna Kwan, Moorhead 



Kermit Kwan, Moorhead 

Jennifer Lackey, Forest 

Kirby Lackey, Petal 

Carolyn LaCroix, Biloxi 

Desiree Ladner, Bay St. Louis 

James Lambert, Brookhaven 

Laliece Lambert, Mound Bayou 
Elena LaNasa, Waveland 



Sandy Lancaster, Lucedale 
Erin Landry, Baton Rouge, La. 



292 People 





tudies 



•^ (Left) Students take a moment to pose 
while taking in the sites. 

▼ (Far left) Students in a fashion 
chandising class enjoy looking at exfubits 
displayed at the Museum of Lo/raon. 

▼ (Below) The British SUKfies Program 
gives students the oppapfunity to see the 
sites of London and J-He surrounding areas. 




USM's educational opportuni- 
ties are by no means limited to its 
Hattiesburg campus. Each year 
the Center for International Ed 
cation's Office of International 
Programs offers an array of'study- 
abroad programs. SUidents and 
faculty are invited (^participate in 
summer semesters abroad pro- 
grams in England, Austria, Mexi- 

' co, Jarn^-rca, Canada, France and 
Jap; 

'erhaps the most widely ac- 

'claimed of all is the British Studies 
Program. One of the nation's larg- 
est university sponsored programs, 
it offers participants an opportuni- 
ty to gain a better understanding 



D **rticipating in 
British Studies 
Program was the 
highlight of my 
studies at USM." 

— TAMMY PETRO 

of Anglo-American culture via 
scholastic and cultural events. 

During their three or five week 
stay in London, students are re- 
quired to take six semester hours. 
Class activities include lectures 
and many extra-curricular activi- 



ties, in addition to supervised re- 
search. 

Beyond the classroom, the pro- 
gram's participants are encour- 
aged to take part in the many cul- 
tural events offered. They may 
take day tours of Cambridge, Do- 
ver, Canterbury, Stratford or Ox- 
ford, to name a few. Five-day trips 
to Scotland also are available. 

The British Studies Program, as 
well as the many other internation- 
al programs offered by the Center 
for International Education, pre- 
sent students and faculty with the 
opportunity to "broaden their ho- 
rizons." 



People 293 



Veronica Landry, Hattiesburg 

Lisa Lang, Magnolia 

Mark Lang, McComb 

Melody Lang, Charlotte, N.C. 

Tisha Lang, Biloxi 

Shelly Langley, Taylorsville 

Jeffrey Lansing, Baton Rouge, La. 

Yolanda Larry, Jackson 

Sharon Lanson, Magnolia 

Phillip Lea, Brookhaven 

Danna Leard, Natchez 

Ann Leaumont, Harahan, La. 

Debbie LeBlanc, River Ridge, La. 

Kathryn Lecky, Mobile, Ala. 

Patty LeCompte, Houma, La. 

LaLisa Ledlow, Tupelo 

Catherine Lee, Hattiesburg 

Dumpi Lee, Gulfport 

Janice Lee, Ocean Springs 

Jennifer Lee, Greenville 

Paula Lee, Columbus 

Tony Lee, Kilmichael 

Jeanette Lefler, Jackson 

Victoria Leggett, Brookhaven 

Dennis LeNoir, Wiggins 

Lisa Leonard, Ocean Springs 

Melanie Lester, Hattiesburg 

Tobie Letlow, Moss Point 

Donna Lett, Moss Point 

Farris Lewis, Holly Springs 

Kellee Lewis, Laurel 

Simone Lewis, Prentiss 

Daniel Ligas, Hattiesburg 

Marketta Liggins, Byhalia 

Linda Lilly, Brookhaven 

Alfreda Lindsey, Hattiesburg 

Becky Lindsey, Hattiesburg 

Sherry Lister, McLain 

Sandra Littell, Sebring, Fla. 

Catherine Little, Pascagoula 

Kimberly Little, Mize 

Sherry Little, Niceville, Fla. 

Walter Littleton, Vicksburg 

Cindy Livingston, Pearl 

Keith Locke, Mobile, Ala. 

Denesia Lofton, Greenwood 

Karin Lofton, Jackson 

Steven Lofton, Clinton 

Madeleine Loftus, Long Beach 

Dana Logue, Vicksburg 

David Long, Jackson 

Silenda Longino, Monticello 

Lei Lord, Madison 

Steven Loughlin, Gulfport 



294 People 





f* 




Papa LoungcLac, Lake Charles, La. 

Juliet Lovell, Clarksdale 

John Lovett, Morton 

Amber Lowe, Long Beach 

James Lowe, Jackson 

Scott Lowenberg, Bettendorf, lq>* 

Kar Lubnow, Pensacola, 
Barbara Lucas, Aberdeen 
Joyce Lucas, Aberdeen 
Sheila Lusher^mdependence 
Erin Luskj^Mew Orleans, La. 
Mary Ltrfton, Vicksburg 

telissa Lyon, Shaw 
Darla Lyons, Gautier 
Mark Lytle, Hattiesburg 
Michelle MacKay, Mandeville, La. 
Karen Mackey, Gretna, La. 
Denise Macko, Brandon 

Mark Maddox, Jackson 
Alisa Madison, Monticello 
Charlie Magee, Picayune 
Elissa Magee, Franklinton, La. 
Geoffery Magee, Chicago, I1J 
Novie Magee, Bogalusa, 

Willie Magee IIIj2ollins 
Margaret Mah^dy, Hahnville, La. 
Carl MajoiyBay St. Louis 
Leigh Mdfone, Hattiesburg 
Nanpy Malone, Meridian 
fonda Malone, Meridian 

Billie Malsbury, Brookhaven 
Melissa Manby, Vicksburg 
Leigh Manly, Long Beach 
Donna Manning, Hurley 
Robert Manning, Long Beach 
Krystal Mansfield, Perkinston 

Earnest Manuel Jr., Jackson 
Jacquelyn Mapp, Columbus 
Randi Marchand, Gonzales, La. 
Joseph Mardis, Grenada 
Sarita Mark, Tylertown 
Donald Marshall, Long Beach 

Elaine Marston, Mobile, Ala. 
Mary Martello, Jackson 
Aidra Martin, Jackson 
Billy Martin, Purvis 
Charles Martin, Slidell, La. 
Jody Martin, Bogue Chitto 

Pamela Martin, Greenville 
Patty Martin, Hattiesburg 
Jolene Martinez, New Orleans, La. 
Susan Massengale, Slidell. La. 
Constance Massey, Pearl 
Mark Mathis, Carriere 



People 295 



Mary Matthews, Jackson 

James Maxell, Long Beach 

Marsha Maxey, Philadelphia 

Shannon Maxie, Hattiesburg 

James May, Petal 

Cornelius Mayfield, Waynesboro 

Margaret Maziarz, Clinton 

Bambi McBrayer, Louisville 

Michelle McCall, Hattiesburg 

Sean McCarthy, Pensacola, Fla. 

Lisa McCarty, Shubuta 

Kevin McCaskey, Waynesboro 

Traci McCaskill, Clarksdale 

Vincent McCaskill, Kokomo 

Tanya McClellan, Gulfport 

Ramona McCollum, Saucier 

Rich McCord, Niceville, Fla. 

Theda McCrory, Greenville 

Valisa McCrory, Moss Point 

Lan McCulloch, Slidell, La. 

Lillie McCullum, Ellisville 

Shasta McCurdy, Bay Springs 

Jana McDaniel, Gulfport 

Willie McDey, Newnan, Ga. 

Kevin McDonald, Jackson 

Roger McDonald, Hattiesburg 

Susan McDonald, Collins 

Reuben McDowell, Columbia 

Lynn McDown, Biloxi 

Michelle McElroy, Jackson 



LaSandra McFarland, Meridian 

Vivian McFarland, West Point 

Gary McGhee, McComb 

James McGhee, Jackson 

Mary McGee, Meridian 

Sean McGee, New Orleans 

Jennifer McGlothlin, Franklinton 

Joan McGrew, Picayune 

Kelvin McGruder, Enterprise 

Valerie McGuire, Natchez 

William Mclntire, Calhan 

Mary McKay, Pass Christian 

Rebecca McKay, Hattiesburg 

Shownie McKay, Hattiesburg 

Brian McKee, Pearl 

Heather McKee, Brandon 

Sharlet McKennis, McComb 

Buffy McKenzie, Foxworth 

Elizabeth McKenzie, Columbia 

Gay McKenzie, Columbia 

Kerry McKenzie, Hattiesburg 

Wonda McKie, Jackson 

Regina McKinney, Edinburg 

Edward McLellan, Slidell, La. 



296 People 




1 



it Ik 



! 



.»*■? 







I* 



^ 



•^ (Left) Eating at Seymour's provides stu- 
dents with a place to socialize with friends. 

▼ (Below) The Commons is a great place 
to grab a full course meal before starts 
the day. 



Break from Burgers 




Even with all the restaurants in 
town, many people find it cheaper 
to eat in one of the cafeterias on 
campus. Generally, the food is not 
always that bad, contrary to pot 
lar belief. And the companv^s al- 
ways good. You may notice one of 
your friends all day bang, but rest 
assured you will almost invariably 
find them in Ure Commons or one 
of the oth^r cafeterias. These 



4 I/just love the 
afeteria food 
here." — gina welch 



places are not always just a place 
to eat. They are the social event of 
the century. Here you can make 
your friends laugh and catch up on 



the latest news. 

Food fights almost never hap- 
pen, but you can always peg some- 
one good with a napkin or cup. It's 
the general "Law of the Cafete- 
ria." So next time you are in the 
Commons, sit with special friends 
and make them laugh. Or at least 
hit them with your tray to get their 
attention. 



People 297 



Christy McLemore, Laurel 

Louis McLendon, Waynesboro 

Victor McLendon, Taylorsville 

Tonya McMillan, Moss Point 

Jennifer McMinn, Hammond, La. 

Laurie McMorrough, Belzoni 

Delores McNair, Hattiesburg 

Krystal McNair, Hattiesburg 

Carla McNally, Philadelphia 

Scott McNally, New Orleans, La. 

Kemmie McNeese, Macon 

Scott McNeill, Hattiesburg 

Mona McPhail, Hattiesburg 

Kimberly Meador, Magee 

Richard Meadows, Hattiesburg 

Steven Meadows, Hattiesburg 

Toni Meadows, Laurel 

Stoney Meeks, Vicksburg 

Glen Merritt, Slidell, La. 

Sue Meurer, Slidell, La. 

Jason Meyers, Laurel 

Kaye Meyers, Jayess 

Julie Middlebusher, Fairhope, Ala. 

Kristin Middleton, Brandon 

Tammy Middleton, Laurel 

William Middleton, Monroe, La. 

Cedric Miles, Forest 

Melody Miles, Biloxi 

Janet Miller, El Paso, Texas 

Jody Miller, Waynesboro 



Yolanda Miller, McComb 

Jeffrey Mills, Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 

Kimberly Mills, Pensacola 

Kelly Milton, Natchez 

Victoria Mims, Chicago, 111. 

Kendra Mingo, Jackson 

Allan Misner, McComb 

Meredith Mitchell, Hattiesburg 

Stephen Mitchell, Jackson 

Krista Moak, Ocean Springs 

Janet Mobley, Jackson 

Chandra Moffett, Bay Springs 

Rex Mohon, Natchez 

Christy Moncrief, Gulfport 

James Moniot, Biloxi 

Shelly Monteiro, Houma, La. 

Cynthia Montgomery, Clinton 

Mark Montgomery, Baton Rouge, La. 

Dana Moody, Raymond 

Tela Moody, Lucedale 

Tonia Moody, Brooklyn 

Zandra Moody, Laure 

Lynda Moon, Hattiesburg 

Bobby Moore, Lake 



298 People 









Cathy Moore, Jackson 
Jennifer Moore, Pearl 
Jennifer Moore, West Point 
Karen Moore, Moss Point 
Michelle Moore, Waveland 
Mimsty Moore, Petal 

Octavia Moore, Laurel 
Regina Moore, Laurel 
Rita Moore, Cantoj 
Russell Moore, iJlloxi 
T. Moore, Wesson 
Virginia ^Moore, Lake 

DaJ€ Moran, Pass Christian 
fobin Moran, Gulfport 
Dana Morris, Corinth 
Kinure Morris, Moss Point 
Laura Morris, Purvis 
Sara Morris, Hattiesburg 

Sheri Morris, Natchez 
Stephanie Morris, Laurel 
Anita Mosley, Hattiesburg 
Jackie Mosley, Waynesboro 
Tammy Mosley, Ellisville 
Angie Moss, Laurel 

Dark Moyle, Pearl Rj<er, La. 
Ronnie MozingOyMeridian 
Melanie MullpfC Hattiesburg 
Leslie Muj>n\ Gautier 
CarmepAlurphy, Columbia 
Deijjse Murphy, Milwaukee, Wise. 

Margaret Murray, Natchez 

Roslyn Murray, Greenville 

Leslie Murrell, Forest 

Cynthia Myers, Magee 

Lori Myles, Natchez 

Charles Myrick, Kansas City, Mo. 

Lanardo Myrick, Kansas City, Mo. 

Darryl Neal, Tchula 

Sandra Neal, Crystal Springs 

Scottie Neal, Terry 

John Necaise, Waveland 

Edward Needham, Decatur 

Chantel Nelson, Crystal Springs 

Elizabeth Nelson, Petal 

Tiffany Nelson, Brooklyn 

Tonya Nelson, Magee 

Jeff Nester, Jackson 

Scarlet Netterville, Brookhaven 

Raymond Nettles, Natchez 

Fancy Newman, Jackson 

Leslie Newton, Vicksburg 

Jasmine-Thi Nguyen, Pass Christian 

Karen Nichols, Purvis 

Nikki Nicholson, Hattiesburg 



People 299 



Tashia Nicholson, Louisville 

Dean Nickens, Gonzales, La. 

Jennifer Nicks, Jackson 

Tonyua Nicks, Hattiesburg 

Hiroshi Noda, Okayama, Japan 

Brigid Nodurft, Poplarville 

Christopher Nolan, Vicksburg 

Natalie Noonan, Bay St. Louis 

Alice Norman, Folsom, La. 

Candace Norris, Collins 

Gerald Nuckols, Hattiesburg 

Samantha Oaks, Slidell, La. 

Amy O'Bannon, Memphis, Tenn. 

Ponce OBregon, Guatemala 

Margaret O'Brien, Ocean Springs 

Mary O'Brign, New Orleans, La. 

Chuck O'Connor, Hattiesburg 

Terri O'Connor, Vicksburg 

Jennifer Odom, Fayetteville 

Vesheler Odom, Moss Point 

Jeanne O'Keefe, Ocean Springs 

Nancy Oliver, Indianola 

Andrew O'Malley, New Orleans, La. 

Omega Member, Biloxi, Miss. 

Yoland O'Neal, Crawford 

Melinda Ory, Pascagoula 

Laura Osborne, Richland 

James Oswalt, Jackson 

Penny Overstreet, Decatur 
Sabrina Owens, Jay, Fla. 



Shelley Pace, Hattiesburg 
April Packer, Leakesville 
Juan Packer, Moss Point 
Christine Page, Meridian 
Elizabeth Page, Picayune 
Kentrell Paige, Jackson 

LaMonica Paige, Moss Point 

Angela Pait, Hurley 

Anthony Palazzo, Gulfport 

Doy Palmer, McComb 

Susanne Papa, Vicksburg 

Alan Parker, Laurel 

Andrea Parker, Memphis, Tenn. 

Ginny Parker, Hattiesburg 

Michelle Parker, Biloxi 

Ronald Parker, Gulfport 

Steven Parten, Pearl 

Suzy Parkerson, Pearl 

Timothy Parks, Gulfport 

Tamara Parrish, Laurel 

Twinie Parson, Vicksburg 

Archana Patel, Waynesboro 

Melissa Patrick, Jackson 

April Patton, Jackson 



300 People 





Charra Patton, Jackson 

Robert Payn, Wesson 

April Payne, Jackson 

Luis Paz, Guatemala 

Chris Pazos, New Ck&ans, La. 

Clayton Peacock^r*ensacola, Fla. 

Greg Peacock/Cleveland 

Levestei/Peacock, Cleveland 
Lddip^Peasant, Mobile, Ala. 
ia Peavy, Georgiana, Ala. 
"raci Pellegrine, Jackson 
Michael Pelts, Batesville 
Jim Pennington, Pearl 
James Penny, Jr., Franklinton, La. 



•^ (Left) The "American Way'Xeems to 
have caught up and passed \)*ts person 
"past due that is." 

▼ (Below) These crecXcurds depict a pok- 
er hand of a full h<5use — take your pick. 



Charge No 

Pay MUj 



And 
Later 




"Just charge it," was the favoj 
ite phrase of many a studentvtfnen 
it came time to pay for textbooks, 
clothes, meals, aruKanything 
deemed absolutej^r necessary at 
the time for some instant gratifica- 
tion. 

it was a USM student 
I.D^€ard, Visa, MasterCard or 



"Plastic money will 
get you in trouble 
every time, just like 
women!" - everette 

BROWN 



American Express, many a stu- 
dent was won over by the "buy it 
now, pay later" temptation. Mon- 
ey management sensibility did not 
concern many students until the 
dreaded bill arrived in the mail. 
Yes, offering credit cards to cash 
hungry students was definitely a 
marketing success. 



People 301 



Susan Penton, Slidell, La. 

Sharon Pepper, Vaughan 

Danielel Perez, Gautier 

Phelix Perine, Newark, N.J. 

Phil Perine, Lucedale 

Florence Perkins, Meridian 

Kenneth Perry, Atlanta, Ga. 

Steven Perry, Gautier 

Torsha Perry, Hattiesburg 

Jennifer Peters, Tylertown 

Lori Petersen, Carriere 

Willie Petro, Drew 

Latonia Pettis, Gulfport 

Valenta Petty, Greenwood 

Carol Peyton, Laurel 

Earnie Pheal, Canton 

Jennifer Phifer, Niceville, Fla. 

Kristen Phillips, Hattiesburg 

Leslie Philips, Bay Springs 

Dara Pickering, Florence 

Amy Pickich, Pass Christian 

Lisa Pigford, Hattiesburg 

Gregg Pigg, Flowood 

Kristine Pike, Montgomery, Ala. 

Kathryne Pinnix, Pensacola, Fla. 

Brenda Pinter, Hattiesburg 

Billy Pipkin, Vicksburg 

Tina Pipkins, Lucedale 

Kelli Pique, Gautier 

Allan Pirtle, Montgomery, Ala. 

Dominick Pittari, Belle Chasse, La. 

Jackie Pittman, Sandy Hook 

Marrcellus Pittman, Sandy Hook 

Stephanie Pittman, Shreveport, La. 

Raymond Pitts, Ponchatoula, La. 

Michael Plankers, Laurel 

Theresa Polk, Columbia 

Mary Poole, Madison 

William Poole, Yazoo City 

Laura Poore, Florence 

Gary Porche, Magnolia 

Jeninfer Potts, Etta 

Troy Pounds, Laurel 

Arleatha Powe, Meridian 

Aaron Powell, Waco, Texas 

Albert Powell, Waco, Texas 

Allen Powell, Waco, Texas 

Alvin Powell, Waco, Texas 

Sandra Powell, Charleston 

John Prentiss, Leakesville 

Dane Prestridge, Natchez 

Kim Price, Columbia 

Michelle Price, Gulfport 

Michelle Price, Slidell, La. 



302 People 





Rachel Price, Raymond 
Toni Price, Mendenhall 
Garett Prins, Ontario, Canada 
Laura Pryor, Laurel 
Ldward Pugh, Biloxi 
Leigh Purkerson, Hattiesburg 

Yolanda Purnell, Biloxi 
Christy Pursell, Lucedale 
Amanda Purser, Hazlejrurst 
Carolyn Quinlan, M^ndeville, La. 
Roderick Quinlaflf Gulfport 
Jocelyn RackAey, Ocean Springs 

Shari Erajoo, Durban, South Africa 
Tin^Ramey, Waynesboro 

licia Ramos, Mobile, Ala. 
Buck Randall, Jackson 
Kimberly Ratcliff, Tylertown 
Catherine Ratcliffe, Natchez 

Virginia Ratcliffe, Natchez 
Chante Ravesies, Hattiesburg 
Pamela Rawlinson, Columbus 
John Rayborn, Franklinton, La. 
Tracey Raybourn, Columbia 
Jerry Read, DeKalb 




Susan Ready, Greenville 
Skye Reardon, Hattiesburg 
Rhonda Reaves, Vkxsburg 
Richard Rector/Diboll, Texas 
Michele Reddoch, Laurel 
Hillman Reed, Yazoo City 

Stppnanie Reed, Clinton 
.oriann Reep, Jackson 
Kimberley Reese, Hazelhurst 
Leigh Reese, New Orleans, La. 
Heather Reeves, Gautier 
Padra Reeves, Hattiesburg 

Sandy Reid, Biloxi 
Daniel Reiling, Ocean Springs 
Michael Reimer, Missoula, Mont. 
Mary Reynolds, Belzoni 
Timothy Reynolds, Slidell, La. 
Frank Rhinehart, Natchez 

Terrie Rhodes, Bay St. Louis 
Kellie Rials, Jayess 
Ashley Rich, Mobile, Ala. 
Daniel Rich, Milton, Fla. 
Lelia Rich, Richton, Miss. 
Patricia Richard, Magnolia 

Greta Richardson, Gretna, La. 
Righir Richardson, Crystal Springs 
Elizabeth Ricks, Hernando 
Heidi Rieth, New Orleans, La. 
Tracy Rigsby, Vicksburg 
Edward Riley, Sumrall 



People 303 



Melissa Riley, Victoria 

Tammy Riley, Madison 

Teejay Riley, Hattiesburg 

Charlotte Roberts, Biloxi 

Garyeth Roberts, Florence 

Lori Roberts, Brandon 

Margo Roberts, New Albany 

Maria Roberts, Baton Rouge, La. 

Melanie Roberts, Detroit, Mich. 

Randy Roberts, Bogue Chitto 

Sherry Roberson, Durant 

Deborah Robertson, Jackson 

Lillie Robertson, Jackson 

Margaret Robertson, Hattiesburg 

Mary Robertson, Myrtle 

Kim Robinett, Purvis 

LaVetta Robinson, Terry 

Leslie Robinson, Ellisville 

Patrick Robinson, Laurel 

Robyn Roby, Natchez 

Rudy Rodriguez, Qulin, Mo. 

Alicia Rogers, Taylorsville 

Julia Rogers, Meridian 

Laura Rogers, Ocean Springs 

Stephanie Rogers, Laurel 

Tarann Rogers, State Line 

Linda Rone, Hernando 

Samuel Rosa, Collins 

Mona Ross, Belzoni 

Veronica Rosser, Bay Springs 

Gregory Rothberg, Tarzana, Cal. 

Rachel Rouse, Slidell, La. 

Michelle Ruiz, Picayune 

Amy Runnels, Magee 

Jennifer Runnels, Mize 

Denise Rush, Philadelphia 

Kim Rushing, Gulfport 

Kurt Rushing, Natchez 

Lisa Rushing, Brookhaven 

Pamela Rushing, Gloster 

Tommie Rushton, Laurel 

Amy Russell, New Hebron 

Jenean Russell, Columbia 

Laura Russell, Brandon 

Mark Russell, Sumrall 

Jay Rustin, Laurel 

Alissa Ruth, Pearl 

Christie Ryals, Hattiesburg 

Doreen Ryals, Philadelphia 

Keith Runnels, Slidell, La. 

Jean Sadaway, Baton Rouge, La. 

Sandy Salers, Pearl 

Angie Saliba, Hattiesburg 

Stephanie Sampson 



304 People 





"4 (I-eft) For Hillcrest residents, riding the 
bus is part of university life. 
▼ (Below) Bikes are used for transporta- 
tion and to meet people. 



Getting Armind 




USM students have their own 
unique way of getting to or around 
campus, depending on the dis- 
tance, conditions of the weather 
and the availability of parking 
spaces. 

Most students who sj#y on cam- 
pus usually travel byloot since the 
buildings are ckfse or somewhat 
close to the/residence halls. Stu- 
dents amHftaff that stay near the 
campus may also walk depending 

'the unpredictable weather. 
Some people have no choice but to 
walk in the rain while other people 



"W4 great taking 
le bus, I don't have 
to walk back to my 

Car." — ANN SMITH 

ride in cars. But those people have 
one bad advantage, there is not 
enough parking spaces for com- 
muting students and staff. Some 
people do not have to worry about 
this problem because they ride 
bikes to campus. There are many 
bike racks on campus. Still, other 



people who stay farther away from 
campus will have to drive or take 
the bus. Those who take the bus 
have a problem if they miss it, 
while other students cannot make 
it because they do not have gas 
money or bus fare. 

But, all in all, students and fac- 
ulty and staff members get here 
one way or the other. No matter 
what kind of weather, distance, or 
space, these people will come ei- 
ther by foot, cars, bikes or busses. 
ij By Pam Ragsdale 



People 305 



L. A. Sanchez, Hattiesburg 

Adonis Sanders, Hattiesburg 

Angela Sanders, Gulfport 

Lori Sandifer, Monticello 

Sonja Sandig, Gulfport 

Pamela Sanford, Petal 

Rose Sanford, Franklinton, La. 

Tammy Sanford, Seminary 

Shelley Sansing, Petal 

Amy Sarine, Brandon 

Arnold Sartin, Pontotoc 

Kimberly Saucier, Foxworth 

Melanie Saulters, Louisville 

Renee Schaefer, Diamondhead 

Susan Schoel, Tuscumbia, Ala. 

Sarah Scheuermann, Picayune 

Traci Schexnayder, Long Beach 

Melissa Schjerven, Grenada 

Joseph Schlater III, Slidell, La. 

Cynthia Scott, Clarksdale 

Marc Scott, Jackson 

Monica Scruggs, Hattiesburg 

Victoria Scully, Long Beach 

Sharon Seago, McComb 

Michael Seal, Hattiesburg 

Susie Seal, Picayune 

Susan Seale, Carnes 

Patricia Seals, McComb 

Traci Selman, Bryan, Texas 

Troy Selmon, Utica 

Joy Senseney, Biloxi 

Selena Sewer, Columbia 

Stephanie Seymour, Ocean Springs 

Brad Sharp, Hattiesburg 

Yvette Shaw, Clarksdale 

Mary Sheffield, Hattiesburg 

Dixie Shephard, Clarksdale 

Monica Shepherd, Jackson 

Sandra Sheridan, Bogalusa, La. 

Kathleen Sherman, Hattiesburg 

Amy Shifalo, Hattiesburg 

Delaine Shirley, Waynesboro 

Rebecca Shirley, Independence 

Shi Zhenjiang, Beijing, China 

Gabriel Shoemaker, Slidell, La. 

Lisa Shore, Biloxi 

Joe Shoulders, Mobile, Ala. 

Douglas Shows, Little Rock, Ark. 

Paula Shows, Magee 
Jenifer Sicura, Biloxi 
Elizabeth Simeon, New Orleans, La. 
Lori Simmons, Biloxi 
Lesley Simpson, Ocala, Fla. 
John Sims, Lucedale 



306 People 





•^ (Left) Students often study in tj>c priva- 
cy of their rooms. 
▼ (Below) This student eag€rly returns to 
her residence hall after srlong, hot summer. 




Sunday Night Syndrome 




After a long day of classes and 
errands for various organizations, 
it is always nice to come back to 
the room and chill out. In most 
cases, a coke is opened, the T\ 
turned on and friends aarther 
around for stories of the^day's ex- 
periences. The stories'always seem 
to follow along/fne same lines: 
"That econoHncs test was from 
hell" or>"f did so well on my 
Chemistry test that everyone 
asked for help. I enjoyed blowing 
Them off like yesterday's news." 



"Li 
fnc« 



in the resi- 
halls would 
be more enjoyable 
with personal maid 
service!" 

— RENA WILLIAMS 



Perhaps no one gathers around, 
and rather than relax, you study 
for an upcoming exam or just to 



keep up with the class. Whatever 
happens, you always have a friend 
next door or downstairs or wherev- 
er who you can always visit or, 
most likely, harass for the pure en- 
joyment of it. And sometimes, you 
can go visit that special someone in 
the women's or men's residence 
halls. With so many people to 
know and visit, it is no wonder that 
many people choose to live on cam- 
pus. || By Vincent Clark 



People 307 



Loyd Sims, Bay Springs, 

Himbert Sinopoli, Gulfport 

Michelle Skiles, New Orleans, La. 

Ashley Skellie, Long Beach 

Aaron Skipper, Natchez 

Kimsye Slaughter, Jackson 

Sandra Slawson, Ocean Springs 

Carlos Slawson, Slidell, La. 

Aubrey Smith, Independence 

Brunette Smith, Waynesboro 

Carolyn Smith, Natchez 

Chris Smith, Summit 

Clay Smith, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Connie Smith, Bassfield 

Darren Smith, Mobile, Ala. 

Donna Smith, Laurel 

Greg Smith, Bolton 

Jarrod Smith, Tylertown 

Jeannie Smith, Vicksburg 

Jennifer Smith, McComb 

Jennifer Smith, Lucedale 

Jennifer Smith, Petal 

Jonathan Smith, Pell City, Ala. 

Julie Smith, Tupelo 

Karen Smith, Senatobia 

Kelley Smith, Brighton, Tenn. 

Kelly Smith, Meridian 

Kevin Smith, Natchez 

Lisa Smith, Belzoni 

Robert Smith, Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Robyn Smith, Ocean Springs 

Samuel Smith, Bay St. Louis 

Sandee Smith, Biloxi 

Shavett Smith, Starkville 

Shelby Smith, Lucedale 

Verna Smith, Madison 

Judy Smithhart, Vicksburg 

Christine Smothers, Gulfport 

Barbara Snow, Hardin, 111. 

Michael Snowden, Mobile, Ala. 

Yvette Soulie, Luling, La. 

Sherry Southern, Purvis 

Mitzie Sowell, Kilbourne, La. 

Regina Spain, New Orleans, La. 

Andrew Spaniol, Opelousas, La. 

Richie Spears, Meridian 

Susan Spears, Meridian 

LaShawn Speed, Kosciusko 

Carla Speights, Prentiss 

Joseph Speights, Brookhaven 

Sheldon Speights, Columbia 

Julia Spencer, Sontag 

Mark Spencer, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Mary Spencer, Tupelo 



308 People 





Michael Spencer, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Sonya Spencer, Monticello 

Tunga Spencer, Quitman 

Aminta Spight, Holly Springs 

Joseph Spring, McComb 

Julian Springier, Metairie, La. 

Michael Stallworth, MobiJefAla. 
Elizabeth Stanley, Ocelli Springs 
William Stanford, Vicksburg 
Suzanne Stantotf; Brandon 
Fred Starnex^lidell, La. 
Angela Steed, Petal 

ichael Steele, Purvis 
Barry Steinacher, Fairhope, Ala. 
Suzanne Stephens, New Hebron 
Beverly Stevens, Jackson 
Danica Stevens, Huntsville, Ala. 
Jennifer Stevens, Hattiesburg 

Kelly Stevenson, Daleville 
Billy Stewart, Pearl 
Connie Stewart, Prentiss 
Meredith Stewart, Hattiesburg 
Sharon Stewart, Carriere 
Tanya Stewart, Pascagou 

Amy Stiglet, Moss/f oint 
Shannon Stockman, Bay Sprin 
Donnica StpCKstill, Picayune 
Donna Srockstill, Picayune 
Belipda Stogner, McComb 
frnes Stogner, Sandy Hook 

Stephen Stogner, Bogalusa, La. 
Jennifer Stokley, Gautier 
Tony Stokley, Pascagoula 
Bryan Strachan, Corinth 
Deborah Straub, Hattiesburg 
Seth Stringer, Coffeeville 

Denise Strong, Bay St. Louis 
Shane Strong, Long Beach 
Maria Stroud, Ocean Springs 
Tracey Stroup, Charlottesville, Va. 
Mauri Stubbs, Flowood 
Jennifer Sudebaker, Vicksburg 

Annie Sturdivant, Natchez 
Chip Sturdivant, Natchez 
Delores Sullivan, Hattiesburg 
James Sullivan, Biloxi 
Kandace Sullivan, Sumrall 
Lynda Sullivan, Gulfport 

Peggy Sullivan, Gulfport 

Tara Sullivan, Biloxi 

Leyla Sumar, Comayaqua, Honduras 

Sapardi Sumardi, Sabah, Malaysia 

Rachel Summerson, Vicksburg 

Richard Sumrall, Mobile, Ala. 




People 309 



Laura Surratt, Biloxi 

Robyn Sutton, Prentiss 

Alissa Swanner, Raceland, La. 

Christine Swindle, McComb 

Duke Swyers, Brandon 

Syafril Syarief, Hattiesburg 

Kristna Szmurlo, Biloxi 

Stacey Tagert, Baker, La. 

Michele Tait, Gautier 

Tonya Tait, Moss Point 

Monica Tamor, Osyka 

Regenia Tate, Jackson 

Amy Taylor, Madison 

Jennifer Taylor, Bruce 

Kay Taylor, Waynesboro 

Thelma Taylor, Jackson 

Kimberly Taylor, Franklinton, La. 

Marie Taylor, Columbia 

Robert Taylor, Laurel 

Tammy Taylor, Liberty 

Virna Taylor, Angvilla 

Jeffrey Temple, McComb 

Sharon Temple, Ellisville 

Steven Temple, McComb 

Karen Terrell, Ansley 

Tarsha Terrible, Jackson 

Robby Terry, Raleigh, N.C. 

Natalie Thames, Isola 

Stacey Theobald, Pass Christian 

Elizabeth Therrell, Biloxi 



310 People 




Carol Thigpen, Picayune 
Cassandra Thomas, Natchez 



Marsie Thomas, Greenville 
Michael Thomas, Franklinton 



Molly Thomas, Jackson 
Stanley Thomas III, Batesville 



Tonya Thomas, Jackson 

Dana Thomley, Brandon *,'*\ 

t--l 






•^ (Left) Sally Dees accepts her awara^fforn Dr. Lucas as an 
inductee into the USM Hall of Fa> 

▼ (Below) Everette 
from Dr. Durkee. 




AWARDSJ9AY 




Awards day is set aside each 
year to acknowledge the hard work 
of USM students. Among the hon- 
ors bestowed are the Best Citizen 
Awards, Phi Kappa Phi and Hi 
of Fame. Selected this year teethe 
Hall of Fame were: John^dward 
Brown, Sally Ann Dpd;, Richard 
Allen HammondyMichelle Renee 
Jerome, Kenneth Morgan 
McCarty,/Kx)bert Dewitt Pierce, 
Jonathan Michael Richard, Billy 
Wa-yne Stewart and Rebecca 
.ynn Wright. Many students look 
forward to this day all year long in 



U 



Avyafds Day gives 
the opportunity 
to work with facul- 
ty and staff on a 
program to honor 
some of USM's top 
students." 



— ROSIE 



labors. Among the awards given is 
a cash prize handed to a "quiet, 
hard-working student" called the 
Judge R. J. Bishop Mississippian 
Award. This year the award went 
to Karla B. Antonelli who despite 
hardships, excelled in her studies 
here at USM. This outstanding 
student will always be seen as 
"Worth Her Weight in GOLD." 



NETTLES 



hopes that at last they can receive 
recognition for the fruits of their 



People 311 



Satoya Thompkins, Prairie Point 

Cindy Thompson, Collins 

Craig Thompson, Vicksburg 

Dawn Thompson, Houston, Texas 

Dennis Thompson, Jackson 

Eric Thompson, Mobile, Ala. 

Germaine Thompson, Natchez 

Lisa Thompson, Bassfield 

Richard Thompson, Sumrall 

Sharon Thompson, Crystal Springs 

Sharon Thompson, Summit 

Tammy Thompson, Hazlehurst 

Tony Thompson, Summit 

Willie Thornton, Gulfport 

Mindy Thurmond, Slidell, La. 

Melissa Tidwell, Summit 

Tim Tilson, Crystal Springs 

LaRonda Tinney, Aurora, Col. 

Robin Toney, Yazoo City 

Thomas Toomey, Mobile, Ala. 

Fred Toplin, Greenville 

Cynthia Topps, Jackson 

Danielle Torres, New Orleans, La. 

Jennifer Traynom, Pensacola, Fla. 

Angela Trest, Clinton 

Donna Trigg, Gautier 

Patricia Trigg, Florence 

William Trigg, Seminary 

Laura Trimble, Petal 

Valeria Trotter, Ocean Springs 

Anet Trouble, Alabama 

Anita Trouble, Alabama 

Brian Tubbs, Dare Town, N.J. 

Phyliss Tucker, Biloxi 

Amy Tullis, Ashland, Ky. 

Andra Tullos, Columbia 

Tanya Tullos, Pelahatchie 

Jennifer Turner, Belzoni 

Nichole Turner, Natchez 

Sharon Turner, West Point 

Wanda Turner, Hattiesburg 

Kimberly Upton, Bay Springs 

Jeff Upton, Vicksburg 

Mario Vaccarella, Slidell, La. 

Natalie Valasek, Columbus 

Al Vance, Winona 

Janis Vance, Union 

Melba Vannest, Poplarvile 

Amy Vaughan, Slidell, La. 

Bennie Vaughn, Greenville 

Jill Vaughn, Durant 

Trina Vaughn, Picayune 

Marilyn Vertison, Rolling Fork 

Julia Viator, Tupelo 




'mmm 



3 1 2 People 



! K 



" 



«>- 





Receptions 



The Universtiy Union and the 
Greek Life Office hosted recep- 
tions on December 5 & 6, 1989. 
The receptions were in honor of, 
Warren Dunn for 17 years of i 
vice as Union Director and / bar- 
bara Ross for 17 years o£service as 
Greek Life Directop^During the 
ceremonies, they^were presented 
plaques to commemorate the years 
they s pern in each office. Mr. 
DunnXplaque was hung in a cen- 
tral location in the R. C. Cook 
Jniversity Union and Ms. Ross's 
was hung on a wall in Wilbur 
Hall's lobby. 



"I consider myself 
be lucky to have 
worked for a man 
such as Warren 
Dunn. Rarely does 
a person have the 
opportunity to gain 
so much knowledge 
and experience 
while maintaining a 
lifelong friend." — 

CHRIS CRENSHAW 



Ir* 




•^ (Left) Mr. Warren Dunn accepts a 
plaque from Chris Crenshaw, assistant d 
rector of the Union and Student Activities 



▼ (Bottom) USM faculty, staff 
dents enjoy cake and sweets at 
oring Mr. Warren Dunn fqj/rus 1 7 years of 
service as Union Direc 




People 3 1 3 



Ray Vick, Smithdale 

Julie Vicknair, Thibodeaux, La. 

Cesar Villanueva, La Paz, Bolivia 

Christopher Viverette, Moss Point 

Dana Vogt, D'Iberville 

Lane Wade, Laurel 

Pamela Waggoner, Forest 

Colleen Wagner, Akron, Oh. 

Patricia Waits, Gulfport 

Lela Walker, Lauderdale 

Primrose Elizabeth Walker, Atlanta, Ga. 

Kenitra Wallace, Jackson 

Sharon Wallace, Waynesboro 

Pamela Walley, Pascagoula 

Andrea Walston, Meridian 

Wendy Walston, Brandon 

Rhonda Walters, Meridian 

Dexter Walton, Nicholson 

David Wang, Hattiesburg 

Michele Wanko, New Orleans, La. 

Staci Wann, Jackson 

Charles Ward, Tunica 

Gary Ward, Pearl 

Sebastian Ward, McComb 

Selina Ward, Ocean Springs 

Natalia Ware, Biloxi 

Lisa Warren, Sandy Hook 

Danna Roberts Warren, Stringer 

William Warsaw, Clinton 

Latisha Wash, Laurel 

Chris Washam, Ruston, La. 

Amy Washburn, Biloxi 

Yolanda Washington, Biloxi 

Kiyomia Watabe, Japan 

Gerald Watson, Biloxi 

Ursula Watson, Brandon 

Douglas Watts, Vicksburg 

Dabney Weatherford, Birmingham, Ala. 

Johnny Weathersby, Jackson 

Lori Weaver, Newton 

Monique Weaver, Slidell, La. 

Brigitte Webb, Bogalusa, La. 

James Webb, Raleigh 

Nichelle Webber, West Point 

Torowal Webber, Hattiesburg 

Darla Welch, Mendenhall 

Molly Weems, Bay St. Louis 

Shelley Weidman, Waveland 

Larry Welborn, Laurel 

Kyle Welch, Spring, Texas 

Robert Welch, Magee 

Jacquelyn Wells, Gulfport 

Elizabeth Welsh, Jackson 

Michael Wells, Waynesboro 



314 People 





•^ (Left) It took the skill and precj^slash 
that was being performed by the><udents to 
carve the perfect pumpkin Ip'win the con- 
test. 



Holiday Festiymes 




Halloween was the first holiday 
observed on campus during the 
school term. The UAC held a jack 
o-lantern contest that brought q, 
the uniqueness in some students. 

After the Thanksgiving break 
many of the students^euirned sick 
of turkey, but Christmas was in the 
air. Trees wenfup and lights came 
on arounjKthe dorms and frat 
houses 

10 could forget St. Valen- 
Ine's Day? Love was in the air 
with all the card giving and flow- 
ers. Other holidays were observed, 
but most students defiantly ob- 
served those four between classes. 
!J| By Lorna Freeman 



[olidays on cam- 
pus were never un- 
celebrated; some 
new ones were 
probably even in- 
vented." 

— NEIL ANDERSON 



A (Above) A typical USM student pre- 
pares his pumpkin for the Halloween 
pumpkin carving contest. • Photos by Gary 
Haygood 



People 3 1 5 



B. J. Wescovich, Moss Point 

Brigitte West, Petal 

Christopher Westbrook, Jackson 

Sherry Westbrook, Liberty 

Toni Westbrook, Liberty 

Virginia Wheat, Rolling Fork 

Amy Wheeler, Olive Branch 

Ashley White, Birmingham, Ala. 

Deidra White, Natchez 

Gastinel White, Zachary, La. 

James White, Mize 

Janet White, Hattiesburg 

Jerry White, Pearl 

Laurie White, Jackson 

Pattie White, Olive Branch 

Paul White, Columbia 

Ursula Whitehead, Picayune 

Jonathon Whitfield, Picayune 

Frederick Whitlock, Jackson 

Kinette Whittington, Vicksburg 

Memrie Whittington, Brandon 

Tomekia Whittle, Vancleave 

Stacey Wibright, Slidell, La. 

Guyce Wilkerson, Pineville 

Welsey Wilkes, Hattiesburg 

Angela Wilkie, Luling, La. 

Anita Williams, Indianola 

Bettie Williams, Shuqualak 
Breshell Williams, Jackson 
Brian Williams, Booneville 

Carol Williams, Poplarville 

Carol Williams, Saraland, Ala. 

Cecilia Williams, Laurel 

Celeste Williams, Hattiesburg 

Charlotte Williams, Ellisville 

Cindy Williams, Laurel 

Francelia Williams, Cary 

Kendra Williams, Slidell, La. 

Kimberlie Williams, Purvis 

Larry Williams, Grenada 

Missy Williams, Jackson 

Nicole Williams, Natchez 

Opal Williams, Vicksburg 

Stevie Williams, Harrisville 

Terro Williams, Mound Bayou 

Tessie Williams, Hattiesburg 

Ronald Williamson, Greenwood 

Serry Williamson, Hattiesburg 

Evelyn Willis, Columbus 

Lisa Willis, Newton 

Patti Willson, Leesville, La. 

Alicia Wilson, Brookhaven 

Anita Wilson, Hattiesburg 

David Wilson, D'lberville 



3 1 6 People 





•^ (Left) Dr. Frank Glamser, an Earth Lri> 
speaker, tried to make the best of th^situa- 
tion since the Earth Day program was 
moved inside due to the rajflfr ( Below) If 
you needed any tips aR how to save the 
earth, these bookssdpplied you with a lot of 
valuable infowration. 



Earth Day 



Ernie Guyton, a member optne 
USM Anthropology Club^€d the 
organizing of events fprThe USM 
Earth Day Celebration on Sunday, 
April 22. 

More tha-ff 200 students attend- 
ed the^ay s events, which included 
speeches to promote environmen- 
tal awareness and performances 
by various bands, along with re- 
freshments of purified water, lem- 




"The rain made 
Earth Day 1990 
perfect, but every 
day is Earth Day." 

— STEVE ZARY 



onade and a variety of vegetarian 
dishes. 

This decade will hopefully begin 
a new awareness of environmental 
concerns. Students of today will 
definitely make a difference in the 
preservation of our planet for the 
future. Viewing the success of the 
event on campus makes us all more 
optimistic about the future. 



People 3 1 7 



> ■ 



Debora Wilson, Dekalb 

Kimberly Wilson, Bassfield 

Terry Wilson, Franklinton, La. 

Nila Windham, Bay Springs 

Phatasis Winfrey, Drew 

Michael Winger, Vicksburg 

Mark Wink, Memphis, Tn. 

Samantha Winters, Long Beach, Cal. 

Christopher Wise, Picayune 

Douglas Wise, Biloxi 

Joseph Wise, Hattiesburg 

Tammy Wise, Vancleave 

Michele Wishart, Saucier 

Dre Wissner, Jackson 

Sharyle Wolfe, Fayette 

James Womack, Magee 

Peter Woo, Inverness 

Angela Wood, Prentiss 

Charlotte Wood, Biloxi 

Melissa Wood, Bogalusa, La. 

Janice Woodard, Carriere 

Kathy Woodard, Lucedale 

Wendy Woodard, New Orleans, La. 

Kelly Woods, Moss Point 

Neil Woods, Biloxi 

Scott Woods, New Orleans, La. 

Bettie Wraggs, Louisville 

Ginny Wray, Leaksville 

Pier Wright, Columbus 

Stanley Wright, New Hebron 



James Wynne, London, England 
Mona Yates, Gulfport 



Melanie Yeatman, Petal 
Dianna Yelverton, Pearl 



Shuk Yee Yip, Hong Kong 
Howard Yocow, Gulfport 



Andre 1 Young, Jackson 
Patrick Young, Gulfport 



3 1 8 People 




Julie Youngblood, New Orleans, La. 
Leslie Zanders, Boodieland 
Holly Zemke, New Orleans, La. 
Michelle Zenner, North Tondawanda, NY 




March 30, 1990 was the 8$ 
birthday of our respected nxsfltu- 
tion and USM graduates and 
friends all over the country cele- 
brated the day witMestivities, par- 
ties, meetingsy^nd dinners remi- 
niscent of $Mys at USM. 



"USM Day helps 
to get alumni 
thinking about the 
university." 

— RON PHILLIPS Director of 
Alumni Affairs 



The biggest celebrations took 
place in Hattiesburg but celebra- 
tions of all kinds happened all over 
the world as even just two people 
came together to share USM ex- 
periences. || By Heather McKee 



People 319 



Monica Abney 156, 266 

James Abbott III 164 

Amy Adams 154 

Gary Adams 188 

John Adams 182 

Kristin Adams 266 

LaGina Adams 266 

Lance Adams 186 

Todd Adams 

Rusty Adcock 266 

Carrie Aden 154 

Danial Ahmed 266 

Tammy Ahrend 266 

Beth Ainsworth 266 

Jerry Ainsworth 266 

LeAnne Ainsworth 142 

Pepper Ainsworth 156 

Joanna Albritton 266 

Perry Alba 142 

Terry Alcorn 266 

Lynne Alexander 152 

James Alford 266 

Vernita Alford 266 

Patrice Algero 266 

Rachel Alinsunurin 266 

Curt Allen 174 

Eric Allen 266 

Joe Allen II 266 

Roby Allen 170 

Sharon Allen 266 

Venetta Allen 266 

Christopher Alley 180 

Charles Allison 266 

John Alliston 160, 266 

Candace Allred 148, 266 

Jessica Allred 152, 266 
Frank Alquist 188 
Bradley Amacker 266 
Andrea Ambrose 168, 266 
Mahmoud Amjadi 266 
Felissa Armistad 266 
Gayle Anders 266 
Barry Anderson 266 
Cornelius Anderson 266 
Craig Anderson 266 
Elaine Anderson 266 
Ernestine Anderson 266 
Elizabeth Anderson 266 
Langdon Anderson 266 
Laura Anderson 266 
Martha Anderson 266 
Michael Anderson 150 
Michelle Anderson 266 
Mignyon Anderson 168, 266 
Neil Anderson 170 
Paula Anderson 154, 266 
Tammy Anderson 154, 266 
Tiffany Anderson 266 
Todd Anderson 150 
Tom Anderson 150 
Kevin Anderton 186 
William Anding III 266 
Gregg Andrews 150 
Ken Andrews 170 
Twila Andrews 266 
Veronica Andrews 266 
Cathy Andrum 178 
Steve Angelo 170 
Karla Antonelli 266 
Patrick Arbour 184, 266 
Chris Arcement 266 
Caroline Argus 142 
Mary Argus 156, 266 
Steve Armstrong 150, 266 
Stacy Arnold 168, 266 
Ashley Aronstcin 154 
Michael Arrington 266 
Hillary Ashcraft 178 
Kendra Ashley 266 
Laura Ashley 148, 266 
Alicia Ashworth 268 
William Atkins 160, 268 
Chris Atkinson 268 
Rachel Atkinson 162, 268 
Susan Atkinson 154 



Jessica Atteberry 268 
Mark Atteberry 164 
Roland Austin 268 
Shannon Ayers 268 



B 



Virginia Baddley 154, 268 
Alyce Badeaux 268 
Katrina Baggett 268 
Michael Bagwell 180 
Carolyn Bailey 268 
Cynthia Bailey 268 
Heather Bailey 268 
Lisa Bailey 268 
Ruby Bailey 268 
Tim Bailey 170 
David Baker 182 
Dreck Baker 268 
Kelly Baker 268 
Holly Baldwin 268 
Lisa Ball 156, 268 
Greg Balser 170 
James Balthrop 268 
Teri Sue Bankston 268 
Chris Barfield 170 
William Bargetzi 268 
Rob Barham 268 
Peter Barhonovich 174 
Melissa Baria 268 
Dwight Barker 268 
Sonny Barker 268 
Brian Barkley 268 
William Barksdale 164 
Co-Sandra Barnes 268 
Jimmy Barnes 268 
Monica Barnes 268 
Steve Barnes 174 
Ann Barnett 268 
Heather Barnett 162, 268 

Kandy Barr 268 

Wendy Barrett 176, 268 
James Barrilleaux 268 

Lisa Barrios 268 

Jennifer Barry 268 

Anne Bartee 268 

Joey Barthes 182 

Nicole Barthes 154, 268 

Sharon Barton 268 

Danny Bass 180 

Kimberly Bass 268 

William Bass 188 

Rolonda Bates 268 

Myrna Batson 144, 268 

Jeffrey Battle 184 

Krisstina Baucum 168, 268 

Lisa Baugh 156, 268 

Denine Baygents 156 

Mollie Bayhi 168 

Louise Baylis-Daniels 268 

Tommy Baylis 186 

Jennifer Beall 178 

Andrew Beamon 268 

Trisha Beamon 268 

Angela Bean 154, 268 

Barry Beard 268 

Tanya Beard 268 

Wendy Bearden 178 

Julie Beaupre 268 

Richard Beavers 180 

Monica Beausoleil 178 

Richard Beckford 268 

Nikkitta Beckley 270 

Chris Beckman 152 

Bret Becton 188 

Kate Bedenbaugh 162, 270 

Lisa Bedwell 270 

Mike Beland 270 

John Belham 270 

Heather Bell 270 

Kelvin Bell 270 

Kimberly Bell 270 

Jennifer Bellamy 270 

Shannon Bellatti 156, 270 

Cheryl Benjamin 270 
Beatrice Bennett 270 
Chris Bennett 270 
Chris Bennett 160 



Jason Bennett 270 
Miriam Bennett 144, 270 
Julia Benton 270 
Sarah Benton 152, 270 
David Berard 160, 270 
Gregg Berault 1 50 
Todd Berrier 150, 270 
Chandra Berry 158, 270 
Dianna Berry 270 
Leon Berry 170 
Phelicia Berry 158, 270 
Angela Besh 154 
Eduardo Betancourt 270 
Robert Betcher 184 
Shelly Bethea 178 
Terry Bethea 174 
Lordea Bethley 158 
Barbara Betts 270 
Faleshia Betts 270 
Tammi Bew 144, 270 
Janet Biglane 270 
Melissa Bilbo 270 
Wendy Bilbo 270 
Michael Bindei 270 
Angela Bingham 270 
Keith Bishop 270 
Noel Black 168, 270 
Tammy Black 270 
Traci Blackburn 142 
Jane Blackledge 270 
Brette Blackman 270 
Ashley Blackmon 270 
Anthony Blackwell 160, 270 
Jason Blake 160, 270 
Sonya Blakely 270 
Cecilia Blakeney 270 
Dena Blakeney 176 
Laura Blakeslee 152 
Ashley Blalock 162 

Issac Blalock 270 

Keith Blalock 182, 270 
Steven Blesse 270 

Charles Blue 270 

Brian Boatman 150 

Todd Boatman 150 

Eli Bodden 270 

Rosa Bodden 270 

Racheal Bodie 168, 270 

John Boepple 270 

Kathryn Boh 270 

Alison Bohanon 176 

Jaafre Bolden 270 

Garland Boleware 186 

Barbara Bond 162, 270 

Ethan Bond 184 

Stephanie Bond 270 

Tana Bond 178 

Jessica Bones 270 

Chad Bonner 184 

Rhonda Bookout 168, 271 

George Booth 271 

Maury Booth 146, 271 

Blake Boudreaux 184 

Jody Boudreaux 184 

Shander Bouldin 271 

Kelly Bounds 271 

Kristi Bourne 271 

Jean Boutwell 271 

Robert Boutwell 271 

Sonya Boutwell 271 

Danny Bowering 186 

Monica Bowie 168, 271 

Terrance Bowie 271 
Bobby Bowlin 271 

Jeff Bowman 186 

Shana Bowman 271 
Marjorie Bowron 162 
Sherri Boyce 176 
Carolyn Boyd 271 
Jan Boyd 271 
James Boyd 271 
Patrick Boyd 271 
Trevor Boyd 184 
John Boycr 271 
Amanda Boykin 271 
Valorie Boykin 271 
Anna Bracero 271 
Wendy Bracey 271 
Zoneicc Bradford 271 



Brandee Bradley 176 
Christopher Bradley 271 
Scott Bradley 188 
Stacey Bradshaw 271 
Jeffrey Brady 271 
Steven Brady 174 
Frances Brandeau 176 
Marti Brasher 271 
Marc Bratton 170 
Jerry Bray 271 
Paul Breckenridge 184 
Tim Breedlove 174 
Todd Breedlove 174 
Cristine Breerwood 178 
Lakisha Breland 319 
Natalie Breland 154 
Stefanie Breland 154 
Jecyn Bremer 271 
Caroline Brenke 178 
Greg Brett 184 
Michelle Brewer 142 

Bonnie Bridgers 152 
Amy Bridges 271 

Darryl Bridges 271 

Jerilyn Bridges 271 

Nancy Bridges 271 

Eddie Briggs 140 

Lisa Bright 176 

David Brister 271 

Carl Britt Jr. 188 

Jarred Britt 186 

Derrell Britton 271 

Andy Broadhead 186 

Barbi Broadus 168 

James Broadwater 271 

Tanya Broadway 271 

Laura Brock 142 

Barry Brooks 150 

Delma Brooks 271 

Marshella Broom 271 

Shea Broom 154 

Christopher Brouillette 271 

Brent Broussard 180 

Tina Broussard 

Amy Brown 154 

Andrea Brown 168, 271 

Augusta Brown 271 

Billy Brown 271 

Cleveland Brown 271 

Cliff Brown 271 

Connie Brown 271 

Everetle Brown 146, 271 

Garrett Brown 271 

Georgia Brown 162, 271 

Jacqueline Brown 271 

John E. Brown 271 

John H. Brown 272 

Joseph Brown 273 

Jovanka Brown 273 

Juanita Brown 273 

Laura Brown 273 

Lori Brown 273 

Ren Brown 273 

Rene Brown 273 

Riva Brown 273 

Steven Brown 273 

Tomeka Brown 273 

Wade Brown 273 

Willa Brown 273 

Justina Browning 273 

Jennifer Bruce 273 

Aimee Brumfield 273 

Gary Brumfield 273 
Mary Brumfield 273 

Todd Buchanan 184 

Stephanie Bruton 142 

Todd Buckley 273 
Richard Buckman 180 

Jeannie Buckner 273 
Phillip Buckner 170 
Ray Buckner 273 
Tommv Buell 174 
Tricia Buell 152 
Laura Buhler 273 
Chris Bulger 174 
Elizabeth Bulland 273 
Michael Bullard 184 
LaMonica Bullock 273 
Laura Bullock 176 



320 Index 



Lisa Bullock 273 
Jeff Bultman 180 
Gina Bunlyn 273 
Staccy Buras 273 
Ira Burdine 273 
Yvette Burdon 142 
Bobby Burge 160 
Robert Burgc 273 
David Burgess 164 
Scott Burgess 273 
Angela Burke 142 
David Burke 273 
Susan Burke 142 
Charlie Burks 273 
Christopher Burks 273 
Brigette Burlette 156, 273 
Lynn Burmaster 154 
Jay Burnell 160 
Cenovia Burnes 273 
Jeff Burns 188 
Stephanie Burns 273 
LaTonya Burnside 273 
John Burrell 166, 273 
Teresa Burrell 144 
Lee Burril 273 
Susan Burt 273 
Bryce Busche 273 
Amy Bush 152, 273 
David Bush 186 
Julie Bush 152 
Tommi Bush 273 
Sandra Butler 273 
Kevin Byars 273 
Brad Bynum 186 
Dawn Bynum 273 
Kim Bynum 152 
Lela Bynum 273 
Kevin Byram 164 
Jenean Byrd 273 
Stacy Byrd 170 
Tandis Byrd 273 



Lisa Cade 152 
Susan Cade 152 
Stephanie Cage 142 
Leonard Cahoune 273 
Hank Cain 164 
Susan Caine 156 
Kim Calametti 154 
Angela Calder 274 
Lynn Calder 274 
Joseph Cameron Jr. 274 
Julie Cameron 274 
Nancy Cameron 274 
Anthony Campbell 274 
Janice Campbell 274 
Kimalon Campbell 274 
Rebecca Campbell 274 
Sherrie Campbell 154 
Tamanaca Campbell 274 
Yolanda Campbell 274 
Esther Canabal 274 
Rafael Canabal 274 
Laura Canada 162, 274 
Susan Cangemi 274 
Cleatonia Cannon 274 
Andrea Canon 178 
Jason Canonici 150 
Dana Capps 176 
Hristian Carabulea 274 
Joseph Carbery 274 
Laura Carlisle 152 
Neely Carlton 178 
Malcolm Carmichael 184 
John Carney 170 
Keith Carrico 174 
Henry Carroll 274 
Lisa Carroll 274 
Shannon Carson 274 
Sharon Carson 162, 274 
Ashley Cartee 152 
Kelli Cartee 152, 274 
Allen Carter 184 
Carla Carter 156, 274 
Catherine Carter 274 
Christine Carter 274 



Cindy Carter 1 56 
Dana Carter 1 76 
David Carter 184 
LaFrance Carter 274 
Sharon Carter 274 
Tori Lynn Carter 178 
Trena Carter 274 
Sammy Carver I 80 
Tracey Carver 154 
Virginia Cascio 274 
Sean Casey 1 80 
Kamala Cassidy 176 
Kelli Cassidy 176 
Kim Castle 176 
Chantell Caughman 176 
Vicki Caylor 274 
Heather Celoria 274 
Bob Chain 184 
Mona Chambers 148, 274 
Chad Chambliss 150 
Shannon Chancelor 154 
Billy Chancellor 274 
Kimberly Chancelor 274 
Carolyn Chapman 274 
Gretchen Chapman 152 
Johnny Chapman 274 
Christy Chappie 156, 274 
Kwokfai Cheng 274 
Pamela Cheung 274 
Nita Chilton 274 
Wayne Chisholm 274 
Eugene Christen III 274 
Lori Christensen 274 
Gerald Christian 166, 274 
Thomas Christian 188 
Horace Chui 274 
Brett Clark 274 
Chris Clark 174 
Ella Clark 274 
Helene Clark 274 
Judith Clark 274 
Kimberly Clark 176, 274 
Lana Clark 274 
Laura Clark 154 
Michelle Clark 275 
Samuel Clark 172 
Shannon Clark 275 
Sharon Clark 275 
Tomeka Clark 275 
Vincent Clark 275 
Tamela Clayborne 275 
Kenneth Clayton 275 
Christi Clements 275 
Wendy Clemons 178 
Angie Clepper 154 
Jane Cleveland 156 
Michael Cleveland 275 
Dana Clolinger 275 
Linda Cobb 178 
Chris Cogswell 170 
Dale Coker 275 
Stacy Coker 275 
Jeff Cole 188 
Bethaney Coleman 275 
Leslie Coleman 276 
Monica Coleman 276 
Sharon Coleman 276 
Sherd Coleman 276 
James Colgan 276 
Natalie Colle 156, 276 
Kelly Collins 152 
Scott Collins 276 
Christopher Colomb 276 
Sherry Colson 154 
Caryn Comans 276 
James Commagere 180 
Christy Cook 176 
Gregory Cook 276 
Jocelyn Cook 276 
Matt Cook 276 
Tracey Cook 276 
Cajun Cool 276 
Joseph Coole 276 
Monica Cooley 276 
Stephanie Cooley 276 
Wanda Cooley 276 
April Cooper 156, 276 
Catherine Cooper 276 
Ken Cooper 186 



1990 Bancroft Prize 



Dr. Neil R.McMillen, a Uni- 
versity of Southern Mississippi 
history professor, was awarded 
one of the two 1990 Bancroft 
Prizes in American history on 
April 4. 

The prize was given by Co- 
lumbia University's President 
Michael Isovern on the univer- 
sity's campus in New York 
City. 

The prize, along with a 
$4,000 cash award, was pre- 



sented to McMillen for his 
book, DARK JOURNEY: 
BLACK MISSISSIPPIANS 
IN THE AGE OF JIM 

CROW. The book took a dec- 
ade to complete and chronicles 
the struggle of blacks under 
white domination and segrega- 
tion from the time of recon- 
struction to the beginning of the 
Civil Rights Movement. || By 
Kim Walsh 




A (Above) Dr. Neil R. McMillen with his award winning book was the recipi- 
ent of the Bancroft Prize. 



Index 321 



Kevin Cooper 186 

Pat Cooper 184 

Sherri Cooper 152 

Stacey Cooper 152 

Subrina Cooper 276 

Kyle Copeland 170 

Valerie Corley 276 

Christi Corona 178 

Janelle Correjolles 176 

Hope Corso 168, 276 

Vanessa Cosby 276 

Tiernei Cosey 276 

Ludmila Cosio 276 

Candie Cospelich 142 

Mike Cosse 188 

Deborah Cothern 276 

Milacey Cotton 

Julie Cottrell 152 

Lori Counts 142 

Missy Covington 162 

Beverly Cowan 276 

Vincent Cowan 276 

Jennifer Cowart 148, 276 

Thomas Conerly 276 

Catherine Cox 176 

Damon Cox 186 

Deandrea Cox 

Kayla Cox 168, 276 

Rob Cox 276 

Greg Craddock 184 
Stacey Craft 162, 276 
Stephanie Crampton 176 

Buddy Crawford 276 

Christy Crawford 276 

Kelly Crawford 142 

Tracey Crawford 276 

Bob Creech 188 

Kena Creel 276 

Tony Creel 186 

Tynia Crews 168, 276 

Wes Crider 186 

Jim Criss 170 

Kimberly Crook 276 

Ava Crosby 276 

Christie Crosby 276 

Kevin Crosier 180 

Timothy Crotwell 276 

Tiffany Crow 142 

Lucious Crowe II 276 

Robert Crozier 180 

Del Crum 160, 276 

Sean Crum 150 

Richard Cudd Jr. 276 

Darryl Cuevas 276 

David Cuevas 184 

Lori Cuevas 276 

Ray Cuevas 188 

Beth Culpepper 178 

Stephanie Cummings 276 

Jennifer Cunningham 142, 276 

Bryan Cupit 278 

Brenda Currie 152 

Karen Currie 278 

Aprile Curry 152 

Chad Curry 174 

Jesse Curry 278 

Sheri Curry 278 

Sonya Curry 278 

Claudia Curtis 278 

Joseph Curtiss 278 



D 



Roxanne Dagino 278 
Keri Dahl 278 
Gretchen Daigle 278 
Keith Dale 160 
Selena Dalton 278 
Laura Daman 162, 278 
Ashley Daniel 278 
Dessie Daniel 278 
Heather Daniel 278 
Chad Daniels 150 
Darla Daniels 152 
Eric Daniels 150 
Gary Daniels 278 
Keith Dannewitz 278 
Dawn Darby 278 



Celena Darden 278 
Kurt Dau 278 
Meghan Daugharty 178 
Shelley Daughdrill 152, 278 
Mary Davenport 156, 278 
Christy Davidson 178 
Chuck Davidson 170 
Diane Davidson 152, 278 
Alison Davis 278 
Andrew Davis 174 
Angel Davis 278 
Billie Davis 278 
Chuck Davis 174 
Dania Davis 156 
DeAnna Davis 156, 278 
Deanna Davis 278 
Frances Davis 178 
Linda Davis 278 
Lisa Davis 154, 278 
Mandi Davis 178 
Natalie Davis 278 
Rachel Davis 278 
Ron Davis 278 
Sara Davis 278 
Shajuanda Davis 278 
Sheila Davis 278 
Tonya Davis 278 
Veronica Davis 278 
Kimberly Davison 162, 278 
Glyn Day 184 
Laura Day 278 
Mark Deakle 170 
Kim Deal 278 
Darlene Dean 278 
Jeremy Dearman 278 
Sharon DeBerry 278 
Eldridge Dedeaux 278 
Roslyn Dedeaux 278 
Valencia Dedeaux 278 
Angela Deer 144, 278 
Sally Dees 176 
Jennifer DeJean 278 
Donna Delmas 278 
Susan Delmas 278 
China Doll Delta 319 
Marcy DeMahy 178, 278 
Michelle Dement 156 
Lonn DeMoss 186 
Thomas DeMoss 279 
Beth Denham 142 
Mary Denton 279 
Audacious Deuce 147, 319 
Shannon Devall 184 
Jennifer Dewalt 279 
Henry Dick 180 
Dennis Dickerson 279 
Rebecca Dickenson 279 
Patton Dickson 170 
Ken DiFatta 184 
Lauren Dill 142 
Siren Dillon 279 
Herbert Dimpoli 164 
Jennifer Dirden 279 
Andrea Dittmar 279 
Gregory Divinity 279 
Angela Dixon 279 
Sally Dixon 279 
Sandra Dixon 279 
Scott Dixon 180 
David Dobie 180 
Naomi Dobson 279 
Dana Dockens 279 
Brian Dodd 279 
Tracy Doebler 279 
John Doering 164 
Daniel Doherty 164 
Denise Dokey 279 
Gino Dollars 279 
Tina Dollars 279 
Hector Dominguez 279 
Tori Dominguez 152 
Douglas Donahue 164 
Melissa Donald 279 
Johnny Donaldson 279 
Ronald Donegan 174 
Angela Donley 279 
Chuck Donlin 184 
Robert Donnell 186 



Traci Doody 176, 279 
Daniel Dorion 279 
Amy Dorr 279 
David Dorrill 180 
Jett Dorsett 279 
Lisa Dortch 279 
Robert Doss 279 
Sandra Dotson 279 
Ceci Douglas 154 
Cecilia Douglass 279 
Ada Downing 279 
James Downs 184 
Tiffany Downs 279 
Jamie Doyle 184 
Lisa Drake 279 
Ruth Drake 279 
Tara Derher 279 
Tommy Drew 182 
Rachel Driskel 152 
Angela Drummond 279 
Susan Dryden 178 
Stephanie DuBose 279 
Alan Dubuisson 279 
Matt Dudley 182 
Shannon Dudley 156 
John Duease 150 
Karen Duffie 156, 279 
Sonja Dufrene 279 
Julie Duggan 279 
Erin Dukes 156 
Jerry Dukes 279 
Sean Dunaway 279 
Yolanda Dunbar 144, 279 
Christina Duncan 148, 279 
Clinton Duncan 279 
James Duncan III 170, 279 
Ric Duncan 180 
Tunjia Duncan 279 
Steven Dunn 279 
Jason Dunnam 184 
Jennifer Dupont 279 
Marcel Dupree 180 
Michael Dupuy 279 
Leroy Duvall 180 
Nathaniel Dyer 279 



E 



Michelle Eagle 279 
Chuck Earnest 174 
Kristie Easterling 280 
Terry Easterling 170 
Lane Eastland 154 
Christopher Eaton 174 
Andy Eaves 154 
Ron Eckert 174 
Rebecca Edens 280 
James Edwards 180 
Yolanda Egland 144, 280 
Steven Eick 280 
Stephanie Eiland 156, 280 
Heidi Eisler 280 
Vince Elchos 280 
Benton Elliott 180 
Teresah Elliott 176 
Cherlyn Elliott 168, 280 
Brita Ellis 154 
Jessica Ellis 168, 280 
Mark Ellis 280 
Joanne Ellzey 156 
Christian Engle 170 
Jonathan English 164 
Denise Epps 280 
Debby Escher 152 
Nancy Eshenbaugh 280 
Shellye Espey 280 
Jeffery Etheridge 280 
Carl Evans 280 
Howard Evans 280 
Kim Evans 280 
Kristin Evans 280 
Mable Evans 280 
Shane Evans 150 
Sheila Evans 280 
Thomas Evans 188 
Tracey Evans 280 
Kerrie Everett 280 
Pamela Everett 280 



Stephanie Ewing 280 
Lisa Ezell 280 
Vicky Ezell 152 



Colleen Fabacher 178, 280 
Geoff Fairchild 174 
Tonyia Fairley 158, 280 
Chantal Famularo 280 
Chris Farish 160, 280 
Kim Farmer 156, 280 
Stephen Farmer 280 
Tracy Farrior 142 
John Faught 280 
Marshall Fayard 180 
Laurie Felder 280 
Vicki Felker 154 
Cassandra Felton 280 
Mary Fenech 280 
Angie Fennell 156 
Melissa Fennell 156 
Vicki Fennell 280 
Kirk Fenton 280 
James Fenton 280 
George Ferguson 184 
Priscilla Ferguson 280 
Chris Feroben 186 
Edna Fernandez 280 
Bobby Fink 184 
Kimberly Firley 280 
Angela Fisher 168, 280 
Belinda Fisher 280 
Bradley Fisher 186, 280 
Gene Fitts 184 
Martin Fitts 280 
Bradley Fitzgerald 280 
Andrea Fleming 142 
Alex Flowers 152 
Larry Flowers 280 
Adrian Floyd 280 
Angela Floyd 280 
Shannan Floyd 280 
Wendy Floyd 280 
Lori Flynt 280 
Kevin Foley 154 
James Folks 160, 280 
Andrew Folse 186 
Roger Folse 282 
Ted Forbes 184 
Matt Forbish 186 
Amy Ford 282 
Daniel Ford 282 
Dannette Ford 162, 282 
Michael Ford 282 
Shank Ford 282 
Teresa Ford 282 
Elizabeth Forehand 282 
Conni Forte 162, 282 
Daniel Forte 174 
Rick Forte 164 
Damon Fortenberry 174 
Sheila Fortenberry 282 
Angelia Foster 282 
George Foster 174 
Joseph Foster 174 
Susan Foster 176, 282 
Bernita Fountain 282 
Donna Fox 156, 282 
Leslie Fox 282 
Natalie Fox 162, 282 
Juan Franco 282 
Cynthia Franklin 282 
Lajoyce Franklin 282 
Tayna Franklin 282 
Jasmene Frazier 282 
Mark Frazier 170 
William Frazier 282 
Tracie Freed 282 
Angela Freeman 282 
Shannon Freeman 282 
Angela Freibert 282 
Michael French 172, 282 
Doug Fridge 150 
Troy Frisbie 282 
Lisa Frish 178 
Hillary Fry 168, 282 
Yvonne Fry 282 



322 Index 



Philip Frye 150 
Richard Frye 150 
Holly Fulton 282 
Stefanic Fulton 178 
William Fulton 170 
Laura Furman 178, 282 
Jeff Furniss 170 



G 



Mercedes Gabourel 282 
Stephanie Gale 282 
Tricia Gale 282 
Skip Gallagher 182 
Kim Gallaspy 154 
Judith Gallegos 282 
Karen Gaylon 282 
Danny Games 282 
Carolyn Gandy 282 
Christi Gandy 282 
Christy Gandy 168, 282 
Cindy Gandy 168, 282 
Ann Garanich 282 
David Gardecki 174 
Alison Gardner 142 
Lisa Gardiner 282 
Jennifer Gardner 282 
Lorri Gardner 282 
Brenda Gardner 176 
Gregory Garner 282 
Jennifer Garner 178, 282 
Cathy Garnett 178 
Natalie Garnett 178 
Brigette Garringer 178 
Shelli Gary 178 
Latouisha Gasaway 158, 282 
Heather Gaskin 156, 282 
David Gatlin 282 
Jon Gazzo 180 
Michelle Geddis 178 
Tonya Gee 282 
Amy Gendusa 154 
Jay Gentry 174 
Sean George 160, 282 
Patricia Gerald 282 
Michael German II 284 
Imad Ghoussoub 284 
Cynthia Gibson 284 
Todd Gibson 180 
Anthony Giegler 284 
Kimberly Gilbert 168, 284 
Jennifer Giles 284 
Michael Giles 186 
Mike Giles 180 
Tracey Giles 284 
Patrick Gill 284 
Jodie Gillespie 
Laura Gillis 152 
Ryan Gilner 284 
John Ginn 184 
Kelly Gipson 178 
Kimberly Givens 284 
John Glass 284 
Griff Gleason 174 
Alicia Glover 162 
Almetrius Goff 284 
Christy Goff 284 
Joel Goff 284 
Sheri Golden 154 
Ima Goober 284 
Uri Goober 284 
Jeremy Gooden 284 
Libby Goodwin 284 
Lisa Goodwin 144 
Ameena Gordon 284 
Corey Gordon 284 
Matt Gordon 160, 284 
Preston Gordon 284 
Terri Gordon 284 
Tricia Gore 168, 284 
Lori Gould 142 
Jean Gouzy 284 
Missy Gowen 168, 284 
Felicia Graham 284 
Jodie Graham 162, 284 
Michael Graham 170 
Tina Graham 156, 284 
Nina Grafton 284 



Lisa Grant 284 

Carolyn Graves 284 

Latrina Graves 284 

Misty Graves 284 

Calvin Gray 284 

Christi Gray 150, 284 

Fleasha Gray 284 

Jeffery Gray 284 

Jonathan Gray 284 

Kim Gray 168, 284 

Laura Gray 176 

Michelle Gray 284 

Regell Gray 284 

Wanda Gray 284 

David Green 284 

Genny Green 176, 284 

Janice Green 284 

Tisha Green 284 

Vernon Green Jr. 284 

Scott Greene 170 

Stacey Greene 184 

Wendell Greene 186 

Jennifer Greer 284 

Kyle Greer 184 

Zenja Greer 284 

Kristi Gregg 284 

Kim Gregoire 284 

Jeannine Gremillion 156, 284 

Lance Gremillion 188 

Tammy Gremillion 178 

Hollie Grey 156, 285 

Aldoria Griffin 285 

Donnis Griffin 285 

Kevin Griffin 1 50 

LaVada Griffin 285 

Shana Griffin 285 

Victoria Griffin 285 

Judith Griffis 285 

Pat Griffith 180 

Tommy Griffith 180 

Sandra Griffiths 285 

Susan Grigg 168 

Valeria Grim 285 

Ortie Grinnell 285 

Jennifer Grissom 154 

Robert Groeneveld 1 50 

Leslee Grubbs 285 

Laura Grunig 168 

Holly Gubert 285 

Audrey Gully 285 

Lori Guillot 168 

Jennifer Guin 285 

Julie Guintard 285 

Ava Gunn 285 

Miki Guthrie 168 

Marlene Gutierrez 285 



H 



Chuck Haaga 150 
Marc Haarala 186 
Timothy Haas 160, 285 
Melissa Haddad 285 
Joseph Haddon III 285 
Paul Hagelston 285 
Mark Halderman 182 
Harold Hale 184 
Chevelle Hall 285 
Deron Hall 285 
Regina Hall 285 
Scott Hall 186 
Sherri Hall 156, 285 
Stacey Hall 285 
Terri Hall 156, 285 
Vincent Hall 285 
J. T. Haltom 151 
Hilda Ham 285 
Keyla Hamilton 285 
Leah Hamilton 285 
Lori Hamilton 285 
Tonya Hamilton 144, 285 
Heath Hamm 180 
Patricia Hammett 185 
Joel Hammond 285 
Lesa Hammond 285 
Michelle Hammond 285 
Rick Hammond 285 
Shandi Hammond 285 



OMEGA PSI PHI 



Omega Psi Phi Fraternity 
Inc. was founded November 17, 
1911 on the campus of Howard 
University. In the Spring of 
1975, Nu Eta Chapter was 
chartered on USM's campus. 
The notorious charter line Gen- 
esis 31 later provided for the 
membership of college men 
with similar ideas to promote 



the national principles of man- 
hood, scholarship and persever- 
ance. The "Ques," as members 
are familiarly known, hold the 
colors of purple as the highest 
and gold as the purest. A social 
service fraternity, the men of 
Omega strive to ensure that the 
strengths of their four founding 
fathers will live on. 




; **P^^ 



Index 323 



Velecia Hampton 285 

Angela Hancock 176 

Doug Hancock 186 

Jeff Hankleroad 285 

Kelley Hanley 285 

Sheryl Hansen 156 

Kathryn Hanson 156, 285 

Leigh Harber 285 

Elizabeth Harding 156, 285 

Eric Hardy 285 

Rachon Hardy 285 

Joe Hargett 285 

George Harne 285 

Jeff Harper 170 

Veronica Harper 285 

Joey Harrington 168, 285 

Kelly Harrington 184 

Andrea Harris 285 

Deanna Harris 286 

Dionne Harris 286 

Felicia Harris 286 

Jon Harris 174 

Karen Harris 286 

Katrina Harris 286 

Keith Harris 184 

Kristy Harris 286 

Charla Harrison 286 

Chett Harrison 286 

Erin Harrison 176 

Lori Harrison 154, 286 

Marvin Hart 286 

Roderick Hart 286 

Brett Hartdegan 150 

Diane Hartzler 286 

Robin Hartzog 286 

Steven Hartzog 184 

Melissa Harvill 154 

Sandra Harworth 162, 286 

Kathy Haskew 286 

Jennifer Hassell 178 

David Hastings 286 

Steven Hastings 146, 286 

Eric Hatcher 286 

Andy Hauptman 150 

Ginger Havard 154 

John Havard 184 

Vince Havard 184 

Beth Hawkins 168, 286 

Julie Hawkins 286 

Harriet Hawthorne 158, 286 

David Hayes 150 

Tammie Hayes 286 

Deanne Haynes 286 

John Hazelton 286 

Blake Headley 170 

Elizabeth Heard 152 

Katherine Heard 286 

Stacy Heard 286 

Chad Hebert 180, 286 

Gary Hebler 286 

Michelle Hedgecoth 178 

Heather Hedgepeth 176 

Susan Heiden 286 

Vangi Hein 286 

Satronia Heisser 286 
Michelle Hellard 162, 286 

Stacey Hellen 168, 286 

Scott Hemeter 286 

Carol Hemphill 286 
Jennifer Henderson 286 
Wanda Henderson 286 
Stacey Henley 152 
Blythe Hennessey 286 
James Hennessey 286 
Twyla Henry 286 
Beverly Henshaw 286 
Paul Hernandez 286 
Laura Herrin 176 
Brian Herrington 170, 286 
Lisa Herrington 286 
Mark Herrington 186 
Stephanie Herrington 286 
Peter Hesketh 286 
Heidi Hester 286 
Michael Hewes 174 
Lara Hcyliger 168, 286 
Lawrence Hicks 164 
Fredrick Hickmon 286 
Carol High 286 



Angie Hill 176 
Barton Hill 286 
Geneann Hill 286 
Javannah Hill 286 
Jeffery Hill 286 
Joycelyn Hill 286 
Lisa Hill 156, 288 
Michelle Hill 178 
Charles Hillman 288 
Monica Lynn Hillman 152 
Clayton Hilton 288 
Clay Hilton 184 
Kelvin Hinton 288 
Migai Hinton 288 
Sharon Hinton 288 
Tracy Hinton 154 
Elizabeth Hipshier 288 
Dina Hitt 142 
Pamela Hobbs 288 
Carlton Hobgood 174 
Stacey Hobgood 288 
Jonathan Hodge 150 
Heidi Hodson 288 
Tommy Hoffman 288 
Tracy Hoffmann 178, 288 
Michael Hogan 288 
Michelle Holden 176, 288 
Melissa Holder 168, 288 
Pamela Hollensbe 288 
Kimberly Hollingsworth 288 
Paul Holloway 170 
Shana Holloway 178 
Tonya Holloway 154 
Jennifer Holman 288 
Viktor Holmberg 288 
Lynn Holmes III 288 
David Hong 150 
Eric Hook 288 
Holly Hook 176, 288 
Kimberly Hooper 288 
Melissa Hooper 288 
Andrea Hopkins 162, 288 
Cheryl Hopkins 152 
Paula Horath 288 
Tommie Hosey 288 
Marc Hostetler 188 
Bill Hough 160, 288 
Jo Anne Howard 288 
Kasey Howard 160, 288 
LaCurga Howard 288 
Laura Howard 288 
Raquel Howard 288 
Vicki Howat 288 
Justine Howe 162, 288 
Cathy Howell 288 
Kevin Howell 186 
Mark Howell 150 
Mechelle Howell 288 
Sharon Howell 288 
Stephen Howell 186 
Susan Howell 288 
Theresa Hoyt 288 
Anna Huang 288 
Sophia Huang 288 
Anna Huber 154 
John Hubert 174 
Edward Huddleston 288 
Deborah Hudson 288 
Katherine Hudson 288 
Mona Hudson 162, 288 
Brooke Huey 288 
Renee Huey 152 
Bo Huffman 186, 288 
David Huffman 288 
Mark Hugel 288 
Carla Hughes 176 
Pamela Hughes 158, 288 
Clinton Hull 164 
Daphne Hull 288 
Kevin Hull 186 
Michael Hundscheid 164 
Natasha Hunt 288 
Carl Hunter 289 
Jeff Hunter 170 
Kimberly Hunter 289 
Michael Hunter 289 
Rosalind Hunter 289 
Stephanie Hunter 154 
George Hurst 150 



Shahadat Hussain 289 
Troy Hust 289 
Freda Hutcherson 289 
Yolanda Hutchins 158, 289 
Blaire Hutchison 180 
Shana Hutto 168, 289 
Angela Hyde 289 



Stephen Ice 289 
Laura Ingram 178 
Missy Ingram 152 
Geoffrey Ireland 289 
Debora Irwin 162, 289 
Rhonda Isaac 289 
Suzi Isely 290 
Tony Isensee 164 
Chip Ivey 290 



Jennifer Jack 290 
Becky Jackson 290 
Carl Jackson 290 
Linda Jackson 290 
Monica Jackson 290 
Sam Jackson 150 
Sonja Jackson 290 
Stacy Jackson 290 
William Jackson 290 
John Jacobs 160, 290 
Anita Jacobs 290 
Beth James 156 
Deborah James 290 
Dexter James 290 
Doy James 290 
Gwendolyn James 290 
Jaquatte James 290 
Julianna James 290 
David Jarnagin 290 
Jean Jarrell 290 
Jennifer Jarrell 156 
Terry Jarrell 290 
Don Jefcoat 290 
Janice Jeffery 290 
Donald Jenkins 290 
Kawanna Jenkins 290 
Rod Jenkins 286 
Stan Jenkins 290 
William Jenkins 290 
Rex Jenks 186 
Susanne Jensen 290 
Michelle Jerome 156, 290 
Rachel Jerome 290 
Parish Jewell 188 
Felicia Jimerson 290 
Corey Johns 290 
Adrienne Johnson 144, 290 
Amanda Johnson 142 
Amy Johnson 178, 290 
Angela Johnson 178, 290 
Aubrey Johnson 290 
Byron Johnson 290 
Cornelia Johnson 290 
Chip Johnson 290 
Erik Johnson 180 
Evelyn Johnson 290 
Felicia Johnson 290 
Guy Johnson 290 
J. Johnson 164 
Jacqueline Johnson 290 
Jennifer Johnson 290 
Jerry Johnson 290 
John Johnson 290 
Judith Johnson 290 
Kimberly Johnson 290 
Kris Johnson 174 
LaGrena Johnson 290 
Mandy Johnson 182 
Michael Johnson 290 
Monica Johnson 290 
Pamela Johnson 290 
Patina Johnson 290 
Patrina Johnson 290 
Retina Johnson 291 
Rhoma Johnson 158 
Richard Johnson 1 84 



Robert Johnson 172, 291 
Robert Johnson 291 
Sharon Johnson 291 
Terri Johnson 162 
Tonya Johnson 291 
Vanessa Johnson 291 
Donald Johnston 291 
Adriane Jones 158, 291 
Barbara Jones 142 
Amy Jones 291 
Bart Jones 186 
Beverly Jones 291 
Bubba Jones 186 
Charles Jones 150, 291 
Christopher Jones 291 
Freddie Mae Jones 158, 291 
Gary Jones 182 
Gene Jones 291 
Gregory Jones 291 
Judy Jones 156, 291 
Julie Jones 152 
Kimberly Jones 291 
Lajuan Jones 291 
Linda Jones 291 
Marcia Jones 291 
Pattie Jones 291 
Rhonda Jones 291 
Scott Jones 291 
Shelley Jones 156 
Ventez Jones 291 
Wynde Jones 156 
Jeff Jordan 170 
Alice Joseph 291 
Sharyn Joy 291 
Twylla Joyner 291 
Kristy Jussely 152 



K 



Brian Kalzmarek 291 
Joseph Kakaveka 291 
Skipper Kalil 291 
Robert Kalka 160, 291 
Karen Kane 291 
Jon Kaufman 291 
John Kavanaugh 170 
Lisa Kazelskis 291 
Tyler Kean 184 
Rickey Keith 291 
Stephanie Keith 178, 291 
Barbara Kelley 291 
Joy Kelley 291 
Angela Kelly 291 
Clarissa Kelly 291 
Theresa Kelly 291 
William Kelly 170 
Katherine Kemp 152 
LaWanda Kennebrew 291 
Michael Kennedy 150, 291 
Noelle Kennedy 176 
Stephanie Kennedy 291 
William Kennedy 291 
Larry Kennon 170 
Karen Kerr 291 
Michelle Kerstine 156, 291 
Robbie Kesler 291 
Kristi Key 176 
Kenneth Keys 291 
Randy Khalaf 291 
Linda Kinard 154 
John Kinberg 291 
Shalandria Kincaid 291 
Burman King III 292 
Janice King 292 
Phalesha King 
Valarie King 168 
William King 170 
Kerri Kingston 292 
Kristine Kinna 292 
Charles Kirkland 292 
Keisha Kirkland 292 
Michael Kirkland 292 
Stacey Kirkland 292 
Kevin Kiser 180 
Leigh Kitchens 152 
Jonathan Kittrell 292 
Kristin Klusendorf 152, 292 
Kurt Knesel 180 
Todd Knesel 150 



324 Index 



Amy Knight 152 
Havon Knight 292 
Heather Knight 292 
K. K. Knight 150 
Tamela Knight 292 
Susan Knoess 162, 292 
Kathryn Koeppel 168, 292 
Lisa Kokinda 292 
Eric Kolin 182 
Audrea Kool-Aid 292 
Charlene Kool-Aid 292 
Sharon Kool-aid 292 
Steve Komp 150 
Francie Koniak 156 
Chris Koonce 1 70 
Michele Korczak 162, 292 
David Kostmayer 150, 292 
Sasaki Kotomi 292 
Marian Krishack 292 
David Kronlage 184 
Marc Kubicki 180 
Eulema Kuhlmann 292 
Rebecca Kullmer 292 
Conti Kun 292 
Justin Kuykendall 292 
Georgianna Kwan 292 
Kermit Kwan 292 



William Lack 174 
Jennifer Lackey 292 
Kirby Lackey 292 
Carolyn LaCroix 156, 292 
Desiree Ladner 292 
Michael Lafferty 184 
Tim LaFramboise 174 
James Lambert 292 
Laliece Lambert 292 
Elena La Nasa 292 
Sandy Lancaster 292 
Erin Landry 154, 292 
Veronica Landry 29 
Lisa Lang 294 
Mark Lang 294 
Melody Lang 294 
Sissy Lang 152 
Tisha Langpitt 162 
Shelley Langley 294 
Jeffrey Lansing 294 
Matt Largen 174 
Eric LaRosa 170 
Yolanda Larry 294 
Sharon Lanson 294 
Ray Lauga 188 
James Lawrence 180 
Phillip Lea 294 
Tim Leach 164 
Danna Leard 168, 294 
Robert Leard 170 
Ann Leaumont 156, 294 
David LeBlanc 150 
Debbie LeBlanc 156, 294 
Charlene LeBreton 154 
Kathy Lecky 154, 294 
Susie Lecky 154 
Patty LeCompte 294 
LaLisa Ledlow 294 
Catherine Lee 194 
Dumpi Lee 294 
Janice Lee 294 
Jennifer Lee 294 
Kelly Lee 184 
Paula Lee 294 
Tony Lee 172, 294 
Vicky Lee 156 
Lance Lefan 174 
Jeanette Lefler 294 
Victoria Leggett 294 
Dennis LeNoir 294 
Lisa Leonard 294 
Dana Lepre 150 
Melanie Lester 294 
Tobie Letlow 294 
Donna Lett 294 
Jay Leverette 170 
Farris Lewis 294 
Kellee Lewis 294 



Simone Lewis 294 
Deena Liberto 178 
Paul Libonate 180 
Faith Lifer 154 
Daniel Ligas 294 
Marketta Liggins 294 
Lynn Lightsey 176 
Linda Lilly 294 
Alfreda Lindsey 294 
Angie Lindsey 152 
David Lindsey 170 
Becky Lindsey 168, 294 
Bridget Linenberger 142 
Sean Linn I 74 
Steven Linton 150 
Sherry Lister 294 
Sandra Littell 294 
Catherine Little 294 
Fred Little 170 
Kimberly Little 294 
Sherry Little 168, 294 
Walter Littleton 294 
Cindy Livingston 294 
Keith Locke 294 
James Lockwood Jr. 164 
Denesia Lofton 294 
Karin Lofton 1 54, 294 
Steven Lofton 294 
Madeleine Loftus 294 
Chris Logan 186 
Dana Logue 294 
David Long 294 
Silenda Longino 294 
Gary Loper 182 
David Lopez 188 
Lei Lord 176 
Steven Loughlin 294 
Papa LoungeLach 295 
Elise Lovelace 176 
Chris Loveless 174 
Juliet Lovell 162 
John Lovett 295 
Amber Lowe 176, 295 
James Lowe 166, 295 
Scott Lowenberg 160, 295 
Tommy Lowery 186 
Kari Lubnow 154, 295 
Barbara Lucas 295 
Joyce Lucas 295 
Robbie Lucas 154 
Carla Luke 176 
Paul Luguet 164 
Sheila Lusher 295 
Erin Lusk 295 
Mary Lutton 162, 295 
Jennifer Lynn 152 
Joseph Lynn 184 
Melissa Lyon 178 
Sandi Lyon 154 
Darla Lyons 295 
Mark Lytle 295 



M 



Ken Macaro 170 
Michelle McKay 295 
Karen Mackey 295 
Denise Macko 295 
Mike Mader 170 
April Maddox 152 
Mark Maddox 295 
Alisa Madison 295 
Charlie Magee 295 
Elissa Magee 295 
Jimmy Magee 160 
Geoffery Magee 295 
Novie Magee 295 
Willie Magee III 295 
Jeff Mager 280 
Margaret Mahady 162 
Carl Major 295 
Butch Mallette 174 
Jeff Mallette 174 
Leigh Malone 295 
Nancy Malone 295 
Rhonda Malone 295 
Billie Malsbury 295 
Melissa Manby 162, 295 



Foreign Fest 
Melting Pot 



The University of Southern 
Mississippi's 1990 annua! Melt- 
ing Pot Festival was again suc- 
cessful this year. Sponsored by 
the English Language Institute, 
it offered students and people 
from the community the opportu- 
nity to learn about different cul- 
tures. 

The festival this year featured 



an Indian stick dance, an interna- 
tional fashion show, folklore 
dances from Latin America, food 
and handicrafts from various 
countries and displays of cos- 
tumes from all over the world. 
Participants also enjoyed the mu- 
sic and songs of Mexico, El Sal- 
vador, Thailand, China, India 
and many other countries. 




A (Above) Students were able to 
view an exhibit of a costume of the 
Far East worn by the children of 
that country. -^ (Left) USM stu- 
dents perform the Indian stick 
dance. 



Index 325 



Leigh Manly 295 

Donna Manning 295 

Robert Manning 295 

Krystal Mansfield 295 

Earnest Manuel Jr. 295 

Carole Maples 142 

Jacquelyn Mapp 168, 295 

Randi Marchand 168, 295 

Joseph Mardis 170, 295 

Sarita Mark 158, 295 

Jimmy Marlowe 184 

Donald Marshall 295 

Elaine Marston 295 

Mary Martello 295 

Aidra Martin 295 

Billy Martin 295 

Charles Martin 295 

Jody Martin 186, 295 

Laura Martin 156 

Mike Martin 184 

Pamela Martin 295 

Patty Martin 295 

Ronald Martin 164 

Jolene Martinez 295 

Susan Massengale 162, 295 

Constance Massey 295 

Krystal Massey 154 

Mark Mathis 295 

John Matthews 180 

Mary Matthews 296 

James Maxell 296 

Marsha Maxey 296 

Chuck Maxie 164 

Shannon Maxie 168, 296 

James May 296 

Tammy May 178 

Cornelius Mayfield 296 

Margaret Maziarz 296 

Bambi McBrayer 296 

Michelle McCall 156, 296 

Jeanne McCarthy 154 

Sara McCarthy 154 

Sean McCarthy 296 

Susan McCarthy 154 

Lisa McCarty 296 

Morgan McCarty 186 

Kevin McCaskey 171, 296 

Traci McCaskill 158, 296 

Vincent McCaskill 296 

Eric McCaslin 180 

Scott McClellan 174 

Tanya McClellan 296 

Ramona McCollum 296 

Rich McCord 296 

Robert McCreary 186 

Melanie McCrory 156 

Theda McCrory 296 

Valisa McCrory 296 

Lan McCulloch 156, 296 
Lillie McCullum 296 
Shasta McCurdy 296 
Alicia McDaniel 152 
Gary McDaniel 174 
Jana McDaniel 286 
Willie McDey 296 
Hugh McDonald 164 
Julie McDonald 154 
Kevin McDonald 150, 296 
Roger McDonald 296 
Susan McDonald 296 
Reuben McDowell 296 
Lynn McDown 296 
Robert McElhaney 164 
Michelle McElroy 296 
LaSandra McFarland 296 
Vivian McFarland 158 
Gary McGhee 296 
James McGhee 296 
Mary McGee 296 
Sean McGee 186, 296 
Jack McGill 184 
Jeff McGill 180 
Jennifer McGlothlin 168, 296 
Joan McGrew 296 
Kelvin McGruder 296 
Valerie McGuirc 296 
Stacey Mcllwain 152 
Debbie Mclnnis 176 
William Mclntirc 296 



Becky McKay 154 
Mary McKay 296 
Rebecca McKay 296 
Shownie McKay 296 
Brian McKee 296 
Heather McKee 156, 296 
Pam McKee 152 
Sharlet McKennis 296 
Buffy McKenzie 296 
Elizabeth McKenzie 296 
Gay McKenzie 296 
Kerry McKenzie 296 
Wonda McKie 296 
Regina McKinney 296 
Patrick McKinnis 174 
Scott McLain 170 
Sammy McLaurin 184 
Edward McLellan 296 
Christy McLemore 1 54, 298 
Louis McLendon 298 
Victor McLendon 298 
Tonya McMillan 298 
Jennifer McMinn 176, 298 
Delores McNair 298 
Krystal McNair 298 
Carla McNally 298 
Scott McNally 150, 298 
Kemmie McNeese 298 
Kenton McNeese 186 
Michael McNeese 170 
Scott McNeill 160, 298 
Mona McPhail 298 
Tracey McPhearson 176 
Casey McVea 1 50 
Kimberly Meador 298 
Richard Meadows 298 
Steven Meadows 298 
Toni Meadows 298 
Jay Medley 174 
Jay Meeks 150 
Stoney Meeks 298 
Lana Melvin 178 
Glen Merritt 298 
Sue Meurer 148, 298 
Melissa Meyer 176 
Janet Meyers 142 
Jason Meyers 298 
Kaye Meyers 298 
Julie Middlebusher 298 
Don Middleton 150 
Kristin Middleton 168, 298 
Tammy Middleton 298 
William Middleton 298 
Jesse Migues 184 
Cedric Miles 298 
Deanna Miles 180 
Melody Miles 298 
Traci Miles 152 
Conrad Miller 152 
Janet Miller 162, 298 
Jody Miller 298 
Kristen Miller 152 
Molly Miller 152 
Yolanda Miller 158, 298 
Jeffrey Mills 298 
Jennifer Mills 154 
Kimberly Mills 162, 298 
Kelly Milton 298 
Victoria Mims 298 
Kendra Mingo 298 
Allan Misner 298 
Donn Mitchell 150 
Jeffrey Mitchell 164 
John Mitchell 174 
Kyle Mitchell 150 
Meredith Mitchell 156, 298 
Sean Mitchell 180 
Stephen Mitchell 298 
Jason Moak 184 
Jim Moak 186 
Krista Moak 298 
Pete Moak 174 
Janet Mobley 298 
Chandra Moffett 298 
Rex Mohon 298 
Christy Moncrief 298 
James Moniot 298 
Shelly Monteiro 162, 298 
Cynthia Montgomery 298 



Mandy Montgomery 176 
Mark Montgomery 298 
Chris Moody 150 
Dana Moody 298 
Kade Moody 180 
Jennifer Moody 168 
Tela Moody 168, 298 
Tonia Moody 298 
Zandra Moody 298 
Lynda Moon 162, 298 
Bobby Moore 172, 298 
Cathy Moore 299 
Danny Moore 164 
Jennifer Moore 299 
Jennifer Moore 144, 299 
Karen Moore 299 
Melanie Moore 178 
Michelle Moore 299 
Misty Moore 152, 299 
Octavia Moore 299 
Regina Moore 299 
Rita Moore 299 
Russell Moore 299 
T. Moore 299 
Virginia Moore 299 
Dale Moran 299 
Robin Moran 299 
Kimberly Morgan 142 
William Morgan 180 
Dana Morris 142 
Kinure Morris 299 
Laura Morris 299 
Sara Morris 156, 299 
Sheri Morris 299 
Stephanie Morris 299 
Carissa Morton 152 
Chase Moses 170 
Marc Moses 170 
Krista Mosk 156 
Anita Mosley 299 
Jackie Mosley 299 
Tammy Mosley 299 
Angie Moss 299 
Paul Moss 184 
Bryan Mott 188 
Julie Moulds 176 
Dark Moyle 299 
Jeffrey Moyle 188 
Ronnie Mozingo 299 
Eric Muench 180 
Melanie Mullen 176, 299 
Scott Mullen 174 
Leslie Munn 162, 299 
Patrice Murray 178 
Roslyn Murray 299 
Gavin Murrell 170 
Leslie Murrell 299 
Melissa Muzzy 178 
Scott Myatt 150 
Cynthia Myers 299 
Lori Myeles 299 
Charles Myrick 166, 299 
Lanardo Myrick 299 



N 



Laura Nations 154 
Darryl Neal 299 
Sandra Neal 299 
Scottie Neal 299 
Hope Necaise 178 
John Necaise 299 
Edward Needham 299 
Shea Neely 186 
Chantel Nelson 299 
Elizabeth Nelson 299 
Tiffany Nelson 299 
Tonya Nelson 299 
Jeff Nester 299 
Robert Netheny 170 
Scarlet Netterville 299 
Paul Nettles 184 
Raymond Nettles 299 
Fancy Newman 299 
Leslie Newton 299 
Jasmine-Thi Nguyen 299 
Karen Nichols 299 
Nikki Nicholson 299 



Tashia Nicholson 300 
Dean Nickens 300 
Jennifer Nicks 300 
Tonyua Nicks 300 
Katie Nix 300 
Hiroshi Noda 300 
Brigid Nodurft 300 
Christopher Nolan 300 
Natalie Noona 300 
Alice Norman 300 
Candace Norris 300 
Don Norris 174 
Ray Novack 174 
Gerald Nuckols 300 
Mickey Nunez 184 
Mike Nunnery 184 



o 



Samantha Oaks 300 
Amy O'Bannon 300 
Ponce Obregon 300 
Margaret O'Brien 162, 300 
Mary O'Brign 300 
Chuck O'Connor 300 
Terri O'Connor 300 
Jennifer Odom 300 
Vesheler Odom 300 
Lauren Oggs 156 
Jeanne O'Keefe 300 
Michelle Oliver 176 
Nancy Oliver 300 
Andrew O'Malley 300 
Omega member 300 
Yoland O'Neal 300 
Scott Openshaw 180 
Matthew Ord 180 
Nicole Orfanello 178 
Melinda Ory 168, 300 
Laura Osborne 300 
James Oswalt 300 
Chris Oubre 184 
Penny Overstreet 300 
Sabrina Owens 300 



Jennifer Pace 152 
Shelley Pace 176, 300 
Christy Paciera 178 
April Packer 300 
Juan Packer 300 
Rene Pagan 188 
Christine Page 300 
Elizabeth Page 300 
Heather Page 178 
Jennifer Paige 142 
Kentrell Paige 300 
LaMonica Paige 300 
Angela Pait 168, 300 
Anthony Palazzo 170, 300 
Frank Palazzo 186 
Thomas Panko 182 
Doy Palmer 300 
Susanne Papa 300 
Jason Parish 186 
Alan Parker 300 
Andrea Parker 162, 300 
Clark Parker 184 
David Parker 150 
Ginny Parker 300 
Greg Parker 184 
Jon Parker 150 
Kevin Parker 188 
Margaret Parker 176 
Michelle Parker 300 
Ronald Parker 172, 300 
Steven Parten 300 
Suzy Parkerson 300 
Timothy Parks 300 
John Parrish 164 
Tamara Parrish 176, 300 
Twinie Parson 300 
Annette Parsons 152 
Steven Parten 160 
Glen Partrick 150 



326 Index 



Archana Patel 300 
Melissa Patrick 158, 300 
Brian Patterson 180 
April Patton 144, 300 
Charra Patton 301 
Kent Pawlak 150 
Robert Payn 160, 301 
April Payne 156, 301 
Luis Paz 301 
Chris Pazos 150, 301 
Clayton Peacock 301 
Greg Peacock 301 
Levestcr Peacock 301 
Robert Pearson 182 
Eddie Peasant 301 
Lisa Peavy 301 
Lesley Peebles 154 
Traci Pellegrine 162 
Michael Pelts 301 
Jamie Peoples 184 
Johnny Peoples 184 
Jim Pennington 301 
James Penny Jr. 301 
Susan Penton 178, 302 
Sharon Pepper 302 
Danelle Perez 168, 302 
Phelix Perine 302 
Florence Perkins 302 
Jack Perniciaro 182 
Darryl Perry 182 
Kenneth Perry 302 
Steven Perry 302 
Torsha Perry 302 
Eric Peters 186 
Jennie Peters 302 
Lori Petersen 302 
Debbie Petro 142 
Willie Petro 302 
Latonia Pettis 302 
Valenta Petty 302 
Carol Peyton 302 
Earnie Pheal 302 
Jennifer Phifer 156, 302 
Matthew Phillion 182 
Kristen Phillips 152, 302 
Leslie Phillips 302 
Michael Phillips 188 
Steve Phillips 170 
Dara Pickering 302 
Amy Pickich 302 
Bob Pierce 1 86 
Greg Pierce 186 
Kenny Pierce 186 
Lisa Pigford 302 
Christopher Pigott 164 
Kristine Pike 154, 302 
Paul Pinkerton 170 
Kathryne Pinnix 168,1 302 
Margaret Pinson 152 
Brenda Pinter 302 
Billy Pipkin 302 
Tina Pipkins 156, 302 
Kelli Pique 302 
Allan Pirtle 302 
Dominick Pittari 302 
Jackie Pittman 302 
Marrcellus Pittman 302 
Stacie Pittman 154, 302 
Stephanie Pittman 178, 302 
Jeanne Pitts 142 
Raymond Pitts 302 
Michael Plankers 302 
Mike Plitt 184 
Robert Poirier 186 
William Polidore 150 
Theresa Polk 302 
Pamela Pollard 178 
Amy Ponder 142 
Ellen Poole 178 
Mary Poole 302 
William Poole 302 
Laura Poore 302 
Donald Pope 150 
Krista Pope 154 
Gary Proche 302 
Beth Potin 156 
Jennifer Potts 302 
Wendy Pouncey 152 
Troy Pounds 302 



Arleatha Powe 302 
Aaron Powell 302 
Albert Powell 302 
Allen Powell 302 
Alvin Powell 302 
Bonnie Powell 142 
Mark Powell 170 
Sandra Powell 302 
Scott Powell 174 
Lana Ray Powers 1 76 
John Prentiss 302 
Dane Prestridge 152, 302 
Kim Price 302 
Michelle Price 162, 302 
Michelle Price 156, 302 
Rachel Price 162, 303 
Toni Price 152, 303 
Garett Prins 164, 303 
Laura Pryor 303 
Derek Puckett 170 
Edward Pugh 303 
Leigh Purkerson 1 56, 303 
Wesley Purnam 182 
Yolanda Purnell 303 
Christy Purscll 176, 303 
Amanda Purser 303 



Q 



Terri Quarles 152 
Carrie Quinlan 152 
Carolyn Quinlan 303 
Roderick Quinlan 303 
Dawn Quinn 1 76 



R 



Jocelyn Rackley 303 
Erin Radka 178 
Tracy Rahaim 178 
Randy Raggio 186 
John Rainey 178 
Raymond Rambin 188 
Shari Rajoo 303 
Tina Ramey 303 
Felicia Ramos 303 
Buck Randall 303 
Kimberly Ratcliff 303 
Catherine Ratcliffe 303 
Virginia Ratcliffe 303 
Chante Ravesies 303 
Pamela Rawlinson 303 
John Rayborn 303 
Tracey Raybourn 303 
Maria Rayner 176 
Jerry Read 303 
Susan Ready 303 
Skye Reardon 303 
Rhonda Reaves 148, 303 
Richard Rector 303 
Michele Reddoch 303 
Ashley Reed 178, 303 
Hillman Reed 166 
Marti Reed 154 
Stephanie Reed 303 
Guy Reedy 184 
Loriann Reep 303 
Kimberley Reese 303 
Leigh Reese 303 
Heather Reeves 303 
Laura Reeves 176 
Padra Reeves 303 
John Rehak 180 
Russell Reid 184 
Sandy Reid 168, 303 
Daniel Reiling 303 
Michael Reimer 303 
Tiffany Revon 154 
Robin Rey 176 
Rebecca Reyer 142 
John Reynolds 180 
Mary Reynolds 303 
Timothy Reynolds 303 
Frank Rhinehart 303 
Kavin Rhinehart 188 
Terrie Rhodes 303 
Kellie Rials 168, 202 



Ashley Rich 152, 303 
Daniel Rich 303 
Lelia Rich 303 
Jon Richard 184 
Patricia Richard 303 
Amy Richardson 156 
Bill Richardson 184 
Candace Richardson 176 
Greta Richardson 303 
Larry Richardson 150 
Patricia Richardson 178 
Righir Richardson 303 
Elizabeth Ricks 303 
Jamie Ridgeway 164 
Heidi Rieth 168, 303 
Stacie Riggan 154 
Tracy Rigsby 303 
Edward Riley 303 
Melissa Riley 30 
Tammy Riley 30 
Teejay Riley 154, 20 
Sherry Roberson 144 
Angie Roberts 1 76 
Charlotte Roberts, 168, 20 
Garyeth Roberts 20 
Lori Roberts 168, 20 
Margo Roberts 30 
Maria Roberts 30 
Melanie Roberts 304 
Randy Roberts 304 
Deborah Robertson 304 

Lillie Robertson 304 
Margaret Robertson 304 
Mary Robertson 304 
Kim Robinett 304 
Ashley Robinson 1554 
Kelly Robinson 154 
LaVetta Robinson 304 
Leslie Robinson 304 
Patrick Robinson 304 
Robyn Roby 168, 304 
Katrina Rodney 178 
Rudy Rodriguez 160, 304 
Alicia Rogers 304 
Julia Rogers 304 
Laura Rogers 304 
Stephanie Rogers 304 
Tarann Rogers 304 
Jena Rollins 178 
Linda Rone 304 
Samuel Rosa 304 
Shelley Rose 176 
Jared Roseti 150 
Matt Roseti 182 
Mona Ross 304 
Veronica Rosser 304 
Gregory Rothberg 304 
Rachel Rouse 304 
Kim Royal 1 52 
Stephen Ruegger 182 
Patsy Ruhl 1545 
Michelle Ruiz 304 
Amy Runnels 304 
April Runnels 152 
Jennifer Runnels 304 
Denise Rush 304 
Kim Rushing 144, 304 
Kurt Rushing 304 
Lisa Rushing 304 
Pamela Rushing 304 
Bethany Rushton 178 
Tommie Rushton 304 
Bill Russ 184 
Chandler Russ 184 
Amy Russell 304 
Barri Russell 142 
Jenean Russell 304 
Kelly Russell 178 
Lance Russell 188 
Laura Russell 178, 304 
Mark Russell 184, 304 
Scott Russell 1 70 
Danny Russum Jr. 164 
Jay Rustin 304 
Alissa Ruth 304 
Christie Ryals 304 
Dorecn Ryals 304 
Keith Runnels 304 



Jean Sadaway 304 

Sandy Salers 304 

Angie Saliba 304 

Kelly Salter 142 

Steven Salt/man 170 

David Sammons 164 

Stephanie Sampson 304 

L. A. Sanchez 306 

Murray Sanderford 186 

Adonis Sanders 146, 306 

Angela Sanders 306 

Christy Sanders 1 54 

Scott Sanders 188 

Shelley Sanders 1 54 

Lori Sandifer 306 

David Sandiford 170 

Sonja Sandig 306 

Pamela Sanford 306 

Rose Sanford 306 

Tammy Sanford 306 

Shelley Sansing 168, 306 

Amy Sarine 306 
Arnold Sartin 306 

Kimberly Saucier 306 

David Saulters 170 

Jeff Saulters 170 

Melanie Saulters 168, 306 

Renee Schaefer 306 

Krik Scheel 170 

Sarah Scheuermann 306 

Traci Schexnauder 306 

Tonya Schillaci 1 56 

Amanda Schilling 152 

Sandra Schilling 176 

Melisssa Schjerven 162, 306 

Joseph Schlater III 306 

Bill Schlicher 182 

Stacey Schlicter 152 

James Schlottman 174 

Susan Schoel 306 

Bryan Scholl 164 

Kris Schroyer 142 

Rudd Schultze 186 

Cynthia Scott 306 

Emily Scott 154 

Marc Scott 306 

Jennifer Scrimpshire 154 

Monica Scruggs 168, 206 

Victoria Scully 168, 306 

Ann Seago 168 

Sharon Seago 306 

Michael Seal 306 

Susie Seal 306 

Todd Seal 1 84 

Susan Seale 306 

Patricia Seals 306 

Traci Selman 306 

Troy Selmon 306 

Ronald Senko 182 

Al Senseman 182 

Joy Senseney 306 

Selena Sewer 306 

Gary Seyfarth Jr. 164 

Stephanie Seymour 168, 306 

Warren Seymour 182 

Lynwood Shannon 188 

Brad Sharp 306 

Brent Shaw 1 70 

Yvette Shaw 306 

Mary Sheffield 306 

Rob Shelter 174 

Dixie Shephard 162, 306 

Monica Shepherd 306 

Sandra Sheridan 306 

Kathleen Sherman 306 
, Amy Shifalo 168, 306 

Delaine Shirley 306 

Rebecca Shirley 306 

Shi Zhenjiang 306 

Sean Shoemake 174 

Gabriel Shoemaker 160, 306 

Lisa Shore 168. 306 

Joe Shoulders 184, 306 

Douglas Shows 306 

Paula Shows 162. 306 



Index 327 



Jennifer Sicura 162, 306 
Pam Sidebottom 1 54 
Elizabeth Simeon 306 
Jason Simmons 184 
Lori Simmons 306 
Lesley Simpson 162, 306 
John Simrall 184 
Mark Simrall 184 
John Sims 184, 306 
Loyd Sims 308 
Kenneth Sinion 174 
Himbert Sinopoli 308 
Jeffrey Sistrunk 184 
Michelle Skiles 148, 308 
Ashley Skellie 168, 308 
Aaron Skipper 308 
Ron Skrmetta 184 
Patrick Skrmetti 164 
Heidi Slacken 176 
Kimsye Slaughter 158, 308 
Sandra Slawson 308 
Carlos Slawson 308 
Lisa Slay 152 
Aubrey Smith 308 
Brian Smith 170 
Bruce Smith 170 
Brunette Smith 308 
Carolyn Smith 308 
Chad Smith 186 
Chris Smith 150, 308 
Clay Smith 308 
Connie Smith 308 
Dana Smith 180 
Darren Smith 308 
Darrell Smith 186 
Donna Smith 308 
Erin Smith 154 
Gin Smith 154 
Glenn Smith 182 
Greg Smith 308 
Jarrod Smith 308 
Jeannie Smith 308 
Jennifer Smith 308 
Jennifer Smith 154, 308 
Jonathan Smith 308 
Julie Smith 154, 308 
Karen Smith 308 
Kelley Smith 308 
Kelly Smith 308 
Kevin Smith 308 
Kim Smith 154 
Lisa Smith 308 
Penny Smith 152 
Robert Smith 308 
Robyn Smith 168, 308 
Samuel Smith 308 
Sandee Smith 308 
Shavett Smith 308 
Shelby Smith 308 
Stacy Smith 176 
Tait Smith 182 
Verna Smith 308 
Judy Smithhart 141, 308 
Christine Smothers 308 
Barbara Snow 162, 308 
Michael Snowden 308 
Stacey Songe 178 
Charlotte Sonnicr 152 
Laurie Sonnier 1 52 
Michelle Sorenson 142 
Joseph Soileau 182 
Yvette Soulie 308 
Sherry Southern 308 
Mitzie Sowell 308 
Regina Spain 308 
Andrew Spaniol 308 
Richie Spears 308 
Susan Spears 152, 308 
LaShawn Speed 308 
Suzanne Speed 1 52 
Sandon Speedling 170 
Carla Speights 168, 308 
Joseph Speights 308 
Sheldon Speights 308 
Debbie Spciss 157 
William Spcnce 174 
Clif Spencer 170 
Julia Spencer 308 
Mark Spencer 308 



Mary Spencer 308 
Michael Spencer 309 
Sonya Spencer 309 
Tunga Spencer 309 
Aminta Spight 309 
Joseph Spring 309 
Julian Springier 309 
John Sproles 186 
David Staehling 150 
Claudia Stalcup 176 
Michael Stallworth 309 
Darrin St. Amant 150 
Elizabeth Stanley 168, 309 
William Stanford 309 
Suzanne Stanton 156, 309 
Alyssia Starkey 176 
Fred Starnes 309 
Angela Steed 309 
Gail Steed 156 
Michael Steele 309 
Berry Steinacher 309 
Suzanne Stephens 309 
David Stephenson 164 
Don Sterling 184 
Beverly Stevens 309 
Jennifer Stevens 168, 309 
Tracey Stevens 152 
Kelly Stevenson 309 
Billy Stewart 186, 309 
Connie Stewart 309 
Meredith Stewart 309 
Meshalle Stewart 186 
Sharon Stewart 309 
Tanya Stewart 168, 309 
Amy Stiglet 309 
Lonnie Stinnett 186 
Shannon Stockman 309 
Donnica Stockstill 309 
Donna Stockstill 309 
Belinda Stogner 309 
James Stogner 309 
Stephen Stogner 309 
Jennifer Stokley 309 
Tony Stokley 309 
Bryan Strachan 309 
Deborah Straub 156, 309 
Seth Stringer 160, 309 
Vicki Stringfellow 154 
DeeDee Strong 156 
Denise Strong 309 
Shane Strong 309 
Maria Stroud 309 
Tracey Stroup 309 
Frank Stuart 174 
Mauri Stubbs 309 
Jennifer Studebaker 178, 309 
Gary Stupica 170 
Annie Sturdivant 309 
Chip Sturdivant 309 
Charlie Sullivan 174 
Delores Sullivan 309 
James Sullivan 309 
Joe Sullivan 150 
Kandace Sullivan 309 
Lynda Sullivan 309 
Peggy Sullivan 309 
Tara Sullivan 309 
Leyla Sumar 309 
Sapardi Sumardi 309 
Rachel Summerson 168, 309 
Janet Sumrall 153 
Richard Sumrall 309 
Laura Surratt 310 
Robyn Sutton 152, 310 
Alissa Swanner 310 
Luke Swanzy 180 
Morris Swarts 164 
Sean Sweeney 170 
John Swider 164 
Joseph Swider 164 
Lisa Swilley 154 
Christine Swindle 310 
Duke Swyers 310 
Syafril Syarief 310 
Kristan Szmurlo 168, 310 
Karen Szymanski 152 



Bridget Tadlock 142 
Stacey Tagert 310 
Michele Tait 310 
Tonya Tait 310 
Tim Taranto 174 
Monica Tamor 310 
George Tate 182 
Regenia Tate 158, 310 
Amy Taylor 310 
Jennifer Taylor 168, 310 
Jeremy Taylor 180 
Kay Taylor 310 
Kimberly Taylor 310 
Marie Taylor 310 
McGehee Taylor 184 
Robert Taylor 310 
Shelley Taylor 152 
Tammy Taylor 310 
Thelma Taylor 310 
Virna Taylor 310 
Jeffrey Temple 310 
Sharon Temple 310 
Steven Temple 310 
Aron Teneyck 186 
Karen Terrell 310 
Tarsha Terrible 310 
Jill Terry 156 
Robby Terry 310 
Bill Thallemer 180 
Natalie Thames 168, 210 
Stacey Theobald 310 
Elizabeth Therrell 310 
Paul Theunissen 174 
Carol Thigpen 156, 310 
Cassandra Thomas 310 
David Thomas 164 
Marsie Thomas 310 
Michael Thomas 310 
Molly Thomas 154, 310 
Rick Thomas 150 
Robert Thomas 164 
Stanley Thomas III 310 
Tonya Thomas 162, 310 
Dana Thomley 310 
Satoya Thompkins 312 
Cindy Thompson 312 
Craig Thompson 160, 312 
Dawn Thompson 312 
Danny Thompson 174 
Dennis Thompson 312 
Eric Thompson 312 
Germaine Thompson 312 
Lisa Thompson 312 
Richard Thompson 312 
Rick Thompson 180 
Sharon Thompson 312 
Sharon Thompson 312 
Tammy Thompson 312 
Tony Thompson 312 
Brant Thorn 180 
Kevin Thorn 1 80 
Willie Thornton 312 
Mindy Thurmond 156, 312 
Alison Tibbett 152 
Melissa Tidwell 312 
Tim Tillson 312 
LaRonda Tiney 312 
Charlotte Todaso 178 
Devin Tomlinson 164 
Rick Tomses 174 

Robin Toney 312 
Greg Toomey 160 
Thomas Toomey 160, 312 

Fred Toplin 312 

Cynthia Topps 312 

Danielle Torres 312 

Malcolm Torres 170 

Mary Claire Torres 152 

Shelly Traxler 152 

Jennifer Traynom 168, 312 

Torey Treganowen 150 

Angela Trcst 178, 312 

Donna Trigg 176, 312 

Patricia Trigg 312 

William Trigg 312 

Laura Trimble 312 

Valeria Trotter 312 

Anet Trouble 312 

Anita Trouble 312 



Brian Tubbs 312 
Phyliss Tucker 312 
Amy Tullis 156, 312 
Andra Tullos 312 
Marc Tullos 170 
Tanya Tullos 152, 312 
Jennifer Turner 154, 312 
Nichole Turner 144, 312 
Sharon Turner 312 
Wanda Turner 312 
Jefry Twiggs 174 
Christy Tynes 156 
Randall Tynes 184 



u 






Donnie Underwood 182 
Kimberly Upton 312 
Jeff Upton 312 



V 



Mario Vaccarella 312 
Natalie Valasek 312 
Al Vance 312 
Janis Vance 312 
Chad Van Kooten 180 
Melba Vannest 312 
David Vardaman 184 
Amy Vaughan 162, 312 
Bennie Vaughn 312 
Jill Vaughn 312 
Trina Vaughn 312 
Dion Vecchio 188 
Marilyn Vertison 312 
Julia Viator 312 
Charles Vice 188 
Ray Vick 314 
Julie Vicknair 314 
Cesar Villanueva 314 
Steven Villanueva 174 
Susan Vincent 176 
Steve Vincent 180 
Lee Vines 182 
Christopher Viverette 314 
Dina Viviano 176 
Russell Voce 170 
Dana Vogt 168, 314 



w 



Lane Wade 314 

Pamela Waggoner 314 

Colleen Wagner 314 

Patricia Waits 314 

Stacy Waits 152 

Alfred Walchak Jr. 188 

Jeff Walden 182 

Andy Walker 184 

Daisha Walker 178 

Kevin Walker 184 

Lela Walker 314 

Primrose Elizabeth Walker 314 

Robert Walker 186 

Scott Walker 184 

Scott Walker 186 

Bryant Wallace 174 

Kenitra Wallace 314 

Sharon Wallace 314 

Ann Walley 152 

Pamela Walley 314 

Marc Walling 188 

Andrea Walston 314 

Wendy Walston 314 

Rhonda Walters 162, 314 

Dexter Walton 314 

Paul Walton 164 

David Wang 314 

Michelle Wanko 162, 314 

Staci Wann 314 

Charles Ward 314 

Gary Ward 314 

Sebastian Ward 314 



328 Index 



Selina Ward 314 

Natalia Ware 314 

Greg Warren 184 

Dana Roberts Warren 314 

Lisa Warren 314 

Miichael Warren 170 

Scotty Warren 184 

William Warsaw 314 

Latisha Wash 314 

Chris Washam 314 

Amy Washburn 314 

Yolanda Washington 158, 314 

Kiyomia Watabc 314 

Lauren Watkins 156 

Gerald Watson 34 

Stephanie Watson 176 

Ursula Watson 314 

Douglas Watts 314 

Dabncy Weatherford 142, 314 

Kara Weatherford 154 

Johnny Weathersby 172, 314 

C. C. Weaver 152 

Gates Weaver 170 

Lori Weaver 314 

Monique Weaver 314 

Brad Webb 186 

Brandon Webb 170 

Brigitte Webb 314 

Christi Webb 152 

James Webb 314 

Nichell Webber 314 

Torowal Webber 158, 314 

Darla Welch 314 

Molly Weems 314 

Shelley Weidman 154, 314 

Tonya Weinberg 176 

Larry Welborn 314 

Darla Welch 152 

Kyle Welch 314 

LeAnna Welch 142 

Robert Welch 314 

Scott Weldon 150 

Jacquelyn Wells 314 

Kim Wells 176 



Mike Wells 160 

Shcryl Wells 314 

Elizabeth Welsh 154, 314 

Michael Wells 314 

Jason Wesberry 1XX 

B. J. Wescovich 316 

Bob West 164 

Brigitte West 316 

Christopher Westbrook 316 

Sherry Westbrook 316 

Toni Westbrook 316 

Virginia Wheat 316 

Amy Wheeler 142, 316 

Ashley White 316 

Brian White 186 

Deidra White 316 

Gastinel White 316 

James White 316 

Janet White 158, 316 

Jerry White 316 

Joel White 150 

Laurie White 316 

Merideth White 152 

Mike White 170 

Pattie White 176, 316 

Paul White 316 

Thomas White 180 

Ursula Whitehead 316 

William Whitley III 184 

Frederick Whitlock 316 

Mike Whitson 316 

Kinette Whittington 316 

Memrie Whittington 168, 316 

Tomekia Whittle 316 

Stacey Wibright 316 

John Wichman 188 

Reese Widemire 180 

Joe Wiggins 164 

Welsey Wilkes 316 

Angela Wilkie 316 

Jeff Wilkinson 174 

Anita Williams 316 

Bettie Williams 316 

Breshell Williams 316 



Brian Williams 316 
Carol Williams 316 
Carol Williams 316 
Cecilia Williams 316 
Celeste Williams 316 
Charlotte Williams 316 
Cindy Williams 316 
Francelia Williams 316 
Glen Williams 180 
Kendra Williams 316 
Kimberlie Williams 316 
Kris Williams 184 
Larry Williams 316 
Laura Williams 142, 316 
Missy Williams 316 
Nicole Williams 316 
Evelyn Willis 316 
Lisa Willis 316 
Mike Wills 1X0 
Mark Willson 180 
Patti Willson 178, 316 
Alicia Willson 316 
Anita Wilson 316 
David Wilson 316 
Opal Williams 316 
Stevie Williams 316 
Terro Williams 316 
Tessie Williams 316 
Ronals Williamson 316 
Serry Williamson 316 
Debora Wilson 318 
Kimberly Wilson 318 
Terry Wilson 318 
Josh Wimberly 184 
Nila Windham 318 
Phatasis Winfrey 158, 3 IX 
Michael Winger 31X 
Mark Wink 318 
Guy Winstead 170 
Samantha Winters 318 
Christopher Wise 318 
Douglas Wise 318 
Joseph Wise 318 
Tammy Wise 318 



Michele Wishart 318 
Dre' Wissner 318 
Jack Wolf 182 
Sharyle Wolfe 31X 
James Womack 318 
Leslie Womack I 76 
Peter Woo 3 1 8 
Angela Wood 318 
Charlotte Wood 318 
Melissa Wood 162, 31 
Janice Woodard 318 
Kathy Woodard 318 
Wendy Woodard 318 
Julie Woodcock 178 
Kelly Woods 318 
Kenneth Woods 164 
Neil Woods 318 
Scott Woods 318 
Bettie Wraggs 318 
Ginny Wray 318 
Pier Wright 318 
Stanley Wright 318 
James Wvnne 318 



Mona Yates 318 
Melanie Yeatman 318 
Dianna Yelverton 318 
Shuk Yee Yip 318 
Howard Yocow 318 
Andre' Young 318 
Patrick Young 318 
Julie Youngblood 318 



Leslie Zanders 319 
Holly Zemke 319 
Michelle Zenner 319 
Constance Ziz 319 



Editor's Note: 

It's funny that one of my favorite movies is "Gremlins." It seems that the whole year the staff has been plagued by the little critters, especialy around deadline time. I can 
just see them, waiting in the dark 'til the last person leaves the office and shuts the door. Then they spring out laughing, to gorge themselves on crumbs and to generally 
wreak havoc in the yearbook office. 

Pictures, copy and layouts all have disappeared into never-never land, carried off by those creatures hell-bent to cause confusion in the lives of bewildered Annual 
staffers, particularly your's truly. 

Oh well, that's life. Time to laud those who suffered, sacrificed and survived the darndest attempts of our nocturnal visitors to foul the progress of the 1990 
SOUTHERNER. 

First, a big thanks to our advisor, Barbara Ross. Barbara, I'm sure there were times when you thought we weren't going to make it. But we did, and all credit goes to you 
for lighting the fire under our tails to make sure we got the job done. 

Now the Staff. Guys, when the chips were down, ya'll came through to get this monster lashed together and off to the printers. Kudos to ya, gang. 

To Tammy Petro, our proofreader. I don't know how you did it, but you managed to take care of two kids, your husband, grad school. AND the index without going com- 
pletely wacko. Here's to you, Tammy. Thanks a bunch. 

To Ed Wheeler, a big thanks for pushing me to get this job. I've learned from the experience, and not just about yearbook production. Thanks. Ed, and yeah, I'll try to 
grow up now. 

To David Taylor, who gave us lab time and chemistry when the pressure was on. D. T., thanks a great deal. Next box of Antonio y Cleopatras are on me. 

Thanks to the folks at Photo Services for the pics and not getting TOO upset when we called for reprints of photos that were eaten by yearbook gremlins with the mun- 
chies. 

Let's not forget the STUDENT PRINTZ staff. Thanks for letting us conduct search and destroy missions on the files for the stuff we missed. 

Also, thanks to Dr. Aubrey Lucas for taking time out to pose in the one room schoolhouse. 

Many thanks to the following: Chris Crenshaw, Vicky Copeland, Vrita Delaine, Warren Dunn, James Heimdal, Larry Hollis. Mike Morgan, Rosie Nettles, Randy 
Raggio, David Sears, Laurie White and Steve Zary. 

I would like to thank my roommates for putting up with me over the last eight months. I'll clean up the kitchen as soon as I wake up. 

Lastly, I would like to express my gratitude to my family, who put up with my irrational phone calls home for money and spiritual support. Sorry folks, I'll try to do better. 
I love you all. 

If I left anybody out of this, please accept my profuse apologies. So much has transpired during the last school year that faces, names, classes, tests have all blurred. But 
through this, I (and the Staff) have become a little bit wiser. 

And that's the reason we come to school, right? 



Index 329 



SOUTHERNER 
T 

F 
F 



1990 USM 
SOUTHERNER Staff: 

Editor G. M. Andrews 

Advisor Barbara Ross 

Proofreader Tammy Petro 

Managing Editor Mindy Thurmond 

Assistant Editor/Design Lorna Freeman 

Assistant Editor/Copy Vincent Clark 

Assistant Editor/Photo Gary Haygood 

Academics: 

Section Head Kyna Lee 

Greeks: 

Section Head Katie Hanson 

Ann Leaumont 

Administration: 

Section Head Pam Ragsdale 

Susan Walker 

Organizations 

Section Head Chris Bond 

Pam Ragsdale 

Gary Daniels 

People & Feature: 

Section Head Roma Johnson 

Photography: 

Julie Guintard 

Barry Beard 

Kevin Cooper 

Mike Doyle 

Ellen Gardner 

Ron Howell 

Andy Miller 

Robert Youngblood 

Student Life: 

Section Head Jonathon Ingram 




A (Above) Southerner Staff: Row One: Chris Bond, Heather McKee, Row Two: 
Ross, Kyna Lee, Glenn Andrews, Lorna Freeman, Ann Leaumant. Row Three: 
Petro, Pam Ragsdale, Katie Wilson. 



Barbara 
Tammy 








■4 (Far left) Kyna Lee, Glenn Andrews, Chris Bond, 
and Pam Ragsdale try to determine where to place a 
picture on a page. 

•4 (Middle) Lorna Freeman, Heather McKee, Vince 
Clark, Katie Hanson, and Ann Leaumont are at work 
in the yearbook room. 

•4 (Left) Photographers: Robert Youngblood, Ron 
Howell, Kevin Cooper, Gary Haygood, Glenn 
Andrews. 



Colophon 







A (Above) Glenn Andrews and Barbara Ross try to decide just 
who is in the picture. • Photos by Steve Zary 



The 1990 SOUTHERNER was produced by the students and advisors of 
the SOUTHERNER staff. 

The SOUTHERNER was printed by Herff Jones Yearbooks of Mont- 
gomery, Ala., using the offset lithography process. 

The cover of the 1990 SOUTHERNER was conceived by staff members 
and is black with a metal-lay golden eagle. Blind-embossed tool lines pro- 
duce the "coin" effect. 

The endsheets consist of white matted paper with black ink and gold foil 
applied to the front endsheet. 

The type face used throughout the SOUTHERNER is Times Roman in 
1 point size for body copy and eight point for photo captions. Times Roman 
Bold is used for headlines, with division page headlines in 48 point type, 
main headlines in 36 point type and subheads in 18 point. 

The theme "Worth Our Weight in GOLD," was developed by Design 
Editor Lorna Freeman, who also developed the overall design of the 1990 
SOUTHERNER. 

The design of the Organization Section was developed by Organization 
Editor Chris Bond. The design of the Greek Section was developed by 
Greek Editors Katie Hanson and Ann Leaumont. 

People Section and Organization Section photos were taken by USM 
Photo Services, along with team photos and Greek Section headshots. Com- 
posites were taken by several composite companies. 

All other photos were taken by SOUTHERNER staff photographers. 
Color photos were shot on Fujicolor HR and Kodak VRG 1 00, 200, 400 and 
1600 films. Black & white photos were shot on Fuji Neopan 400 and 1600 
films and Kodak Tri-X and T-Max 400 and 3200 films. Prints were made 
by staffers on Kodak Polycontrast III and Ilford Multigrade III black & 
white papers. 












CLOSING 331 






v:: 




▲ (Above) Students talk in the 
shade between classes in front of the 
residence halls. ► (Right) Students 
pass some of their spare moments on 
the steps of the library. ► (Far 
Right) As a result of the Student 
Affairs staff retreat, a vision state- 
ment was developed. 



332 Closing 










Worth Our Weight In 



GOLD 




Closing 333 




A (Above) Many students receive 
junk mail by the ton. ► (Right) 
Some students study outside of the 
Union under the shade of oak trees. 
► (Far Right) The Administration 
Building adds to the beauty of the 
campus. 





334 Closing 




As was said in the opening, time 
passes quickly, and now it seems 
like the year has come and gone in 
the blink of an eye. Warm days 
have returned, but before you 
know it the summer is here and 
USM has been put behind for yet 
another year. Although no one will 
admit it, they will probably miss 
those mad dashes for class while at 
the same time try to wonder where 
all that time went. Where did it 
go? 

Most of it was spent in class and 
studying. But then there's the time 
spent in the Commons or in front 
of the Hub watching students pass 
by on their way to class. Here at 
the Southerner we believe we have 
more than adequately held these 
memories for everyone to look at. 
Therefore, our purpose for the 
year is complete: to capture the 
best memories on paper for every- 
one to share in together. Please en- 
joy the book, because to most peo- 
ple it is "Worth Its Weight In 
GOLD." 



Worth Our Weight In 



GOLD 




Closing 335 



► (Right) Students take a leisure stroll to 
class. 



So the year is gone, and there is nothing left 
to say except that it was a great one. Friend- 
ships were made and lost, but time goes on. 
Next year can only get better here at USM. In 
fact, no one believes it has ever been better. So 
sometime down the road, remember that the 
years at Southern were well spent. They can 
best be described as Golden, as being "Worth 
Their Weight in GOLD." 





Worth Our Weight In 

- GOLD - 



9 



336 Closing